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11-22-2014, 04:03 AM   #16
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Okay! Wow, this last round of responses from you guys has given me a lot to ponder. I'm still waiting on the camera's arrival. Atlanta to Houston via UPS ground is probably 4 or 5 days. Given that tomorrow is Saturday, I guess I might see it show up Monday or probably Tuesday at the latest. It'll be easier to relate to your comments and advice if I have the camera in front of me.

You know, I've been shooting with long lenses and slow film emulsions, which often has meant very slow shutter speeds, for many years. I can recall, back in about 1985 or so, I bought my first mirror lens -- a Sigma 600mm f/8. That Sigma was actually an outstanding mirror, but it took me a while and a fair amount of practice before I realized it. I can also recall, after a few months of pretty dreadful results, a growing conviction that I'd bought a turkey, And then something happened -- I'd at last sucked up some discipline and things settled down. The Sigma began showing hints of its true capability, which caused me to work even harder at bringing its performance to light -- so to speak. Sometimes, as my confidence grew, I'd even stick a quality teleconverter on the back of it to get a whopping 1200mm f/16, typically shooting Kodachrome 64 (rated to ISO 80 for better color saturation). So I learned the importance of having a stout tripod, preferably a tripod collar on the lens, a plain matte focusing screen on those cameras I owned that supported interchangeable focusing screens, using a cable shutter release, and, of course, mirror lock up. I even had eyepiece magnifiers or, in the case of my Nikon F2, a 6x eye-level finder, to make sure I nailed focus. With long focal lengths often comes razor thin depths of field so it was a challenge all by itself just finding a point of focus, especially in a dynamic environment. But I perservered, and that Sigma just got better and better as my technique improved. As a result, I now have a quantity of slides, many of which are 27, 28 years old now, that would challenge any good, say, 16mp or so, digital SLR's resolution.

So anyway, the above is in response to a few comments in which some of you didn't care for the 300mm or thought it wasn't so great, or whatever -- or even long Pentax lenses in general. Which I found puzzling. I don't have that many Pentax K lenses, but those I have and have owned are and have been unrivaled in terms of sharpness and contrast. I know that, with its huge 6x7 film surface area, images can be quite dramatic without having to resort to high /powers. But the 6x7 is actually uniquely qualified amongst the clique of 6x7 machines. I know of no other 6x7 make in which such large telephotos have been offered. Well, Rollei had some very long teles in their catalog for their old SL66's, but those were 6x6 machines, not 6x7. And I've wondered if they actually sold any, given that they retailed for the equivalent price of a nice, late model used car.

11-22-2014, 05:16 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Duplo Quote
Choice of film is not what it used to be, but luckily my favourite black and white films are still readily available and colour film selection is not a total disaster either

My suggestion, get out there and use it
Heard that! I agree about the sad state of decreasing film offerings. However, I've found that Kodak's Portra films to be probably the best negative color films I've ever used. I like Portra 160 even more than Ektar. Grain is amazingly tiny, colors are rich and saturated, great latitude. I just hope Kodak doesn't get rid of it the way they did with many of their other great films.
11-22-2014, 08:11 AM   #18
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If using long lenses and long exposures on tripod, it's a good idea to make sure the tripod+head weigh more than the camera+lens - maybe even twice as much, according to this article: Pentax67ii . You're probably familiar with hanging a heavy camera bag from the tripod to weigh it down; one can also attach a bungee cord to the tripod and hold it to the ground with one's foot or a tent stake, so as to avoid tripod motion from the camera bag swaying if there is a breeze. Except for macros, though, I tend to use my 67 hand-held, even with the 300mm lens, and just keep the shutter speed high (I typically use faster film).


Have fun!
11-22-2014, 11:52 AM   #19
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The limitation with using the long lenses with the 6x7 is that the shutter has way more influence on sharpness than when using a 35mm camera. The 600 Takumar is a real challenge because of it. With experimentation, the 600 can be used successfully with converters or without. Shooting between 1 second and 1/30 will be a problem. I use mine with either 50 speed film and slow shutter speeds or 400 speed film and 1/125 sec. Shooting between f/4 and f/11, one will see color fringing unless the light is flat. This lens is way sharp once you get it figured out. It likes the 1.4X converter but the 2X is more of a challenge due to shutter shake. If you don't need more than 6X magnification, the 400 Takumar with 1.4X is easier to use. If you are unsure about the 300 Takumar, read the test reports on it, in the DATABASES here is Pentax Forums. It has many different problems. There is a Pentax 1000mm Reflex lens (mirror) made for the 67 as well.


Last edited by desertscape; 11-22-2014 at 12:01 PM.
11-23-2014, 02:08 PM   #20
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From what I have read the 200 f/4 is a superior quality lens to the 300. I have been very happy with my 200 which I picked up about 2 months ago and have been shooting it more than I thought I would. I was thinking about possibly adding the 1.4x extender on it, but for now I have been very happy with its reach for my personal application of it. I also picked up a set of extension tubes recently and have been enjoying the diversity of range they add to my kit for very little space/weight.

The aftermarket wooden handle (the one that is a side finger grip like the 67ii body) is the one you want. If I was doing portraits I would have defiantly hunted one down by now but 90% of my shooting is off a tripod (low light/asa).
11-24-2014, 05:12 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by cooltouch Quote
Heard that! I agree about the sad state of decreasing film offerings. However, I've found that Kodak's Portra films to be probably the best negative color films I've ever used. I like Portra 160 even more than Ektar. Grain is amazingly tiny, colors are rich and saturated, great latitude. I just hope Kodak doesn't get rid of it the way they did with many of their other great films.
In terms of colour films I am still very torn, I have not shot enough Ektar to form a solid opinion on it, but so far i like it a lot, still need to test it for some of the full body work I have in mind though and that is going to be the deciding factor, it is not completely going to replace the 160 speed films, a touch too saturated sometimes.
I tend to prefer the Pro160NS from fuji over Portra 160, where in terms of the 400 speed films I am inclined to say that I may actually prefer the Portra one over the Pro 400H
Velvia 50 still have its place on occasions.
Come to think of it, the situation could be worse

For black and white I have a soft spot for ilford XP2 super and HP4 in particular, but the odd roll of Delta 400 sneaks in here and there.
11-25-2014, 02:45 PM   #22
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never be bashfull about shooting film, film is great suff! when digitwits try to heckel me' for shooting film i point out out a Pentax 67 is a 250 megapixel camera!
11-25-2014, 03:21 PM   #23
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I am becoming more and more annoyed and aghast at the stupidity and arrogance of the (neatly termed!) digiwits. Encounters with them are more common now than ever. I was criticised last weekend for my camera (the most inimitable 67) "making a f*** of a noise!" in what I regard as "my office" -- a rainforest. That a couple of digi-toting city slickers should follow me in there to photograph what only I knew about struck me as unsettling. Not long after their expletive-laden rant about noise (good that my deafness does not allow me to share their displeasure), the 67 finished a roll of Velvia and this couple of overbearing CUBs (cashed-up bogans) left me in peace. Drrrrft.

11-25-2014, 08:08 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Roguephotographer Quote
never be bashfull about shooting film, film is great suff! when digitwits try to heckel me' for shooting film i point out out a Pentax 67 is a 250 megapixel camera!
QuoteOriginally posted by Silent Street Quote
Not long after their expletive-laden rant about noise
That’s a shame, but unfortunately some people are …………

Around this part of the world there are a lot of film shooters, so when I’m out with “THOR” I usually get friendly smiles or questions on what type of camera I have.

The only annoying people are some CANIKON digiwits (like that term) with big cameras/lenses who never make eye contact with me and look somewhat annoyed/challenged when they see my 67”s. At least they never speak to me or say anything.

Phil.
11-26-2014, 06:46 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by Roguephotographer Quote
never be bashfull about shooting film, film is great suff! when digitwits try to heckel me' for shooting film i point out out a Pentax 67 is a 250 megapixel camera!
QuoteOriginally posted by Silent Street Quote
I am becoming more and more annoyed and aghast at the stupidity and arrogance of the (neatly termed!) digiwits. Encounters with them are more common now than ever. I was criticised last weekend for my camera (the most inimitable 67) "making a f*** of a noise!" in what I regard as "my office" -- a rainforest. That a couple of digi-toting city slickers should follow me in there to photograph what only I knew about struck me as unsettling. Not long after their expletive-laden rant about noise (good that my deafness does not allow me to share their displeasure), the 67 finished a roll of Velvia and this couple of overbearing CUBs (cashed-up bogans) left me in peace. Drrrrft.
QuoteOriginally posted by gofour3 Quote
That’s a shame, but unfortunately some people are …………

Around this part of the world there are a lot of film shooters, so when I’m out with “THOR” I usually get friendly smiles or questions on what type of camera I have.

The only annoying people are some CANIKON digiwits (like that term) with big cameras/lenses who never make eye contact with me and look somewhat annoyed/challenged when they see my 67”s. At least they never speak to me or say anything.

Phil.
Sorrry to hear about all the negative experiences here.
I have the 67ii out frequently and I have yet to experience any negative comments from anybody, mostly it is either not mentioned or just trigger a few curious comments.
Most people take if to being a digital camera actually
11-27-2014, 06:22 PM   #26
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Interesting comment about the noise. I went to a photo shoot a while back and I was one of two people there shooting film. He was shooting a 4x5 format rig, so noise wasn't an issue for him. But I showed up with my old Canon F-1 with Winder F attached and while others were busily snapping away with their CaNikons, whenever I would grab a shot you'd hear this per-Klackgrrgrrgdgk. And the model would always look over at me after I took a shot. Made me sort of feel self conscious, but then I would stop and recall not all that long ago whenever I'd watch a news conference on TV given by an important public figure, and whenever they'd make a significant gesture, there would be this cacophony of camera clicks and clacks and whirs and grinds and nobody thought a thing of it. My how times have changed.

I'm looking forward to the satisfying perchkKlunk sound of my 6x7, actually.

Oh, I forgot to report: the 6x7 kit arrived safe and sound this past Saturday. It is in very nice condition, with only light signs of wear. I have several of the 6v batteries it takes, but they're in a box or boxes that haven't been unpacked yet from the move to our new house. If I don't find one soon, I'm just gonna break down and buy another. I'm just dying to run a roll of film through it. Vellvia, Provia, or Portra? Hrmm . . . decisions, decisions.

Ok, so I read through the review of the 67 at the Luminous Landscape review above, and I found what he had to write about using this beast with long lenses at slow speeds quite intriguing. The vibration caused by the shutter, according to the author, is not an insurmountable problem. One just must be prepared. Using a tripod with a hook on the underside of the head to stabilize it is a good method. I'll have to check and see if any of my three stouter tripods has a hook there. I could always cobble something together that will work as well, though, I'm thinking.

But just now I was reminded of this absolute behemoth of a tripod I own that I bought at a swap meet several years ago. It's a Majestic, complete with geared head. The top surface of the head must be 8" square. I bought it for a pittance, thinking I could probably sell it for a quick buck on eBay. Now, I knew that Majestics sold for major bucks new, and I was rather dismayed to see that the few I ran across on eBay then were going for not much more than I paid for mine. So I just decided to keep it, but really had no idea what I'd use if for, unless I took up 8x10 (or larger) photography -- or using a 6x7 with long lenses! The tripod probably weighs 25 or 30 pounds, so it isn't anything I'll be tossing over my back for going on a hike over hill and dale with. But it definitely meets the requirements of outweighing the camera/lens combo. Now, all I have to do is remember where that thing got stowed during the moving in process . . .

I did a google image search and this is more or less what mine looks like:



Fully collapsed (as the above one is), it stands between three and four feet tall -- or about a meter or so, for you metric-minded folks. Mine's missing the odd screw/bolt/nut, but it's nothing that can't be done to put it back into fully working order.

Last edited by cooltouch; 11-27-2014 at 08:35 PM.
11-28-2014, 12:49 PM   #27
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That tripod may work for the long lenses but only a test will prove that. The problem you will run into is that the long lenses create a long distance between the tripod and the shutter. This in effect becomes a torque arm, in which the horizontal moving shutter causes the lens/camera to rotate sideways. At 1/8 second shutter speed, as an example with the 600mm, the shutter causes a harmonic which causes the whole system to ring like a bell. I found it better to use different film types (as I said above) rather than trying to shoot in the dangerous shutter speeds with all kinds of stabilizing solutions (Wimberley etc.).

Last edited by desertscape; 11-28-2014 at 01:20 PM.
11-29-2014, 01:18 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by gofour3 Quote
Yep I have the same issue with the 300mm FL on 6x7, hardly use it. Glad I did not buy the more expensive 300/4 ED!



The older 400/4 6x7 Takumar lens is a good performer and costs way less than the newer 400mm & 300mm ED lenses. It also works well with both converters.

Phil.
sounds like a plan, does anyone where you can get a quality job od scanning that exposed film to a disk??/
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