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10-12-2010, 03:50 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by goddo31 Quote



I'm not sure how an ND filter is meant to help, as from my understanding it would just take light from the whole scene. Forcing lower shutter speed or higher ISO etc.

cheers
He probably meant a graduated ND filter, such that you could hopefully expose for the sky and the skier at the same time.

Those are tough shooting conditions. I would probably dial in .7 to 1 positive EV compensation to try to compensate. You'll end up blowing out the sky, but you'll also reveal more details in the water and the skier. You could also just bring up shadows in post processing.

The other posters are right. Look for good light first. If the light is no good, you will have to do your best and the end results still may not be the greatest...

10-12-2010, 05:20 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by goddo31 Quote
I am no expert but I have a couple of things to add...



I agree, the position of you and your subject relative to the sun is the most important factor. You can reduce the harshness of this effect in PP. With practice it can be kept looking natural too.
However without doing much PP, here are some examples of what the difference can be when the position to the sun changes. Apologies for the wonky horizons...



cheers
Thanks for a good example, I will try play more with the position. In my case it is easier to move the subject (me) than the camera position, because I was using an intelligent remote camera control - my wife :-)

What kind of lens you are using? I saw some of your shots were done with 400mm.
10-12-2010, 06:00 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by vladm11 Quote
Thanks for a good example, I will try play more with the position. In my case it is easier to move the subject (me) than the camera position, because I was using an intelligent remote camera control - my wife :-)
Or you can move to the other side of the ocean, so the sun will not be on the wrong side anymore... ;-)
10-12-2010, 01:52 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by goddo31 Quote
...the position of you and your subject relative to the sun is the most important factor...

Change the angle to the sun and see how the subject is lit up differently:

...In no way is camera X guaranteed to give you better results than camera Y, how you use it is more important.
And that is the conclusion of the whole matter...

Various factors come into play when making/taking photographs. In order of importance, they are:

1) the photographer
2) the subject
3) the light
4) the lens
5) the camera

A camera is a box upon which you hang lenses. Everything else is more critical.


The above insight was posted by someone here a while back. It is very useful those for who want to move beyond 'point and shoot picture taking' into 'photography' with a DSLR. The learning curve in this hobby is quite demanding but the results are well worth it.

10-12-2010, 05:54 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
He probably meant a graduated ND filter, such that you could hopefully expose for the sky and the skier at the same time.

Those are tough shooting conditions. I would probably dial in .7 to 1 positive EV compensation to try to compensate. You'll end up blowing out the sky, but you'll also reveal more details in the water and the skier. You could also just bring up shadows in post processing.

The other posters are right. Look for good light first. If the light is no good, you will have to do your best and the end results still may not be the greatest...
Interesting point about the graduated ND filter. Personally I would think that it would be too much hassle for a moving subject. But that's just IMO.

QuoteOriginally posted by vladm11 Quote
Thanks for a good example, I will try play more with the position. In my case it is easier to move the subject (me) than the camera position, because I was using an intelligent remote camera control - my wife :-)

What kind of lens you are using? I saw some of your shots were done with 400mm.
No worries.
If your wife is going to stay in one spot, I agree it would be a good idea to try moving your position relative to her and the sun. See what happens

I was using the old M series 400mm lens listed in my signature. More reach than the 55-300, but manual focus and exposure. Saying that, it's still quite straight forward to use. The 55-300 is a more than capable lens though. I might suggest asking your wife to try going out to the full 300mm length and shooting around f/8. JHD has a fair point too.

good luck!
cheers
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