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05-14-2010, 03:34 PM   #1
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lens for interior shots

Hi, Can someone suggest a good lens to take interior / architectural shots?
possibly a k mount

Regards
Mario


Last edited by pako80; 05-14-2010 at 03:41 PM.
05-14-2010, 04:11 PM   #2
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You quite probably need a wide angle lens and you are very lucky, that there is a wide variety of wide angle lenses available.

First you need to decide HOW wide. If you need a super-wide lens, something like the Sigma 10-20mm would be my personally prefered choice. Not quite as wide, but a high quality zoom would be the Pentax 12-24mm. Alternatively there are a couple of prime lenses, like the DA 15mm or the DA 14mm - both of which are good lenses, but won't go as wide as the current zooms. One of my personal favourites in the wide angle department is the old Pentax 15/3.5 K-mount lens. But it is big and bulky and still not really less expensive, than a modern AF lens.

For interriors and architecture I would by any means not use a fish-eye lens, because the fish-eye distortion is a nice effect, but wears off and usually is quite unacceptable for this kind of images.

Ben
05-14-2010, 04:19 PM   #3
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Thanks very helpful reply!
05-14-2010, 04:26 PM   #4
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I concur with the Sigma 10-20mm UWA Lens as being a good sharp lens.

05-14-2010, 05:24 PM   #5
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I'd never recommend a Stigma lens to anyone, but the DA12-24 has served me very well indeed, and the 10-17 fisheye can be very good, though as Ben says, the effect wears off very quickly, there are numerous software packages that can be used to de-fish the images, which makes the lens a lot more useful than it would appear to be at first glance.
05-14-2010, 06:57 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by pako80 Quote
Hi, Can someone suggest a good lens to take interior / architectural shots?
possibly a k mount

Regards
Mario
I just got the Tamron 10-24 . I am very impress in using it inside. Take the full width of a room
05-14-2010, 08:07 PM   #7
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I don't think I'd disagree with any of the suggestions here. I will say that the optics of the DA 12-24 are really good for interior shots. It is an f4 lens though.

I've recently read several comments from DA 14 users that this lens is overlooked and as an f2.8 lens it provides some help in lower light situations.
05-14-2010, 08:55 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by pako80 Quote
Hi, Can someone suggest a good lens to take interior / architectural shots?
possibly a k mount

Regards
Mario
I've had the DA12-24, I currently have the Sigma 10-20 f/4, and I wouldn't use either of them indoors for architecture shots, they're just too slow. I've also had the DA14mm, and I LOVED it indoors. (It's the only lens I've ever regretted selling & plan on reacquiring asap) Sharp, sharp, sharp, perfect color, and at f/2.8 I never needed the flash indoors.

For interior, wide angle, flash-less photography, the DA14 is the lens best suited and will not disappoint

05-14-2010, 09:21 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ecaterin Quote
I've had the DA12-24, I currently have the Sigma 10-20 f/4, and I wouldn't use either of them indoors for architecture shots, they're just too slow.
I tend to forget about photography during earthquakes.
You are braver than I am.
I had the 14/2.8 and quite liked it, except for it's size.
I thought that for what it was, it was too big.

The 12-24 gives up a stop but gains in versatility with little or no loss of image quality over the 14.
Both are big lenses, the 12-24 is somewhat bigger than the 14.

I'm not seeing how a stop of speed is that big of a deal for a subject that is about as static as they come, though I would be interested in you expanding on this.
05-14-2010, 09:26 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wheatfield Quote
I tend to forget about photography during earthquakes.
You are braver than I am.
I had the 14/2.8 and quite liked it, except for it's size.
I thought that for what it was, it was too big.

The 12-24 gives up a stop but gains in versatility with little or no loss of image quality over the 14.
Both are big lenses, the 12-24 is somewhat bigger than the 14.

I'm not seeing how a stop of speed is that big of a deal for a subject that is about as static as they come, though I would be interested in you expanding on this.
*roflsnort* Just my personal preference. I hand hold everything and I found that extra stop on the DA14 made a huge difference to my ability to get a clean shot
05-15-2010, 03:48 AM   #11
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In my view you have received some good input, however - I would ask what your intentions (uses) are for the images? Is this for some Real Estate business or just personal? The reason why I ask is how the images may be used, thus might help in terms of how they should be taken, therefore have a bearing on the type of lens. Let me explain....

If this is for a real estate business, taking pictures of house interiors, here in the US HDR is used quite frequently - almost exclusively I have read. I think that there was a thread here on this, here on the forum. The reason is lighting - not really having to consider over exposed windows and the like. If this is the case, then a tripod will in all likelihood be needed, which would enable you to go with a slower lens (the zoom wide angles from Sigma, Tamron or Pentax). If hand held, depending on the lighting - the prime 14/2.8 would be good. On the other hand, if going with the zoom, using something as wide as possible, the 10-20mm might be a bit too wide, with the distortion at the edges. The distortion with the Pentax 12-24, is much better controlled, by giving up the additional 2mm.

Another consideration is use - static or dynamic? Static - is just the image showing the room, viewed either as just an image on the web or a brochure. Dynamic - would be a website, with the user or viewer observing interactively. In this case, rather than taking the images from the room corners, you might consider taking the images with a fisheye from the room's center, and stitching into a 360, thus enabling the user to pan and zoom on a web site.
Virtual Tour of The Gamble House, by Greene & Greene | Pasadena, California
... so just a few considerations to take into account.


Last edited by interested_observer; 05-15-2010 at 03:56 AM.
05-15-2010, 05:46 AM   #12
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Thanks for all your replies, im a beginner, i just need to take some shots of my house to submit them to a magazine, will search on ebay for a pentax 14mm, i have a tripod so i won't take any hand hel shots, the 14mm from pentax is quite expensive though
05-15-2010, 07:29 AM   #13
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I could recommend the SMC Pentax-A 15mm F3.5 which is a rectilinear lens i.e. which still maintains relatively straight lines at the edges, which I find ideal this type of work.

It may not be the fastest kid on the block, but at F3.5 still quick enough to be hand held, but I always tripod mount for this work anyway.

Just bear in mind it is very wide on FF cameras but not so much on today’s DSLR’s. Check out the reviews on the lens section of this site.
05-15-2010, 07:36 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by pako80 Quote
Thanks for all your replies, im a beginner, i just need to take some shots of my house to submit them to a magazine, will search on ebay for a pentax 14mm, i have a tripod so i won't take any hand hel shots, the 14mm from pentax is quite expensive though
You should not overestimate the value of a fast aperture for interiors. Usually you would want to get a more extended depth of field, to have more of the room in focus. For these general wide shots, you will step down the lens considerably, if it is not a spacious ballroom - and thus you will have no benefit at all from the faster lens.

If you want to pick out details of the architecture, which should stand out sharply against a blurred background, you mostly would not use that wide angle lens anyway, but something longer.

Ben
05-16-2010, 10:44 AM   #15
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I agree with Ben. Sure in certain very situations where you specifically want a shallow DOF, f/2.8 might be useful in a an ultra-wide. But given that you don't need particularly high shutter speeds to handhold at these focal lengths, f/4 is already quite usable in low light, and even then you'd rarely shoot that wide open except for casual candids. If you're shooting interiors for a magazine, you'd stop down and use a tripod. f/2.8 wouldn't be needed or even desired for the vast majority of interior shots, and certainly should not be considered for the application you are discussing.

So between the fact that the 14 is a prime and therefore not as flexible as the zooms, and the fact that it's not particularly good with distortion and is not otherwise optically better than the other choices suggested, and is also among the most expensive choices at this focal length, it would be very very low on the list of options I'd be considering, well below the Sigma zooms, the DA12-24, or even the DA15 (which at least has the advantage of being a really fun small lens).

Last edited by Marc Sabatella; 05-19-2010 at 07:55 PM.
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