Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
09-22-2010, 05:05 PM   #16
Inactive Account




Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,972
Go to any photo store (Blacks, Henry, etc.) and ask for a translucent film canister - they likely have 100's sitting around. Buy a $1 xacto knife and cut out a slat in the canister so that it will fit over your on-board flash.

You now have a $30 diffuser for about $1.

c[_]

Here's a "how to" link:
http://content.photojojo.com/diy/diy-film-container-flash-diffuser/

09-22-2010, 05:08 PM   #17
Site Supporter
jpzk's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Québec
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 6,969
I have oone of those Gary Fong pop-up-flash diffuser right here! I live in Quebec.
If your photoshoot is NEXT Wednesday, maybe I can arrange to ship it to you quickly (as long as you return it :ugh: ). Email me if you want it.
Or else, you can always give a go at some suggestions offered earlier here by other members.
Cheers.

JP
09-22-2010, 05:14 PM   #18
Pentaxian
eccs19's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Lisle, Ontario
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,458
QuoteOriginally posted by twilight_samurai Quote
That's going to be a lot of pictures taken with flash.. I know you won't be doing all 350 in a day but make sure you have lots of spare batteries!!
And storage space / memory cards.
09-22-2010, 06:27 PM   #19
Pentaxian




Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Oklahoma USA
Posts: 1,474
Do you have access to the location for the photos, under the same lighting conditions (time of day)? If so you can just experiment and find something that works. You might not end up using the flash. Any kind of slightly long lens should produce pleasing results, such as the 18-55mm at 50mm or so.

Paul

09-22-2010, 06:31 PM   #20
Veteran Member
miss_alexx's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Montréal, Québec
Photos: Albums
Posts: 584
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by jpzk Quote
I have oone of those Gary Fong pop-up-flash diffuser right here!

JP
Is it worth it?

QuoteOriginally posted by eccs19 Quote
And storage space / memory cards.
Of course!
09-22-2010, 06:33 PM   #21
Veteran Member
miss_alexx's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Montréal, Québec
Photos: Albums
Posts: 584
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by tibbitts Quote
Do you have access to the location for the photos, under the same lighting conditions (time of day)? If so you can just experiment and find something that works. You might not end up using the flash. Any kind of slightly long lens should produce pleasing results, such as the 18-55mm at 50mm or so.

Paul
The lighting conditions may not be the same each time since photos will be taken in different classroom (sometimes with windows, sometimes not).
09-22-2010, 11:46 PM   #22
Veteran Member
tomtor's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 382
QuoteOriginally posted by jon.partsch Quote
First of all, congratulations on your first paid gig!! That's huge!

Take my advice with a grain of salt, because I am an amateur, but I would ABSOLUTELY NOT use the pop-up flash (at least not without combining it with an off-camera strobe). Not knowing how much you are getting paid for this, I would advise you to spend the amount you would make in obtaining a cheap shoe mound strobe, shoot-through umbrella
(or reflector) and a trigger (cheap optical or radio - like the Cactus radio trigger). You can probably break even and end up expanding your toolkit. Solo direct on-camera flash almost always looks terrible. Read the strobist blog (Strobist) to get some basic ideas about how to work with off-camera, shoe-mount stobes in manual mode.

I say that solo pop-up flash almost always looks terrible - at least indoors. If you are able to do the shoot outdoors and use the pop-up flash to add some subtle front-fill light (in neg. flash compensation mode) to detract from any harsh shadows created by the sun (or even better - do it on a cloudy day), that might also work out for you.

I hope some other forum members can also provide some advice....

Cheers!
I 100% agree with these suggestions. It's important to realize that you don't need to spend a lot of money for portrait lightning. I have two expensive flashes for events, but I normally use old second hand manual mode 10$ flashes, Chinese radio trigger and umbrellas for portraits. You can get such a set for about 40$. The most expensive would be a light stand. I'd borrow you a set if you lived closer. It does not only give great lightning, you look more professional as well :-)

When you cannot get a cheap second hand flash or borrow one, than use one of the diffuser suggestions.

Can't you place your subjects near a window and avoid the use of flash?
Or use a strong lamp. In all cases you can use a white board on the opposite of the light source to reflect light on the subject to fill the shadows.

I'm sure you'll do fine, but practise on your family with the various lightning options before the shoot!
09-23-2010, 12:17 AM   #23
New Member




Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Australia
Posts: 5
Why don't you place a little tape (sticky, durex) over the flash and see how that goes.
Also could try out a little tissue paper on the flash, might soften it just enough without losing the light.

Just a suggestion, you would have to try it out before hand to see what might work for you

09-23-2010, 12:19 AM   #24
Pentaxian
Steinback's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: GTA, ON, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,672
Translucent film canister (I like Fuji) cut to fit over the the onboard flash is a good suggestion to diffuse the flash for short range portraits. I have one in each of my camera bags for the rare occasions when I don't feel like carrying around a proper off camera flash. Try it ahead of time to see the difference in light quality and watch out for shadows from the lens hood.
09-23-2010, 12:23 AM   #25
Senior Member
jon.partsch's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Northern California
Posts: 142
QuoteOriginally posted by ll_coffee_lP Quote
Go to any photo store (Blacks, Henry, etc.) and ask for a translucent film canister - they likely have 100's sitting around. Buy a $1 xacto knife and cut out a slat in the canister so that it will fit over your on-board flash.

You now have a $30 diffuser for about $1.

c[_]

Here's a "how to" link:
Reduce, Reuse, Diffuse: Make Your Own Flash Diffuser from an Old Film Container | Photojojo
This is even better than my suggestion!! In all honesty though, I really do not believe that these kind of diffusers make a whole lot of difference.

QuoteOriginally posted by tomtor Quote
I 100% agree with these suggestions. It's important to realize that you don't need to spend a lot of money for portrait lightning. I have two expensive flashes for events, but I normally use old second hand manual mode 10$ flashes, Chinese radio trigger and umbrellas for portraits. You can get such a set for about 40$. The most expensive would be a light stand. I'd borrow you a set if you lived closer. It does not only give great lightning, you look more professional as well :-)

When you cannot get a cheap second hand flash or borrow one, than use one of the diffuser suggestions.

Can't you place your subjects near a window and avoid the use of flash?
Or use a strong lamp. In all cases you can use a white board on the opposite of the light source to reflect light on the subject to fill the shadows.

I'm sure you'll do fine, but practise on your family with the various lightning options before the shoot!
Well, the OP is a student and is short on time, and probably on money - though I still stand by my suggestions about off-camera strobe (really, scrounging up $150 for a kit like this is an excellent investment), I think some window light or some bright lamp light reflected by a dry-erase whiteboard or just a large sheet of white butcher's paper could go a long way to help create softer illumination in the portraits. I really advise you find some way to introduce off-axis light to the scene - but by all means, experiment with the pop-up flash and diffuser before your first session, because if you can get satisfactory results with it, it is much simpler.

Good luck! I am glad to see some smart advice coming from the Forum. I think we are all pretty excited for you - you're a pro now!
09-23-2010, 08:51 AM   #26
Moderator PEG Judges
Kerrowdown's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Highlands of Scotland.
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 30,584
Congrats on a paid shoot, is outside shooting a possibility, saves on flash kit, just use a reflector or two.
09-23-2010, 09:53 AM   #27
New Member




Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Alberta
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 10
Flash set up

Take a look on Kijiji-Montreal and see this:
CTR-301P Wireless Flash Trigger + Receiver set with PC Sync

CTR-301P Wireless Flash Trigger + Receiver set with PC Sync - Montréal Cameras For Sale - Kijiji Montréal Canada.

This is only the trigger unit but you can also search for "Flash" and find a used Flash unit for cheap. I only took a quick look and I found a few items that should allow you to set up a better lighting environment for under $100


Try this Search as well - Vivitar 2800 for $30 bucks!


This is an exciting time for you - Good luck next week!

Last edited by R. Wethereyet; 09-23-2010 at 10:38 AM. Reason: Added Link
09-23-2010, 11:45 AM   #28
Pentaxian
Steinback's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: GTA, ON, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,672
@ R. Wethereyet - As you mentioned the Vivitar 2800 flash specifically, I'd like to point out that their flash sync voltage is higher than what is generally considered safe for Pentax digital bodies. I have one left over from my K1000 and it syncs at 36 volts, compared to the ~24 volts that is generally considered to be safe for Pentax DSLRs. The range of safe sync voltages is poorly defined because Pentax hasn't come out to given an official maximum safe value, however most modern flashes operate in the 3 to 6 volt range.

I retired mine to use with film bodies only in favour of a set of 6 volt sync Vivitar 285s for my K10d.

There is a later Vivitar 2800-D (dedicated) that has a low sync voltage, however I believe it lacks the auto sensor modes and most of the manual flash levels that make the regular 2800 attractive as a beginner flash.
09-23-2010, 01:04 PM   #29
Pentaxian
aleonx3's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Brampton, Ontario
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,873
QuoteOriginally posted by miss_alexx Quote
Hi, I have been hired to take photos of every student of my school department. This is the first time I will shoot portraits of this kind. They want very simple photos with a blank white background. I need some advices about this.

I don't own an external flash so I will use my k-x popup flash. I'm thinking about using the DAL 18-55 because the shooting space is small (I have about 8 feet in front of the white background) . What do you think about this setup? What aperture value should I choose?

Thanks for helping me.
Congratulation on getting this paid assignment. I agree with most posters here that using the popup flash could be a challenge, especially against a while background. You will need to deal with the harsh (or soft) shadow cast on the white background. External flash gives you flexibility of using bounce flash (but not all external flash have the swivel). You also need to know how far the person stands/sits in front of the white background. If you can avoid using flash, then make sure you have good lighting - use reflector (something so that you can deflect some light from the window etc) if you can.

As for the lens to use, I think the M50 1.7 or 2.0 would be good, depending on how far you are from the subject. If you are tight on space, M2.8 would be good.

Hope it helps..
09-23-2010, 01:05 PM   #30
New Member




Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Alberta
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 10
Steinback - Good points and things for Miss Alexx to consider - Thanks!
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
background, camera, flash, pentax help, photography, photos
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
People First Paid Studio Work 68wSteve Post Your Photos! 7 03-29-2010 08:53 AM
First Paid Photoshoot...Packagae Pricing??? Sound Reasonable? 68wSteve Photographic Industry and Professionals 10 03-22-2010 04:12 PM
My first paid cover! rfortson Photographic Industry and Professionals 24 04-15-2009 05:28 PM
A paid shoot mel Photographic Technique 17 07-25-2008 09:42 AM
First Paid Shoot.... Scott Rylance Post Your Photos! 8 08-11-2007 06:13 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:34 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top