Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
03-02-2016, 11:33 PM   #1
Veteran Member




Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: 11432
Photos: Albums
Posts: 382
Pentax film medium format workflow

I currently using Pentax 67 with three lenses since 2014. Well I love it and it was my first mf that I ever used before. However, I always had a problem with focusing due to dark viewfinder and screen. Pentax 67ii solved both issues but I can not afford to change it. But the focusing issue is quite critical unless I use over f5.6 or f8. Re-composing with my camera does not work well since 105mm f/2.4 is quite fast lens that I have to carefully focus it. I did think about Pentax 645N or Nii but I don't even have budgets to purchase it. Money is quite an issue but I can not just shoot pics with Pentax 67 unless I use tripod with f8 or higher. I bought a WLF but I realized that the screen is also quite dark and can not use vertically(I shoot vertically a lot) What should I do to solve this issue? I didn't and couldn't shoot at wide open for several months already.

Should I...

1. Buy Pentax 67ii?
2. Buy Pentax 645N?
3. Figure out another way?
4. Else?

And I need help with film developing and scanning. I send my films to the lab in NYC. They do normally. Well when I pics from other labs such as richard, they have better color and tones. I tried scanning and then correcting color like richard lab did but never ever achieved. Will it be worth it to send films to that kind of pro labs for film developing and scanning?


Last edited by rlatjsrud; 03-02-2016 at 11:53 PM.
03-03-2016, 12:35 AM   #2
New Member




Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 6
I've had the same focusing problems with my Pentax 6x7, so I bought the viewfinder magnifier accessory. Problem solved.

Unless you have several thousand dollars for a high end scanner, a good commercial laboratory will do a better job of scanning your film.

Setting up a dark room can be a complex task. I have a JOBO CPP-2 drum developing system. I recommend it highly, although it is expensive. My enlarger is custom-made. So, I cannot really comment on standard enlargers.
03-03-2016, 01:19 AM   #3
Site Supporter
Alex645's Avatar

Join Date: May 2015
Location: Kaneohe, HI
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,342
Normally something like a Beattie Intenscreen or Maxwell focusing screen has the reputation of giving you a brighter finder, but most photographers report that on their 67, it's creates even more vignetting and is minimally brighter in the center, therefore not a solution for you. How's your eyesight? Do you need a diopter for the viewfinder? If not, I honestly can't think of a solution with your current 67 other than bracketing focus.

67II? Pro: Solve your problem, can use your present lenses, maintain large 6x7 MF negs. Con: Expensive, the hassle of selling of your 67.
645N? Pro: Solves your problem, cheaper than 67II, respectable MF, 15-16 shots per 120 roll. Con: Hassle of selling your 67, need to replace lenses in competitive markets with 645D and 645Z owners, neg is almost 40% smaller than 67, the 75mm f/2.8 (equivalent to your 105mm f/2.4) won't have the same amount of shallow depth of field due to focal length, aperture, smaller format.

So in terms of cameras, you need to ask yourself to what degree can you afford not to upgrade? How critical is it to have the 67 size vs. a 645 size? Personally I love the 645 because I can shoot with it all day in the field without a tripod and they are much cheaper than the AF 645N....if you can live without AF. With my 75mm f/2.8 or 35mm f/3.5, I find the finder bright enough, although others with slower lenses do complain about the dark finder.

For developing B&W, I find that I can do it better myself, and cheaper, than any lab. Scanning, however, is more problematic. I am lucky because I have access to a MF film scanner (Minolta Dimage Scan Multi Pro), but for much less with only a little loss in quality, I've seen others use an Epson flatbed scanner (1/4-1/5 the price) with a MF film holder. For color, there is no magic bullet other than a great lab that prides itself in quality and treats your film like a national treasure.

My two favorite labs are http://aandi.com/film and Homepage ยป thefindlab.com

For anyone on a budget, neither are cheap, but I have learned the hard way that there is no point in sending your precious film to a lab that will disappoint you. It's the price of shooting MF and considering what it would cost for you to upgrade to a 645D, MF film is still a great value unless you're a working pro and speed is essential in your workflow.
If you've got more time than money, explore if there are any community colleges or universities with 'outreach' night classes with access to a lab and/or exceptional hardware.

One last perspective: There are limits to how good a scan anyone can get from a $600 Epson flatbed scanner vs. a $2500 MF Minolta/Nikon/Braun/Plustek/Pacific Image film scanner vs. a $10K Noritsu film scanner vs. a $20K Hasselblad drum scanner. Sending your film to a good lab with high quality control management will exceed the quality you can get with all the personal effort and time you invest with a prosumer level scanner and software.
03-03-2016, 06:03 AM   #4
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,103
Does the view finder get darker the more you stop the lens down? That is, is it darker at f8 than f4?

03-03-2016, 07:10 AM   #5
Senior Member




Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 219
Get the 67II. Yes it's expensive but it's one of the best cameras ever made. Jon Canlas, owner of the FINDlab which I'm about to recommend, has switched from Contax 645 to all Pentax 67II bodies and a myriad of Pentax and adapted lenses. It's a freaking fantastic machine and you will love it.

Also, start using The FIND Lab. They're great, you will love the scans, and they are much cheaper than Richards. YOu can even save some MORE money by getting 'basic'scans, but they require a little processing when you get them. Follow Jon Canlas on instagram to see what he's been doing with his 67II. If that doesn't convince you nothing will haha. Enjoy it!
03-03-2016, 07:29 AM   #6
Pentaxian
ffking's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Poole
Posts: 1,868
To be honest, I never noticed much difference between the 67 and the 67ii in terms of focusing - I tended to use the folding magnifying hood for composition any way (a lot cheaper than the rigid one, and you can flip the magnifier off to see the ground glass for overall composition). It means you have to keep whipping the metering prism on and off, or work with a hand held meter, but I never had problems focusing brightness wise using it. Only problem is that you've made me get the bodies out to check, and I've fallen in love with them again ;D
03-03-2016, 09:21 AM   #7
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 27,444
QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Does the view finder get darker the more you stop the lens down? That is, is it darker at f8 than f4?
My question as well.


Steve
03-03-2016, 12:34 PM   #8
Veteran Member
disconnekt's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Riverside, CA
Posts: 504
Found this site a few weeks ago that list's places that develops film (as far as scanning, you'll have to check the specific site):
Photo Labs and Darkrooms ? I shoot film.

Hope it helps if you choose to look around at other places.

03-03-2016, 01:33 PM   #9
Site Supporter
Alex645's Avatar

Join Date: May 2015
Location: Kaneohe, HI
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,342
QuoteOriginally posted by disconnekt Quote
Found this site a few weeks ago that list's places that develops film (as far as scanning, you'll have to check the specific site):
Photo Labs and Darkrooms ? I shoot film.
That can be helpful, but beware one of the very best labs, The FIND (film is not dead) Lab in Ogden, Utah is not listed and one the worst labs I've ever used, Hawaii Pacific Photo is listed.
03-03-2016, 09:05 PM   #10
Veteran Member
disconnekt's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Riverside, CA
Posts: 504
Yeah, the only thing I would like to see added to that site is a "review" type system for the labs on the site.
03-03-2016, 10:07 PM   #11
Veteran Member




Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: 11432
Photos: Albums
Posts: 382
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Focalplane Quote
I've had the same focusing problems with my Pentax 6x7, so I bought the viewfinder magnifier accessory. Problem solved.

Unless you have several thousand dollars for a high end scanner, a good commercial laboratory will do a better job of scanning your film.

Setting up a dark room can be a complex task. I have a JOBO CPP-2 drum developing system. I recommend it highly, although it is expensive. My enlarger is custom-made. So, I cannot really comment on standard enlargers.
I used that before but it's not that helpful. The size of it made me hard to take pics and if I do recomposing, then it's meaningless. It's just for fine focusing.
03-05-2016, 10:58 PM   #12
Veteran Member
Silent Street's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Geelong & Richmond, Vic AUS
Posts: 547
The Pentax 67 and earlier 6x7 bodies are fitted with a fairly course matte focusing screen which is a little challenging to focus at f4 and higher. Spare a thought for those photographers, among them myself, who use a polariser! I get around the focusing with one or more of a) removal of polariser to facilitate "brighter" focusing, b) use of Pentax central-spot viewfinder magnifier or c) use of the Pentax 67 right angle finder.

The central-spot viewfinder magnifier flips out of the way to facilitate full-area focusing and composition, and is then placed down to facilitate fine-focusing. Depth of field will not always take care of small focusing errors.

Scan types need to be specified at the scan-step: what are you going to use the scans for? If for screen, medium resolution unprofiled JPEGs and PNG files are fine. If you are intending to print, then scans for that will be very involved and can be expensive, and if everything is done very competently in a professional lab known for quality, the prints will be unbelievably beautiful (a hallmark of the Pentax 67 system). But amateurs often fluff the image at the concept stage, much less what they intend to do later with scanning. So it's vital to know what you are going to be doing before you send files in for scanning. Low to medium resolution scans don't print as well as those scans made explicitly for print output. I know this from 35 years experience.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
645d, 645n, 645z, 67ii, camera, f8, film medium format, issue, medium format, pentax, pentax film medium, screen
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
People Sibyl (film, 35mm and medium format) alan_smithee_photos Post Your Photos! 7 07-22-2015 02:53 PM
Post your non-pentax medium-format and large-format pictures DenisG Non-Pentax Cameras: Canon, Nikon, etc. 25 04-07-2015 03:55 PM
Replicate Light Leaks on Medium Format Film? Hannican Photographic Technique 5 02-02-2015 06:05 PM
Not Work-Safe Lauren Pt 1 - medium format film alan_smithee_photos Post Your Photos! 13 07-18-2014 09:42 AM
Not Work-Safe Brooke Eva (35mm and medium format film) alan_smithee_photos Post Your Photos! 5 05-09-2014 10:40 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:23 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top