Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
11-15-2010, 10:42 AM   #1
New Member




Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 7
travel tips for Argentina

Hi Forum,

I'm leaving for Argentina in a few days with my new K-x and I have a few questions.

I'm going to be down in Patagonia and I'm wondering if anyone has any specific tips for shooting ice, as in glaciers.

I'm also going to be in Iguazu and I'm wondering if anyone has any specific tips for shooting gigantic waterfalls.

I have the 18-55 and 50-300 kit lenses.

I'm thinking I'm going stick with the 18-55 for general walking around, but was planning on using the 50-300 for trekking outdoors in Patagonia - to catch wildlife and such. For the falls, I'm not sure what to use.

Any help or guidance is appreciated. THANKS!

11-15-2010, 11:37 AM   #2
Veteran Member




Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 360
QuoteOriginally posted by freshsnapper Quote
Hi Forum,

I'm leaving for Argentina in a few days with my new K-x and I have a few questions.

I'm going to be down in Patagonia and I'm wondering if anyone has any specific tips for shooting ice, as in glaciers.

I'm also going to be in Iguazu and I'm wondering if anyone has any specific tips for shooting gigantic waterfalls.

I have the 18-55 and 50-300 kit lenses.

I'm thinking I'm going stick with the 18-55 for general walking around, but was planning on using the 50-300 for trekking outdoors in Patagonia - to catch wildlife and such. For the falls, I'm not sure what to use.

Any help or guidance is appreciated. THANKS!

If I have to take a guess, the 18-55 will do it for the fall... @ 18 it should be wide enough (there's not alot of lens that go wider than that), and since you'll probably be doing daylight shooting, f/3.5 should be enough (i think), you might wanna check on that, I've never had any real experience with SLR and lens but I've done alot of readings in the past few days, and that's what I would think in your situation.

and i found this little gem on google
http://www.apshots.com/f-stops/?tag=waterfall

Last edited by clockwork247; 11-15-2010 at 11:42 AM.
11-15-2010, 12:54 PM   #3
Site Supporter
SpecialK's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: So California
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 14,440
If you are shooting white things such as ice and waterfalls that fill up a significant portion of the image, you will want to overexpose about 1/2 to 1 stop so you do not get "gray ice".
11-15-2010, 07:01 PM   #4
Veteran Member
DaveHolmes's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Yorkshire
Posts: 1,501
Auto-Bracket... At least until you work out whats working...

11-15-2010, 07:06 PM   #5
Veteran Member
DaveHolmes's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Yorkshire
Posts: 1,501
Oh.... And for the waterfall... Tripod... If you want to 'freeze' the motion of the water then you may get away handheld but for a 'flowy' effect you're going to need a tripod for longer exposures...

Do a search for waterfall pictures and see what you like...

If space and weight is an issue you could try a Gorrilapod and a 2/12 second delay on shutter release...

Last edited by DaveHolmes; 11-15-2010 at 07:08 PM. Reason: missed something...
11-15-2010, 07:27 PM   #6
Inactive Account




Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Indiana
Posts: 101
I'll second the Gorillapod suggestion. You might find opportunities to take shots at dusk or under moonglow that can add a lot to your travelogue of your visit. Have fun and post pics when you return!
11-15-2010, 10:55 PM   #7
Veteran Member




Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 360
QuoteOriginally posted by DaveHolmes Quote
Oh.... And for the waterfall... Tripod... If you want to 'freeze' the motion of the water then you may get away handheld but for a 'flowy' effect you're going to need a tripod for longer exposures...

Do a search for waterfall pictures and see what you like...

If space and weight is an issue you could try a Gorrilapod and a 2/12 second delay on shutter release...
is there any technique to holding the camera really still? like how the police hold a gun? you think it'll work? lol. Just how long are we talking about? 1-2s or 8-10s?
11-16-2010, 09:10 AM   #8
Veteran Member




Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Taiwan
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,073
I think a polarizer filter would be needed if you are taking a lot of photos of waterfalls and ice. And possibly an ND4 or ND8 filter (along with a tripod) for a long waterfall exposure.

Have fun in Argentina. I wanted to go a couple of years ago when I was in Peru but I was running out of money and I tore a ligament in my finger. I took that as a sign that I was supposed to go home.

11-16-2010, 10:32 AM   #9
Veteran Member
DaveHolmes's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Yorkshire
Posts: 1,501
QuoteOriginally posted by clockwork247 Quote
is there any technique to holding the camera really still? like how the police hold a gun? you think it'll work? lol. Just how long are we talking about? 1-2s or 8-10s?
Michael Vasquez talks of the 'ninja technique' ... Stand wide (karate style LOL)... Left hand on right shoulder blade so that left elbow becomes a platform by your chin for camera to rest on...

I've got a fairly steady hand but I'd say anything slower than a 15th of a second (Ninja or not) and I start to struggle (please read 'I deffo struggle')... Keeping a camera 'dead still' for a second doesn't happen for me without a tripod... Usually when using my tripod I tend to use the self timer function on the K-x to make sure my finger pressing the shutter button dosen't cause shakey-blurriness!

I honestly think that without some form of tripod in your kit... There's a piece of your camera missing...
11-17-2010, 07:46 AM   #10
New Member




Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 7
Original Poster
Thanks

Thanks for all the help everyone. Unfortunately, space will not allow for a tripod. I also think if I start setting up a tripod, my girlfriend might kill me. That's really a topic for a whole new discussion - how do you deal with spouses/girlfriends/boyfriends who want to keep moving and you want to spend 20 minutes futzing with your camera and getting the perfect shot?

But great tips all around - I'll try to post some shots when I get back.
11-17-2010, 11:35 AM   #11
Ira
Inactive Account




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Coral Springs, FL
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,218
Do you mean you have the 50-200? You said 50-300.

I don't think you'll want to mess with one either, but a cheap monopod always attached to the camera can be real helpful.

The problem is you have to play around with the extension to shoot from the angle you want, and it's just easier going handheld.

As far as girlfriends and spouses, the only way to really get detailed, intensive shooting is to leave them at home or hotel when possible. They get way too bored and start hating your guts.
11-17-2010, 11:38 AM   #12
New Member




Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 7
Original Poster
It's the 55-300, sorry.
11-17-2010, 11:40 AM   #13
Ira
Inactive Account




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Coral Springs, FL
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,218
QuoteOriginally posted by freshsnapper Quote
It's the 55-300, sorry.
Okay. MUCH better lens!
11-17-2010, 11:43 AM   #14
Ira
Inactive Account




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Coral Springs, FL
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,218
Note that I edited my above post.
11-17-2010, 11:44 AM   #15
Site Supporter
psychdoc's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Bham
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 942
QuoteOriginally posted by freshsnapper Quote
Thanks for all the help everyone. Unfortunately, space will not allow for a tripod. I also think if I start setting up a tripod, my girlfriend might kill me. That's really a topic for a whole new discussion - how do you deal with spouses/girlfriends/boyfriends who want to keep moving and you want to spend 20 minutes futzing with your camera and getting the perfect shot?

But great tips all around - I'll try to post some shots when I get back.
No tripod allowed: use a rock or the vehicle or some stationary object to place the camera and use the timer.
ND filter: a must if you want to get creative looking shots of the water flowing. If not at least get a polarizer.

There are many websites that can help you, see one example below:
How To Shoot Waterfalls - Tutorials
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
argentina, camera, patagonia, pentax help, photography, tips, travel tips
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Greetings from Argentina, Buenos Aires! mnjurio Welcomes and Introductions 3 11-15-2010 05:45 AM
SMALL and lightweight Travel tripod tips Nimrad Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 11 07-01-2010 08:47 PM
Landscape Dawn as seen from Cerro Chapelco, Argentina vikingo Photo Critique 2 06-01-2010 12:36 AM
Tips for international travel? paolojackson Travel, Events, and Groups 19 09-17-2009 10:46 PM
Hello from Argentina Seba Welcomes and Introductions 6 01-29-2009 11:56 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:31 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top