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05-20-2017, 01:01 PM   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by jwatts Quote
I shoot 90% of my images at f16/16.5 on the other lenses or F/22 on the 200.

That's very useful info--a bit daunting, though, since I imagine that reciprocity failure starts coming into play.

05-20-2017, 10:15 PM   #32
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I agree with the foregoing post by Desertscape regarding the use of depth of field scales on lenses; in actual practice though I haven't found any glaring errors there, but then I employ hyperfocal with the 45, 55 and sometimes the 75mm lenses ( the 45 and to a lesser degree, the 55, both have good near-far DofF and so are forgiving of small errors). Again, the 45 and 55 will soften at deep Avs (f22 particularly).

Consider that I have not shot anything beyond f11 (+0.5) or f16 (+0.5) for years and years. I'm not alone.

I am very conscious (and learned) of the presence of, and effects of, 5ABS (five aberrations of Seidel). In my beginner days (late 1970s) I screwed many otherwise good photos by stopping down lenses to f22...f32 with nothing gained other than softening and coma and fringing. True, some lenses, notably macro and telephoto, will require deeper Avs than f16 (down to f32) and by design they work well like this. But it does not necessarily follow that stopping a lens that far down on each and every lens in your kit guarantees the better results, other than extended depth of field. Optics can be corrected and compensate for some faults at deeper apertures, but to treat 93% of naturally occurring faults requires spending serious money e.g. the 67 75 2.8AL or the 300 IF ED.

If you want to get into really, really deep Av territory, take up large format as a disclipine, where Avs are often found going down, down to f45 ... f64...
05-21-2017, 05:46 AM   #33
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Food for thought, SS--I'm thinking too that everyone's unique environment/terrain will have an effect on these kinds of choices as well. (BTW, I thought of you last week while I was setting up in my temperate rain forest here in the Southern Appalachia's--my chimney finder fogged up every time I leaned down to focus, and all I could think was that Silent Street would know what to do...)
05-21-2017, 03:10 PM   #34
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I originally brought a 67II with a view to using with long lenses in Zoo's as it came up at a good price and I knew where to get the 500mm F5.6 at a good price too however as a 45mm was on the camera I gave it a whirl for landscapes too when I didn't feel like dragging the 10x8 about, at the same time I brought the 500mm I also picked up the 200mm for a good price and the automatic extension tubes then the 55-105mm made sense then some how the 135mm the 165mm and the 300mm because all can be had relatively cheaply I also picked up the 400mm F4 original then somehow ended up with a fetish for the teleconverters as I had accidentally brought the mildly unusual outer bayonet one by mistake. Other useful bits are the refconverter and the x6 finder and the external bayonet tubes. The 55-105 is probably the most used followed by the 45 and then oddly enough the 500mm for distant landscapes.

As a rule of thumb I avoid going below F22 with the 67 but on the subject of diffraction it's still there with LF and with 5x4 would generally not go beyond F32 and with 10x8 F45 but rarely needed to go there because of all the fun things you can do with movements

A 67 shot with the 500mm
The original was drum scanned at 4800dpi the original size on flickr is a bit downsized from that.

For kicks a 750mm on 10x8 at F32 with some tilt

05-21-2017, 03:42 PM   #35
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QuoteOriginally posted by CreationBear Quote
Food for thought, SS--I'm thinking too that everyone's unique environment/terrain will have an effect on these kinds of choices as well. (BTW, I thought of you last week while I was setting up in my temperate rain forest here in the Southern Appalachia's--my chimney finder fogged up every time I leaned down to focus, and all I could think was that Silent Street would know what to do...)

LOL! Uncle Garyh doesn't have a magic cure for fogginess (either for my mind or glass...)
Yep. Fogging of lenses and viewfinders is the single biggest challenge out there in the dim, dank and dark of the rainforests; often I pull back (because I get grumbly and have missed my due distemper shot) and sit under a tree fern and brew up a cuppa to contemplate the meaning of life... But in my kit I have an anti-fog cloth bought for $3.00 at my optometrist; a wipe on the front filter and the viewfinder keeps fog at bay. And then a few wipes of glasses so I can see what I am writing in the exposure record. The fact this tiny scrap of treated fabric is orange in colour means it stands out like a proverbial sore thumb if I drop in somewhere!

We are heading into ever so shorter hours way down here, and there is not likely to be much done in the forests now for a couple of months at least, because darkness falls at 3.45pm in the afternoon in the gorges. It's also bone-chillingly cold.
05-21-2017, 04:24 PM   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by Silent Street Quote
anti-fog cloth bought for $3.00 at my optometrist; a wipe on the front filter and the viewfinder keeps fog at bay

Ha, one or more will make it into my bag this week--I must admit, though, that it was like a pretty good practical joke, having everything white-out each time I bent down over the camera.
05-24-2017, 06:50 AM   #37
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I reviewed hyperfocal distances this weekend and I believe I grasp the concept well enough to apply it now. It definitely takes a lot of mystery out of focusing for landscapes. It seems that most people agree that f/16 is about the limit for getting the sharpest possible images with the 55mm f/4, which I will be using on my trip to Seattle. I also will remember to adjust the focus slightly to ensure that infinity is sharp. Thank you for all the advice. Hopefully I get good results with my current kit - I hope I don't want or need to buy more gear afterwards!

The next thing I need to learn about is reciprocity failure. I imagine at f/16 in the Seattle clouds I'll need to take some long exposures and I need to learn how to do that effectively.
05-24-2017, 06:55 PM   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by Femto1969 Quote
I reviewed hyperfocal distances this weekend and I believe I grasp the concept well enough to apply it now. It definitely takes a lot of mystery out of focusing for landscapes. It seems that most people agree that f/16 is about the limit for getting the sharpest possible images with the 55mm f/4, which I will be using on my trip to Seattle. I also will remember to adjust the focus slightly to ensure that infinity is sharp. Thank you for all the advice. Hopefully I get good results with my current kit - I hope I don't want or need to buy more gear afterwards!

The next thing I need to learn about is reciprocity failure. I imagine at f/16 in the Seattle clouds I'll need to take some long exposures and I need to learn how to do that effectively.

While the scale is there on lenses for a purpose, and is reasonably accurate in application, a simple and fast method of hyperfocal is to focus at a point a third of the way in and let the Av take care of the rest. Bracket your shots and several Av clicks, including half stops, and take a note of any softening that is introduced the deeper you go.

Reciprocity failure is more of a problem with slow speed films (particularly Velvia 50 that I work with) and Provia 100F in low light requiring long exposures rather than deep Avs; ACROS 100 is one of the famously unfussed emulsions that has excellent reciprocity and has never given me grief.

05-25-2017, 06:53 AM   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by Silent Street Quote
While the scale is there on lenses for a purpose, and is reasonably accurate in application, a simple and fast method of hyperfocal is to focus at a point a third of the way in and let the Av take care of the rest. Bracket your shots and several Av clicks, including half stops, and take a note of any softening that is introduced the deeper you go.

Reciprocity failure is more of a problem with slow speed films (particularly Velvia 50 that I work with) and Provia 100F in low light requiring long exposures rather than deep Avs; ACROS 100 is one of the famously unfussed emulsions that has excellent reciprocity and has never given me grief.
Thank you. I'm now trying to determine which film I should start off with. I bought a 10 pack of Ultrafine because it was the cheapest. Now I am seeing that I should me much more strategic about what kind of film I use. Since I will be shooting landscapes in Seattle and I want to turn the keepers into large print wallhangers I may want to buy film that has a high lines/mm and has decent reciprocity. Do you have any recommendations or good resources for evaluating/reviewing film?
05-25-2017, 04:22 PM   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by Femto1969 Quote
Thank you. I'm now trying to determine which film I should start off with. I bought a 10 pack of Ultrafine because it was the cheapest. Now I am seeing that I should me much more strategic about what kind of film I use. Since I will be shooting landscapes in Seattle and I want to turn the keepers into large print wallhangers I may want to buy film that has a high lines/mm and has decent reciprocity. Do you have any recommendations or good resources for evaluating/reviewing film?

Ultrafine is not available or known of here in Australia as much as so many other Fuji, Kodak, Ilford, Burgger etc.
Your film choice should also be governed by the lighting conditions you routinely shoot in out of habit, for example, Velvia 50 looks frankly, bloody awful in bright sunlight, but carries its own wonderfully in the early morning or evening light, which by nature, is softer. Portra is one film that comes to mind that responds well to a variety of lighting conditions. Lots of choices in B&W, but it has never appealed to me in cityscapes or nature landscapes except if there is a very, very promising scene that will actually workin B&W over colour.

Just remember to be careful with exposure with the Pentax 67 and use mirror lock-up as an adjunct to eliminate vibration e.g. tripod + MLU + shutter trip. Wallhangers are not the best idea if the images are fouled by very noticeable blur, as one of mine was recently. P67 lenses are reliable performers that deliver stellar results with proper, considered technique. Exploit them to good effect!
05-26-2017, 01:45 PM - 1 Like   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by Femto1969 Quote
I'm hoping that I can use it for landscapes in Seattle of islands and mountains and such.
I would start out with Provia 100F as it is moderately saturated without being offensive. It has a super fine grain so it can be enlarged greatly. Velvia 100 has problems in landscape work due to it shifting the color palette to the red end of the spectrum. It does well for fall colors and lightning shots tho. I don't like how it scans. Provia 400X works well if you need the speed, as when wind is causing motion problems in the scene. It is very fine grained for a 400 film. Velvia 50 works well on scenes that are not saturated. Saturated scenes can be a problem. It is fine grained and scans well.
05-26-2017, 01:52 PM   #42
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I'm definitely planning on using a tripod, the MLU and a shutter release cable. I'm practicing all of those before my trip! Thanks for the advice and film recommendations.
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