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05-07-2010, 02:29 PM   #16
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Ok. Thank you. That helped a lot. And yeah the main reason I was considering getting another telephoto lens instead of the dual lens kit with the K-x is so I could save up money for the second lens while enjoying the K-x in the meantime

05-07-2010, 03:50 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Chriswirth930 Quote
Thank you for all the replies so far. In response to the dual lens kt. I was able to find a white kx (color I want the most) for $460 while the lowest i could find the white kx with the 55-300mm lens is $720. I am aware after reading that the 55-300mm lens is of great quality. My question on this matter however is

1: In general travel photography such as my vacation to New York will there be a lot I won't be able to capture if I only had the kit lens vs. the 55-300mm lens?

2: Because the Tamron 70-300mm lens is over $100 cheaper than the kit with the 55-300mm lens would this be a better option for someone on a budget (Quality vs. Price)?

3: If not the Tamron 70-300mm lens, is there another comparable lens I would be able to purchase after the fact that would be of relitive quality to the Pentax 55-300mm lens, such as the sigma 70-300mm lens? (This way I could have the camera while I saved up for the lens as well as explored what type of photos I most like to shoot)
if your first thing to do is a trip to NY then you might enjoy a 12-24 or sigma 10-20 to go along with the kit lens 18-55?

WIde angle is much more important than telephoto (in my opinion) for cities.

For rare and light use a groilla-pod my be better than a tripod, a polarizing filter and UV filter are advised, as it will help out on flair and also darken skies and give richer colors.

Lens hood is important to reduce flair when shooting close to the sun.

other than that, spare memory cards, but you can buy them cheap in ny so maybe get them there.
05-07-2010, 06:55 PM   #18
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^ Cool. Thanks for the advice. I will def check out those two lenses.
05-08-2010, 04:36 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
a polarizing filter and UV filter are advised, as it will help out on flair and also darken skies and give richer colors.
I agree about the Polarizing filter darkening skies and giving richer colours. I don't see any IQ difference with a UV filter on a digital camera and from reading about it, the coatings on dslr's already provide UV shielding, unlike film cameras. I don't use a UV filter any longer after having a shoot spoiled by one. I always always use a hood except with the built-in flash. The hood provides mechanical protection and protects from contrast-reducing stray light, indoors and out.

To the OP, along with the 18-55, I'd be inclined to bring a fast lens I could use indoors without flash. That would be more important to me in a city than a long telephoto. But if you can swing it, a kit made up of the 18-55, a telephoto and a fast prime equips you for almost anything.

05-08-2010, 06:40 AM   #20
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^ what fast prime lens would you suggest for someone on a tight budget?
05-08-2010, 09:26 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by Chriswirth930 Quote
^ what fast prime lens would you suggest for someone on a tight budget?
The cheapest new are probably the Pentax DA 40mm 2.8 and FA 50mm 1.4. There are a gazillion choices in used lenses, some fully manual, some auto aperture and some auto aperture with AF.

A K-x can manage indoors with f2.8 aperture due to its good ISO performance, but a wider aperture has advantages in really dim light and for controlling bokeh. 35 and 40mm are nice focal lengths for all-purpose use. A 50mm FL is fantastic if your primary interest is shooting portraits, a bit long as a general purpose lens. I love the 28mm fov. Auto aperture A 28mm lenses are widely availble for under $100. The lens database on this site is invaluable for help deciding. The kit lens can help you narrow your search to one focal length.
05-08-2010, 10:15 AM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by Chriswirth930 Quote
^ what fast prime lens would you suggest for someone on a tight budget?
The absolute best, cheapest fast standard prime you can get is an old Pentax manual focus Super Takumar 50 1.4 (about $100) or 55 1.8 (about $50).

These are incredible pieces of glass, fast, and will properly introduce you to the world of manual metering, which is where you'll really learn to meter.

These lenses also deliver a film look, which is really, really nice.
05-08-2010, 11:21 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ira Quote
These are incredible pieces of glass, fast, and will properly introduce you to the world of manual metering, which is where you'll really learn to meter.
How does pressing the Green Button teach someone about metering?

I don't understand how shooting in Manual mode with a Pentax DSLR is different than shooting in any other mode. In P, Av and Sv, the camera shows you its suggested settings. You look at what's suggested and keep it or change something. The only difference between auto and manual mode is that you have to hit the Green button in Manual mode to bring up the camera's suggested settings. It's functionally the same. The only differences being that extra step in Manual mode, no auto-ISO and the camera meters more reliably with a modern lens (with AF and aperture contacts).


Last edited by audiobomber; 05-08-2010 at 11:34 AM.
05-08-2010, 02:41 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Chriswirth930 Quote
^ what fast prime lens would you suggest for someone on a tight budget?
I'd recommend the M35/2 or M28/2.8 if you're looking for just one general purpose prime for say $100. If you're specifically looking for portraits, a 50mm would be fine - but otherwise, there's an excellent chance you end up finding it too long too often (although some do really like that focal length). If you've got a little more to spend, the DA40 is the standard first choice for AF primes.

Last edited by Marc Sabatella; 05-09-2010 at 11:22 AM.
05-09-2010, 08:35 AM   #25
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Morning Chris,

You are going down the rabbit hole. Climb back out - you have a budget, 1) stick to it, as you can go broke very easily chasing the lens quality bunny. 2) You are going on vacation, you don't want to be hauling a ton of camera gear around with you, trying to set it up, and not enjoying the vacation with your family and the sights, while trying to figure the new fangled gadget out on the run.

You have the KX and the kit lens. Great choice. You can go nutz, trying to choose a second lens. The DA 50-200 is small, light, relatively cheap and available everywhere. Check out used down in the marketplace here on the Forum - someone usually has one available. You can always sell the lens probably for what you bought it for when you are ready to move on.

You are still learning the camera, forget about all the gadgets. The camera, the lens, a spare set of AA batteries from the drug store (and they are available in NYC), a comfortable bag to carry the stuff around in, and a spare large SD card to store the pictures. That is all you need. I like the suggestion about a hat and comfortable shoes. Add in a healthy dose of patience. You can even use an old backpack - at least it does not look like an expensive camera bag - yelling, come mugg me and steal me.

A tour guide helps (somewhat kidding). In the 70's I was in the Navy where we pulled in to NYC. Walked everywhere - absolutely exhausting! 28 years ago, my wife (then girlfriend) and I went to NYC to see her family and some friends. 5 foot, 90 pound, Italian - nice, charming, thoughtful, pleasant, wonderful girl (tenured at UCSB) I met in Santa Barbara, walked off the plane and turned in to Girlzilla from the Bronx - with an attitude. Opened up the garage and she backs out her old 72 Chevy Chevelle, 350 with 2 - 4 BBL carbs - with an automatic (#$%^& *&&^%$$#). She didn't know anything about other than drive it like a weapon (urban assault vehicle), and the gas when in the opening somewhere in the back.... What a vacation - I was lucky to survive it! I have since found that every time we go back to NYC the attitude returns.


Last edited by interested_observer; 05-09-2010 at 09:02 AM.
05-10-2010, 07:13 AM   #26
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Thank you everyone for their advice. I just have a couple more questions before I purchase my K-x.

1. Should I worry about the shake reduction problem that seems to be heavily talked about?

2. What are the chances that Pentax will offer a new K-x this year

3. Being that I only plan to get a small variety of lenses is the K-x still a better choice over a Micro Four Thirds camera or one such as the too be anounced tomorrow Sony NXT? (and yes I know no one knows how well this camera operates yet)

And the reason why I ask this is because I def want more than a point and shoot and I want to be able to take creative photos of landscapes, cities, and ultimately travel photos but I don't see myself as carying more than one extra lens with me.

Thank you to all. I just want to make sure I make the best purchase for my situation and budget.
05-10-2010, 07:30 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by audiobomber Quote
How does pressing the Green Button teach someone about metering?
Well, I guess it doesn't teach you how to do M metering much more differently than with an auto lens in M, but when you don't have the option to use any automatic modes, it kind of forces you in that direction.

Also, hitting the green button is just your starting point--especially since so many old Taks underexpose. There's also something about manually turning an aperture ring which is more intuitive than playing with buttons.
05-10-2010, 09:00 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by Chriswirth930 Quote
2. What are the chances that Pentax will offer a new K-x this year?
With digital cameras, you have to sort of ignore this possibility, or you'll never buy anything. At some point, there will be a new model and it will be somehow better than the K-x. It will cost 50% more than the K-x when released. Also, after purchasing any digital camera, stop looking at prices for that model or cameras you've seriously considered. They'll be less than you paid. After doing all your research, you have to quit cold-turkey and take photos for a few months.
05-10-2010, 09:25 AM   #29
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^ yeah iv'e learned this the hard way with my macbook lol.

Does anybody have any comments though whether the k-x or a evil camera would be the best for my situation?
05-10-2010, 09:54 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by Chriswirth930 Quote
^ yeah iv'e learned this the hard way with my macbook lol.

Does anybody have any comments though whether the k-x or a evil camera would be the best for my situation?
A Micro 4/3 cam has a smaller sensor. All things being equal, a larger sensor brings undeniable advantages; greater dynamic range, lower noise and more control over depth of field. Those are the reasons I wanted a DSLR, and the K-x has any M4/3 camera beat in those parameters. The K-x will bring two stops of ISO, a couple/three stops of DR and an extra stop in DOF. These are highly significant advantages. The only thing that M4/3 wins on is size, if you pick one of the small ones.

I don't think anyone recommended a book to you. The almost universal recommendation is Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson. It's non-technical and very readable.
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