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02-03-2015, 12:49 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by bensonga Quote
I have a Berlebach Report (2 section with the leveling ball) and it's great for times when I don't need to carry it very far.

If I'm planning to hike a ways with the Pentax 67, I'll take my Induro CT313 (3 leg sections). It's a personal preference, but I don't like 4 section tripods.

Gary
I took a good long look at the Berlebach tripods and they certainly are an elegant solution. It makes perfect sense that wooden tripods would have superior vibration dampening properties.

Even though I just purchased a tripod made of gold dusted carbon fiber entwined unicorn horn, I can see the value of having a good optional unit made from a genuine retro material like wood. I might prefer it for around the house shooting.

I do own the tools and skills to produce some very nice woodwork. If I could find the right metal hardware to tie it together, I wouldn't mind trying my hand at making a tripod like this.

02-03-2015, 04:50 AM   #17
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BTW: I recall reading a heavy tripod review years back that did confirm the common knowledge belief that a high quality wooden tripod dampens out vibrations after being jarred faster than a metal (aluminum) tripod.
02-03-2015, 07:57 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by mikeSF Quote
I upgraded to an Induro carbon set which is very strong and sturdy. Weight capacity is 55lbs, so plenty for your 67ii rig. It is quite tall just with 3 leg sections extended, much higher than I need, so I only extend a 4th section if i am standing on a steep hill and need to throw a leg down in front.
I put up a review here:

Induro CT414 8X Carbon Tripod reviews - Pentax Camera Accessory Review Database
I too like to shoot the 4 section model with only 3 sections extended. The only difference is that I picked up the 214 instead of the 414 to use with my 67II, I've had the pair for almost a decade and don't think you need bigger model. I'll use the 214 for travel and ill bungy it to my bag if I'm really worried about shake. I do have a Gitzo 410 i take out if portability is a non issue, but that is primarily reserved for the Shen Hao.
02-03-2015, 08:45 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by vZwicky Quote
... I just purchased a tripod made of gold dusted carbon fiber entwined unicorn horn,
haha, good one

---------- Post added 02-03-2015 at 07:46 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by WPRESTO Quote
BTW: I recall reading a heavy tripod review years back that did confirm the common knowledge belief that a high quality wooden tripod dampens out vibrations after being jarred faster than a metal (aluminum) tripod.
i believe it.

---------- Post added 02-03-2015 at 07:49 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by johnsey Quote
I too like to shoot the 4 section model with only 3 sections extended. The only difference is that I picked up the 214 instead of the 414 to use with my 67II, I've had the pair for almost a decade and don't think you need bigger model. I'll use the 214 for travel and ill bungy it to my bag if I'm really worried about shake. I do have a Gitzo 410 i take out if portability is a non issue, but that is primarily reserved for the Shen Hao.
cool. i took mine to the beach Sunday and baptised it in the ocean. surprised how little sand entered the legs and clamps, i pretty much hosed it down after and it was operating smoothly again.
Yes, the 414 is pretty much at my eye level with only 3 of the 4 sections extended, so I reserve the 4th section for hillside shooting where i can throw an extended leg down in front of me. that works great!

02-03-2015, 10:16 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by vZwicky Quote
After researching specs and reading reviews I've concluded that I want this kit to be as light and as compact as possible- as light as a kit that includes a P67 can be anyway.
I've been shooting my 6x7 for over 25 years. I've put it on a lot of different tripods. The thing is, you can get by with a compact tripod if you do not raise the camera to eye-level. And I believe it's the curtain inertia that is the driving force in camera shake more so than the mirror. You can also reduce this when using a smaller tripod by adding dampening. That is, a sandbag-type weight on top of the camera. You can use your hand to gently push down if you have fast enough shutter speed.

And when we talk "big tripods" for the 6x7 we really need to also talk about which lens and shutter speed in the same breath. I have handhold shots with the 55mm that are pretty much as sharp as any tripod shot I've done. So these wide lenses can do even better on a modest-size tripod.

So lenses like the M* 300/400mm ED IF can be the most difficult and can benefit more if you use two tripods instead of one. Mount one on the lens mount and one supporting the cantilevered camera body (can also use a mono pod for that).

If you want to test your tripod and camera for shutter vibration, set it up and take a shot. Next slap on a 9 or 10 stop ND filter and get the shutter speed down to say 30+ seconds and take a shot. Any shutter vibration will not be recorded due to its short duration compared to the overall exposure.
02-03-2015, 11:04 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote

So lenses like the M* 300/400mm ED IF can be the most difficult .
slightly off topic but since you mentioned the 67 M*300, I use this lens with my 645D and a 67 1.4x extender, and without a gimbal type head, find it wanting to tilt back, the camera end being heaviest. I did not initially realize that the mounting foot of this lens may be removed and reversed to throw that weight forward a good bit and improve the overall balance of the rig. Now i am really digging that combination and stability is nice. I use a saddlebag-type sandbag to lay over the camera and will hang my gear bag from the column hook if needed to counter some wind movement.
This is where the max capacity of the legs and head matter, when you are adding 20+ more pounds to the rig.
02-03-2015, 12:26 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by mikeSF Quote
slightly off topic but since you mentioned the 67 M*300, I use this lens with my 645D and a 67 1.4x extender, and without a gimbal type head, find it wanting to tilt back, the camera end being heaviest.
Yeah, I have that lens too. I really like it but don't shoot it that much. For me, the thing with a medium format film camera and a figital workflow is that you have film flatness (both in the camera body and scanner - a big problem on my scanner) and the MTF of the optical path which includes the scanner that are often the limiting factor in sharpness of your results.
02-03-2015, 01:53 PM   #23
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For lenses big enough to have a tripod foot, a second support attached to the body makes a significant difference. A monopod from camera to the ground or if possible anchored to a tripod leg is good. Manfrotto makes a long-lens brace specifically for this purpose. The triangle support it creates is very rigid. A second tripod under the body, even a relatively flyweight unit, will almost completely eliminate vibration with a long lens.

02-04-2015, 11:45 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by WPRESTO Quote
A second tripod under the body, even a relatively flyweight unit, will almost completely eliminate vibration with a long lens.
What you say is true, however using a second tripod for a lens like the 600 Takumar is a major pain. A monopod is much less aggravation.
02-04-2015, 04:40 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by desertscape Quote
What you say is true, however using a second tripod for a lens like the 600 Takumar is a major pain. A monopod is much less aggravation.
The Bogen brace is even better. Goes from a tripod leg to camera body, has a quick release for changing length and pivots at each end. Cannot swing/pan too much but it's about as convenient as it gets for a double support.
02-10-2015, 07:16 AM   #26
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Have been using Really Right Stuff support for years now and am still on my original tripod TVC 33 and head BH55, I am amazed at the abuse this gear can take. Have recently gone to 645Z with 28-45, the BH55 supports it easily. Its not cheap but the way I see it is I wont scrimp on a support system that holds 15K worth of gear, plus at a 50MP res it needs to held very steady for optimal sharpness..
02-10-2015, 05:51 PM   #27
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Really Right Stuff Rocks

On vacation now shooting with a 645z and a Really Right Stuff:

TVC-34L Versa Series 3 Tripod
&
BH-55 Full Size Ballhead
&
TA-3-LB-HK Leveling Base
&
one on each mount point 645D
&
TQB-89: Extra large tripod bag

It's an INSANELY expensive package. Kind of ridiculous. I built it up over a period of over a year. And their website is quite confusing. Just call them and they can walk you through it.

And they are always on back-order.

BUT - the stuff is fantastic. This is the only tripod I'll be using for the next 20+ years. I have an Induro (going on ebay soon)... Really nice but the Really Right Stuff is way more stable. I suspect this thing will outlast my kids. Rock solid. The thing that stinks is that it looks kind of flashy. Was going to try to beat this up some more as it looks as expensive as it was. But it's great gear. Just wish it wasn't so expensive.

S
02-11-2015, 09:27 AM   #28
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Lots of great info guys. I just got the heads up that my RRS gear should arrive on Friday, roughly two weeks after placing the order. A little bit of a wait, but not too bad at all.
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