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08-20-2010, 09:24 AM   #1
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Timed exposure during the daytime?

During my research for a DSLR to buy, 2-3 weeks ago, i found an article that had some photos that looked like normal snapshots of a street with some cars parked on the curb.

But underneath the photo was an explaination. It was a timed exposure, cant remember how long, but it said the street was busy, with people walking around and cars constantly. According to the article the guy set up a tripod, mounted the glass from a welders helmet to the front of the lens, and took a timed exposure. The welding helmet glass was so dark that anything moving would not show up on the picture, but anything that was stationary would.

Any truth to this? Being how dark a welders helmet is would assume the exposure was VERY long. Unfortunately i cannot find the article as i did not bookmark it and its long gone out of my history. This would be a very interesting thing to do with photos.

08-20-2010, 09:26 AM   #2
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Clearing the streets with ND's, interesting! I have to try this some time.
08-20-2010, 09:54 AM   #3
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Would really like to see that article...sounds very interesting
08-20-2010, 10:14 AM   #4
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Heres a link.
Quickie: Use a Welding Glass As A 14 Stops ND Filter | DIYPhotography.net

08-20-2010, 10:21 AM   #5
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Well, thats the technique but not the article.
I'm pretty sure it was on Photographyblog, i'm gonna have to do more research

The thing was, the article was not about this specific thing, it was about something completely different, the timed exposure with the welding glass was just an example of something, which makes it hard to find again.
08-20-2010, 12:09 PM   #6
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I remember reading up on ND filters somewhere and the author said that a trick of architecture photographers was to slap on an ND with a larger stop reduction (like, -3 stops or more. ish.) and to do a long exposure, which would render the masses of tourists so blurry that they were invisible. He included an example picture where a .5 second of a tourist walking down a halfway produced a strong blur, whereas a 4 second exposure of the same hallway produced...just the hallway.
08-21-2010, 07:24 AM   #7
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So you want us to find the actual article you were reading, not explain how to do it? There are hundreds of how tos on this technique.
08-21-2010, 08:01 AM   #8
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There's some commercial products out there also. Lee makes a 10 stop filter that it sells. I'm sure there are others also.

Lee Filters USA | The BIG Stopper

08-21-2010, 11:25 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by frooggy Quote
So you want us to find the actual article you were reading, not explain how to do it? There are hundreds of how tos on this technique.

Well, i just wanted some basic information, i had only seen the article once and in passing, so i wasn't sure if this technique was even real, or if i had remembered it correctly. Thank you for the Sarcasm


Do they make 52mm 10stop ND filters? or do they only come in sheets you have to mount onto your camera, i notice that one above is 100mm x 100mm
08-21-2010, 12:13 PM   #10
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The inexpensive way: get some crappy filters, cheap on the bay. Use a lens tool to unscrew the filter rings and remove the crappy filter glass. Go to a large hardware store and buy welder's glass, typically (in USA) 4x5 inches for well under US$10. Take the welder's glass to a window-glass shop and have circular cut-outs made, to fit your filter rings. Assemble and wail!! Single hi-ND filters are usually expensive, especially in larger diameters.
08-21-2010, 03:03 PM   #11
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QuoteQuote:
which would render the masses of tourists so blurry that they were invisible.
Not quite. It has nothing to do with blurr. It has to do with exposure.
08-21-2010, 03:19 PM   #12
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And if you get some welding glass made by Jackson, get ready for major green images.
At least that is what I remember ending up with, has been a while thou.

Cheers, Mike.
08-21-2010, 08:51 PM   #13
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I played around with something similar. I didn't use a ND filter, but it was dark, so I had a 30 sec exposure. I put the camera on a tripod, tripped the shutter, waited a couple of seconds, got one of the kids to walk into the frame and stand there for about 10 seconds, then leave. There were no trails of them walking into the frame, and when they left, it made them look transparent. It was fun to play with. Something everyone should try one evening.
08-21-2010, 09:01 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by jaieger Quote
I remember reading up on ND filters somewhere and the author said that a trick of architecture photographers was to slap on an ND with a larger stop reduction (like, -3 stops or more. ish.) and to do a long exposure, which would render the masses of tourists so blurry that they were invisible. He included an example picture where a .5 second of a tourist walking down a halfway produced a strong blur, whereas a 4 second exposure of the same hallway produced...just the hallway.
You can use this phenomenon to play around altering the lighting (or even the objects) in a scene.

For example:





Pentax K20D
Tamron 17-50/2.8





Pentax K20D
Cosina MF 20/3.8


The first photo is a 15 minute exposure, during which I walked up to the lantern and removed a flash unit and also crossed the bridge twice in order to hang out over the edge with a flash on a monopod, illuminating the bridge by firing the flash a total of twenty times. It is sort of fun moving around in the scene of your photograph during the exposure, knowing you won't show up in it.

The second is a 13 second exposure. I used the self-timer to get myself into the frame, illuminated myself with an LED flashlight, jumped out of the frame, and illuminated the binocular stand with the flashlight.
08-22-2010, 10:36 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by Silverkarn Quote
Any truth to this? Being how dark a welders helmet is would assume the exposure was VERY long. Unfortunately i cannot find the article as i did not bookmark it and its long gone out of my history. This would be a very interesting thing to do with photos.
You asked if there was any truth. I tried to help and gave a link.

QuoteOriginally posted by Silverkarn Quote
Well, thats the technique but not the article.


Well, i just wanted some basic information, i had only seen the article once and in passing, so i wasn't sure if this technique was even real, or if i had remembered it correctly. Thank you for the Sarcasm
The link I posted was basic information and proved it was real. Your repy was as such you were upset I didn't point to the article you had happened to read. Sorry.
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