Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
09-25-2009, 11:41 PM   #1
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 394
First 67 scans

Hi all,
Finally got around to doing some scans, all done with epson V700 at 2400dpi, fuji neopan b/w film and taken with Pentax 67ii with 45mm.
Cheers Neil








Last edited by knumbnutz; 09-25-2009 at 11:54 PM.
09-26-2009, 01:11 AM   #2
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 26,190
Beautiful!

'nuff said...

Steve
09-26-2009, 12:59 PM   #3
Site Supporter




Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: MT
Posts: 1,075
Very nice! Gotta love that 45mm!

A light green filter might help create different tones in the vegetation in the two waterfall shots? Presuming there are different shades of green in the plants...
09-26-2009, 02:20 PM   #4
Veteran Member




Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Westchester Co., NY
Posts: 538
Nice! I would be curious to know if you've printed them;if so, what size and are you pleased with the results? I'm thinking about an Epson 700 or 750 for scanning MF film.

09-26-2009, 05:17 PM   #5
Veteran Member




Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,915
sweet work, medium format kicks ass
09-26-2009, 05:51 PM   #6
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 394
Original Poster
Thanks for the comments everyone. !


Ron, the 45mm has a lovely perspective and no noticable distortion, maybe just a tad towards the corners but no critical as such. I have never used many filters and really, i have a lot to learn, so i will look up the filters and see what you can with them.

QuoteOriginally posted by Ron Boggs Quote
Very nice! Gotta love that 45mm!

A light green filter might help create different tones in the vegetation in the two waterfall shots? Presuming there are different shades of green in the plants...

Peter,
The V700 has way too many options and this was my first use of it. Made some booboo's along the way too. The best thing about the epson is it is reasonably quick and to be honest the scanner (at this stage) at 4800dpi seems to out resolve the negative.
Now that may seem bad at first thought, but unlike JPEGs and RAW files from cameras, the COC or smallest dot is smooth and without jagged edges. This means in reality, printing to larger sizes should be a lot better as it will not show harsh pixels but rather smooth transitions much like bokeh.
I have the same images from K20D, as in just changed the mounting plate from 67 to K20D and took a comparison photo. I dont do brick walls or newspaper PP just real tangable comparison which i hope will to some degree show which is best.

FWIW the 4800dpi scan took about 2mins and the 2400dpi took about 1min.
The 2400dpi is around 6500 pixels wide x 5000 pixels high. So that equates to a 32mp image.

I'll be trying some printing soon, i'll let you know how it turns out.
Cheers Neil


QuoteOriginally posted by PeterAM Quote
Nice! I would be curious to know if you've printed them;if so, what size and are you pleased with the results? I'm thinking about an Epson 700 or 750 for scanning MF film.
09-26-2009, 10:47 PM   #7
Site Supporter




Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: MT
Posts: 1,075
Here's what an old B&H Professional Photo Sourcebook catalog from 10 years ago says in the B+W brand filter section of Black and White filters:
Yellow Green 060 (11)--Ideal for scenes where it is important to differentiate the green tonal values. The application is especially suited to landscape photography in the springtime, because it enhances the light green color of the leaves. Due to its favorable effect on red tones, this filter is also suitable for portraits or group pictures taken in natural light.
Green 061 (13)--This dark green filter creates differentiation of green tones in late spring and summer. It is also recommended for floral pictures that are used graphically, for tonal separations in still-life photography and for the correction of red tones in portraits with high-speed film.

Additionally in the Tiffen section titled Filters for Black and White Film there is a narrative which includes the comment, "keep in mind that filters allow light of their own color to pass through while filtering out complementary colors--thus lightening objects of their own color and darkening those of the complementary color."
#58 Dark Green Filter--lightens dark foliage considerably. Helps to achieve high contrast effects in photo-microscopy.
#61 Dark Green Filter--The best filter when you want to lighten green foliage to a maximum degree.

Point of all this is that green or light green filters lighten green foliage and help distinguish the subtle tones of various plant species to help each stand out more distinctly in a mixed foliage situation. Green filters lighten the green subjects and darken the reddish ones. Red filters darken green foliage significantly while making red tones lighter.

Hope this helps! BTW your foliage is very interesting to me--kind of a botany head thing--and I just want to see it even better
09-27-2009, 04:00 PM   #8
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 394
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Ron Boggs Quote
Hope this helps! BTW your foliage is very interesting to me--kind of a botany head thing--and I just want to see it even better
Thanks Ron for the info.
Funnily enough I have a colour image which I just love and I hope at some stage (tasmania is across the sea and some 400miles away) i can get there again with the 67 and do some colour shots, bigger and better than this one.

Here is the image taken with the K20D -


Sometimes though b/w landscapes really make the scene and this is why i used b/w for this trip. Just to see where it will take me and how the scene compares to the colour shot.

Also i think, what with PS and PP and the settings available on the scanner, colour will give me more flexability than b/w alone but filters will help as well, just too many possiblities and choices......

Great stuff.
Cheers Neil

09-27-2009, 04:11 PM   #9
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 394
Original Poster
Hi ,
I forgot to say at the start, I had prints done at the time of developing and it was enough to make me buy the scanner alone (although i had already made my mind to do so.)
Overexposed and quite lousy, i could see with the naked eye there was more detail in both highlights and shadows in the negatives than the prints.
There is no point getting someone else to do a job that you can do much better yourself.
Is this normal for 6x7 prints ? Sure they were small but.....
Cheers Neil
09-28-2009, 09:07 AM   #10
Site Supporter




Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: MT
Posts: 1,075
Each step in printing exaggerates hot highlights and blocked up shadows. That's why in traditional darkrooms, custom dodging and burning are critical techniques. In fact, dodging and burning are one of the first things they used to teach in photo lab classes back when I took a few...

So actually, custom printing can help moderate the blown highlights and blocked up shadows that you saw in the proof sheet.

That was always one of the problems with color slides to prints as most people did it. You had the original transparency, then an internegative, then the print and with the extra interneg step all the marginal exposure areas got hotter or more blocked up. So extensive custom print work was often called for.

I still only print Cibachrome/Ilfochrome because it is directly printed from the transparency without an interneg which helps flatten the exposure a bit. Sure I still pay for custom dodging and burning on certain images, but that's just the nature of the game. I don't play with black and white anymore--or at least haven't for almost 30 years, but black and white sure works well with some customization in the lab. So your "exposure challenged" proof sheet may not be a true indication of what can be produced in an old school lab. This isn't to disuade you from scanning, just adding to the info you can sift through when making printing decisions.
11-05-2009, 08:43 AM   #11
Veteran Member




Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Westchester Co., NY
Posts: 538
QuoteQuote:
Peter,
The V700 has way too many options and this was my first use of it....................

I'll be trying some printing soon, i'll let you know how it turns out.
Cheers Neil
Knumbnutz (same name as my brother-in-law, but he spells it differently):

Are you at the point where you can share your thoughts/results regarding the V700 and prints from same?

Thanks
11-11-2009, 05:48 AM   #12
Inactive Account




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 87
QuoteQuote:
I'm fairly certain that this is the best thing I've ever seen.
11-11-2009, 06:37 AM   #13
Veteran Member
vievetrick's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Easthampton - Massachusetts - USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 5,175
I love that last shot. great B&W
11-12-2009, 07:48 PM   #14
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 394
Original Poster
Thanks for the Comments !

QuoteOriginally posted by petercrane Quote
I'm fairly certain that this is the best thing I've ever seen.
Thanks !!

QuoteOriginally posted by vievetrick Quote
I love that last shot. great B&W
Thank!!

QuoteOriginally posted by PeterAM Quote
Knumbnutz (same name as my brother-in-law, but he spells it differently):

Are you at the point where you can share your thoughts/results regarding the V700 and prints from same?

Thanks
The Print I did from this has been extraordinary, a revelation.
I had a long lost school buddy who i ran into on facebook....who happened to have 2 large format epson printers and ran me off a print about 20x40 for next to nothing.
So that piece fell into place well !!
The print looks better than the screen shot and has wonderful depth to it.
What more can i say except the exercise has been a long one, but worth it.
Now that i know what i am doing as far as "the process" is concerned, it is relatively easy, not quick but entirely worth it.
Possibly in some circumstances you can get away with using a digital camera and stitching but film this size still has its place and scanning is essential to make the most of it.
Cheers Neil
11-13-2009, 09:15 AM   #15
Veteran Member




Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Westchester Co., NY
Posts: 538
That's a beautiful picture; glad the print turned out well. Can you share your scanning technique with the V700? I'm considering that scanner and am pretty finicky about my print quality;won't spring for a $2,000+ Nikon.

Thanks.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, medium format, scans
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
poor prints from scans Sluggo Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 5 03-29-2010 08:43 AM
Black & White More Tri-X scans ve2vfd Post Your Photos! 0 12-23-2009 09:15 PM
My first scans! BernardMarx Pentax Film SLR Discussion 5 06-23-2009 05:26 PM
Some more of Siberia (scans) Rense Post Your Photos! 7 02-23-2009 02:54 PM
Autumn scans JMR Post Your Photos! 9 02-17-2009 04:48 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:56 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top