Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
09-06-2015, 09:49 AM   #1
Senior Member




Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 196
6x7 Metering Prism

I had a 6x7 with the standard prism in the past. I'm getting ready to procure another but this one has the metering prism. Somewhere I read you have to remove or lift the metered-prism unit off before changing the lens. Why or is that true?




09-06-2015, 10:58 AM   #2
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Arizona
Posts: 912
You do not need to remove the TTL prism when changing lenses. If you are removing the prism for some reason, you will need to remove the lens and reattach to reengage the metering mechanism.
09-06-2015, 11:06 AM   #3
Senior Member




Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 196
Original Poster
That shows how the great web can misconstrue things. One fellow said his chain broke because he failed to take the prism off when he changed lens. That's probably where I got that.
09-08-2015, 09:35 PM   #4
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,103
You can read the official procedure on how to remove and replace the prism in the Pentax 6x7 TTL Pentaprism Finder operation manual

My not so popular view from almost 30 years of shooting a Pentax 6x7 is to reconfigure it to a more advanced and lightweight configuration. No funky wooden handle and no prism just a waist level finder. And if you want to improve selecting the best middle gray exposure for any given scene supporting your vision, don't use the metered prism. Use a one-degree spot meter instead.

09-09-2015, 08:57 AM   #5
Senior Member




Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 196
Original Poster
I had a Pentax Spotmeter V years ago but didn't use it much and so, sold it. Today, like most things I've traded/sold, I'd like to have it back...especially the digital one they once had.
09-16-2015, 12:54 PM   #6
New Member




Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 22
QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
You can read the official procedure on how to remove and replace the prism in the Pentax 6x7 TTL Pentaprism Finder operation manual

My not so popular view from almost 30 years of shooting a Pentax 6x7 is to reconfigure it to a more advanced and lightweight configuration. No funky wooden handle and no prism just a waist level finder. And if you want to improve selecting the best middle gray exposure for any given scene supporting your vision, don't use the metered prism. Use a one-degree spot meter instead.
Interesting...I'll bite. The funky-ness of that handle is what draws me to that camera...wood on a camera? A real conversation starter! I suppose then the question is whether I am out there for pictures or conversation???

I'd really appreciate you following up on the waist level finder idea. I envision using the 67 as a big slr...up to my eye. You use it out in the field another way, correct? And how much weight are we talking about?

Thanks for the ideas...I'd love a "compact" MF slr....

Dave
09-16-2015, 02:56 PM   #7
Senior Member




Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 196
Original Poster
Many years ago we went on an East Coast tour from Virginia to Niagara Falls. We toured Kodak Park, Gettysburg and got lots shots at the Falls and Gettysburg especially. Got some great shots at Ogunquit, Maine as well. I used the 6x7 hand held the whole time and don't recall getting one blurred image but I always tried to shoot at 125 with the 45mm lens and 250 with all others...it worked. Tripods are for night shots, portraits and weddings-vacation, not.
09-16-2015, 09:05 PM   #8
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,103
QuoteOriginally posted by daveward Quote
...
I'd really appreciate you following up on the waist level finder idea. I envision using the 67 as a big slr...up to my eye. You use it out in the field another way, correct? And how much weight are we talking about?

Thanks for the ideas...I'd love a "compact" MF slr....

Dave

Well, first let me say the following: Imagine a sports photographer talking to a landscape photographer about what is the best camera, lenses and shooting style. And on top of that each of these two people assumes that the other person uses their camera for the same purpose as them. They probably won't agree on much and each will most likely think the other person is crazy as they walk away from a frustrating conversation.

So, yes, I shoot it like a TLR when handhold and a view camera when on a tripod. The Pentax 6x7 is not my only medium format film camera. I have three different medium format film camera brands. So I have the liberty of using them in different ways/roles.

If you don't need to follow things often while looking through the view finder, you can save on some bulk by taking the prism off. But some people will finder it harder to use. I find it easy now. I like the 100% view and the magnifying glass which helps me focus better. Sometimes slower to use but like I said, I have a medium format rangefinder that does well as a street type camera and is much, much lighter.

The following picture taken during a sailboat race proved the wooden handle and prism can be very useful. I was on the low side heeled over just as much as the boat passing us all while bouncing around. The wooden handle helped a lot here but I'm sure I could have gotten the shot without it too.





09-16-2015, 09:28 PM   #9
New Member




Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 22
QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Well, first let me say the following: Imagine a sports photographer talking to a landscape photographer about what is the best camera, lenses and shooting style. And on top of that each of these two people assumes that the other person uses their camera for the same purpose as them. They probably won't agree on much and each will most likely think the other person is crazy as they walk away from a frustrating conversation.

So, yes, I shoot it like a TLR when handhold and a view camera when on a tripod. The Pentax 6x7 is not my only medium format film camera. I have three different medium format film camera brands. So I have the liberty of using them in different ways/roles.

If you don't need to follow things often while looking through the view finder, you can save on some bulk by taking the prism off. But some people will finder it harder to use. I find it easy now. I like the 100% view and the magnifying glass which helps me focus better. Sometimes slower to use but like I said, I have a medium format rangefinder that does well as a street type camera and is much, much lighter.

The following picture taken during a sailboat race proved the wooden handle and prism can be very useful. I was on the low side heeled over just as much as the boat passing us all while bouncing around. The wooden handle helped a lot here but I'm sure I could have gotten the shot without it too.



Thanks for the insight. In my research thinking about which camera to buy after a very long absence from the hobby, I have the luxury of reading all the various points and counter-points on the internet...which wasn't available in the good ol days. The abundance of opinions...few in agreement...does tend to cloud the issue. Then...I tripped and fell for medium format. Also something I never would have come upon in those older times.

I've been trying to explain to the wife why having only one camera will be limiting. Apparently there is no correlation between cameras and women's shoes.
09-16-2015, 10:26 PM   #10
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,103
QuoteOriginally posted by daveward Quote
...
I've been trying to explain to the wife why having only one camera will be limiting. Apparently there is no correlation between cameras and women's shoes.
Epic


I'd like to point out one more shot. I shot this handhold dog portrait with the waist level finder and I had little time to compose and focus as that dog wasn't going to stand still for very long. But I got the eyes in focus and holding the camera at a low angle was easy with a WLF too. With no light meter I used the Sunny 11 Rule and that made taking the picture faster because I didn't have to spend time looking at a meter.

And you can actually be kind of sneaky (except for the loud shutter sound) taking a picture with a WLF out on the street. With the camera hanging from your neck you can look down to compose, shoot and people won't notice as much because you don't have the camera up to your eye.


09-17-2015, 12:36 PM   #11
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Arizona
Posts: 912
Back when the P67 was used as a pro camera, many of the shooters had more than one body. In many cases, the shooter had a WLF on one and a TTL prism on the other. There was almost always different film types in the different bodies as well. It is nice to have 100% of the scene shown in the finder. The TTL's cropped edges take some getting used to.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
645d, 645z, 6x7, camera, medium format, prism
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pentax 67 TTL light metering prism is not working sunshine7913 Pentax Medium Format 2 03-06-2015 08:27 AM
P67 TTL prism not metering correctly? noodle0 Pentax Medium Format 5 09-17-2011 10:51 PM
6X7 Metered Prism ugadog Pentax Medium Format 7 09-16-2011 11:36 AM
Pentax 6x7 TTL Prism? carsonbm Pentax Medium Format 3 11-07-2010 05:50 AM
LX metering without prism nickthetasmaniac Pentax Film SLR Discussion 6 09-06-2010 06:09 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:39 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top