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05-22-2010, 10:16 PM   #16
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Man - I don't know about the Kelby books. I can't speak for vols 2 & 3 but I received "Book 1" some years ago as a gift from a relative who mindlessly grabbed any photography book off the shelf.

I can't believe someone is making $$ off a book so light in the britches. It should have been printed as a board book. Check to see if your local library has a copy.

There is an entire page dedicated to buying flowers at a florist for photography -- one small paragraph accompanied by a large photo (iStockphoto no less) of flowers in buckets. The whole book is like this.

05-23-2010, 01:20 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by MrPetkus Quote
"Digital Exposure Handbook" by Ross Hoddinott. This is my favorite field book on exposure. Clearly written from layman to technical. Small, carry-about size.
This book reads like the fine print on a contract - it's way too small.
05-23-2010, 06:50 AM   #18
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Digital Exposure Handbook

QuoteOriginally posted by JHD Quote
This book reads like the fine print on a contract - it's way too small.
Good point regarding size. Here are a couple of snaps using a quarter for scale.

Personally I appreciate the small size and durable construction.

Last edited by MrPetkus; 04-17-2012 at 08:49 PM.
05-23-2010, 07:33 AM   #19
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Good Books

I have almost all of Peterson's books and go back to them over and over. The exposure book seemed to work for my style of learning. I also tend to pull out the books if it has been a while since I used my camera and before a big event. They help to remind me of ideas and concepts.

06-02-2010, 01:05 PM   #20
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Understanding Photography

I recently purchased Bryan Peterson's Understanding Photography Field Guide and I love it. Tons of great info in a book small enough (but not too small) to throw in a bag and take with you. I agree about the Kelby books. I bought volume one and although it has some decent info, it wasn't worth the price paid for it.
06-02-2010, 01:20 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by Class A Quote
Thanks for the link!

I don't endorse his views about f/22 not hurting sharpness (it provably does) but these shots were great.
Sometimes it depends on the lens on how good it can handle high apertures. Below are 2 shots taken at f22 with DA 15mm. No editing done. Just re-sized.




Last edited by Alex00; 06-02-2010 at 07:14 PM.
06-02-2010, 04:05 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by Alex00 Quote
Sometimes it depends on the lens on how good it can handle large apertures.
The (large) f-ratio f/22 refers to a small aperture.

Diffraction effects are not lens-dependent. Diffraction only depends on the f-ratio and there is no way to avoid the loss in resolution for small apertures. Pixel peepers will already start to observe a loss of sharpness for the K-7 at f/11.
06-02-2010, 06:58 PM   #23
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There is no running away from diffraction, and it will effect sharpness slightly and not by much. It is also lens dependent. Not all lenses behave the same at f22.
Pixel peeping is not always the goal. You basically have 2 options, either user f22 to get everything in focus, or move to a lower f stop and get only part of the photo in focus. If it is important for you to get everything in focus from near distance to infinity, then you have no choice but to use f22. You can also use hyperfocal distance if your lens allows it, but you will be limited to how close you can focus. The 2 photos i posted clearly shows how f22 looks like. Although i don't shoot beyond f11, sometimes i do find myself needing to go higher and use f22. Photos shot at f22 will work just fine and will also look good on large prints.


Last edited by Alex00; 06-02-2010 at 07:37 PM.
06-02-2010, 10:29 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Alex00 Quote
There is no running away from diffraction, and it will effect sharpness slightly and not by much. It is also lens dependent. Not all lenses behave the same at f22.
There is ~2MP resolution in a f/22 image. While it is true that not all lenses behave exactly the same at f/22, I venture to say that the differences will be marginal and the (relatively poor) upper bound on resolution is the same for all.

In order to get extensive DOF and critical sharpness, there is no way around view cameras or tilt/shift lenses which allow you to tilt the focus plane.
06-02-2010, 11:50 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by Class A Quote
There is ~2MP resolution in a f/22 image. While it is true that not all lenses behave exactly the same at f/22, I venture to say that the differences will be marginal and the (relatively poor) upper bound on resolution is the same for all.

In order to get extensive DOF and critical sharpness, there is no way around view cameras or tilt/shift lenses which allow you to tilt the focus plane.
I don't disagree with you, but I honestly believe f22 does a great job getting everything is focus, not necessary on the pixel peeping side but getting everything is acceptable focus. You have to sacrifice one thing for the other. Either PP or acceptable sharpness thru out the frame. Here's a 100% crop of the above sunflower shot. at f22 it looks pretty good. Although i don't use f22 much, for those special occasions when you do, results are acceptable.

06-13-2010, 12:36 AM   #26
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I just picked up Understanding Exposure and I love the way he explains things, it really clicks with me, especially considering I'm new to SLR photography. I'm finding it a bit difficult to put the theory into practice all the time, but the more I do it the better I get, fancy that!
09-02-2010, 05:28 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by miltllama Quote
I just picked up Understanding Exposure and I love the way he explains things, it really clicks with me, especially considering I'm new to SLR photography. I'm finding it a bit difficult to put the theory into practice all the time, but the more I do it the better I get, fancy that!
Great to hear! There's another great book you should pick up. You can find a link in my signature.
09-08-2010, 12:43 AM   #28
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I really enjoyed reading the photographers eye, by michael freeman. He explains everything so well and gave me lots of good hints. I'll have see if I can hunt down the understanding exposure book.
09-08-2010, 04:09 AM   #29
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Brian Peterson does explain things in basic, first-principles language, and is very practical.
The diffraction problem of small apertures is real, but is no cause to avoid shooting smaller than f/11. I have seen little appreciable softness in my f/16-22 images. I've even done macros at f/32 and find them to be very sharp throughout the frame at 100% - one pass of sharpening, and it's tack sharp.
09-08-2010, 08:34 PM   #30
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I highly recommend learning the Zone System once you get to understand basic exposure methods.

The gold standard on this system is Ansel Adams' "The Negative," and while much of the book lends itself to tray-processing sheet film, the basics are applicable to digital photography.

There is a ton of into on the net about the Zone System as well, without needing to purchase the book.
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