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02-20-2016, 03:01 PM - 1 Like   #1
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Medium format newbie

Inherited a Yashica 635 TLR from my Grandfather and it looks to have barely been used.

The 120 from B&H can't get here fast enough! I have only done 35mm prior to this.

I will be developing at home, scanning using an epson flatbed, and hopefully posting some photos in the B&W / Color threads.

I have watched a youtube video on how to load it, doesn't look too bad.

Will this lead to me wanting a Pentax 67? Every single shot on flickr etc where i see a certain 'look' always ends up being the 105 f/2.4.... I think I can spot them in any lineup...

02-20-2016, 05:33 PM - 1 Like   #2
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Congrats. It's fine camera to break you into 120 roll film

There is not a lot of automation to help you so you might really feel like you took a picture sometimes. TLRs take some getting use to but in time you might not even notice the backward scene so much. If you try and look at the scene in the view as shapes and forms you're placing in a square frame it can help distract you from noticing that things are backwards. I shoot my Pentax 6x7 like a TLR with its waist level finder (aka folding hood) all the time.

Last edited by tuco; 02-20-2016 at 05:45 PM.
02-20-2016, 06:14 PM - 1 Like   #3
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You might find yourself longing for more lenses to work with than what the Yashica offers. The Pentax 67 has 30 optically different lenses, all designed for pro use. The most recent designs are really well corrected. The 6x7 was designed as a field camera but can be used in the studio in a pinch. Years ago it was famous as a landscape camera but in the past 10 years, it is gaining a reputation for black and white portraits. The 105mm is all the rage right now but the system has several other fast lenses well suited for portraits. The 150 Takumar and 165 f/2.8 come to mind. The 4x5 aspect ratio of the 6x7 may be a benefit to you but it is a personal preference really.
02-20-2016, 07:38 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by desertscape Quote
You might find yourself longing for more lenses to work with than what the Yashica offers. The Pentax 67 has 30 optically different lenses, all designed for pro use. The most recent designs are really well corrected. The 6x7 was designed as a field camera but can be used in the studio in a pinch. Years ago it was famous as a landscape camera but in the past 10 years, it is gaining a reputation for black and white portraits. The 105mm is all the rage right now but the system has several other fast lenses well suited for portraits. The 150 Takumar and 165 f/2.8 come to mind. The 4x5 aspect ratio of the 6x7 may be a benefit to you but it is a personal preference really.
Lots of pros used TLRs.
Your big problem will be getting the film unto developer tank reel without clinch marks that is just practice practice ILFORD PHOTO - Processing a Black & White film
You can get most of the kit for free or second hand.
Google 'sunny side 16'

02-20-2016, 08:59 PM   #5
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Thanks Xmas, I have been doing everything 35mm for a few years now, so not new to film.

As to moving on / up to 67 later on, the nice thing about all this used gear is you can tend to buy smartly and then get very close to what you put into it within a year or so. One thing at a time, however :-) TLR first up...
02-21-2016, 02:53 AM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jamey777 Quote
Thanks Xmas, I have been doing everything 35mm for a few years now, so not new to film.

One thing at a time, however :-) <snip> TLR first up...
You can load 35mm on to a reel in the dark!
120 is way more difficult.
If you have a choice a 6x7 capable enlarger is desirable, unless you have dry warm storage.
02-21-2016, 06:04 AM   #7
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I use metal reels for 35mm but decided to pick up the plastic reel system that twist winds on. Will report back... Thanks for the heads up.

I won't be wet printing, only scanning to start.
02-21-2016, 08:31 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jamey777 Quote
I use metal reels for 35mm but decided to pick up the plastic reel system that twist winds on. Will report back... Thanks for the heads up.

I won't be wet printing, only scanning to start.
hated those twist reels, got real good at the metal ones - better than 35. Plus stainless steel had less chance of chemical contamination as I always thought they cleaned better.

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