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12-23-2010, 09:42 AM   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by leadfoot Quote
It sounds like P mode on the mode selector dial might be a good place to start for you.

P mode is "automatic", the camera will select the aperture and shutter speed, and it sets them to maximize the sharpness of the lens mounted, the fastest shutter speed. The rear control wheel will change the aperture, and the camera will adjust the shutter speed appropriately.

If you've selected Auto ISO, P mode will start bumping up the ISO, but only as a last resort. Once the shutter speed gets to around 1/45 and the lens wide open, the camera will start bumping up the ISO as you turn the rear control wheel. This 1/45 of a second may be lens dependent, ie it might be 1/200 sec for a telephoto lens... Anyway, bumping up the ISO is the last thing P mode adjusts, just what you want. Try it and see!

Trust the K-x ISO performance - it really is quite excellent up to 1600/3200.

The P mode is highly automatic. After you get used to this and see what the camera does, move on to the other modes, like A mode to control the depth of field of focus, and T mode, to control shutter speed (like blurring a waterfall...)

I would also suggest using AF.S focus mode. This is very similar to point and shoots - push the shutter 1/2 way, and the camera will auto focus and lock the exposure/focus, and then a full push on the shutter takes the picture. In AF.S, the shutter will not fire until focus is locked. Try AF.S, center point only, or maybe the 5 point auto select. The 11 point and AF.C is more for moving objects like kids, birds, cars, etc. Your dog looked pretty immobile

BTW, shooting outside in snow, you need to over expose by 1-2 stops, otherwise the snow comes out gray, like in your shot. It's easy to dial in, regardless of what mode you are shooting - just push the +/-Av button and use the rear control wheel to dial in +1-2 stops.

Hope this, and the other posters suggestions, help.
I have never tried the P mode, on any camera. I have always tried with full manual except for MF. So at least I have some idea what I'm doing, but I will give the P mode a chance!

The over exposing you're talking about, here is my weak spot. For the most part, I have the +/- thingy at 0. I'm not completely sure it should always be at 0, sometimes I make it a bit darker to catch dramatic effects in the sky for example. So I believe I'm on the right path...

12-23-2010, 09:43 AM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by jolepp Quote
Low ISO = best results, of course, but the k-x with its much larger sensor (larger individual pixels) produces much better results than a P&S, I've been using 1600 and 3200 in regular indoor light and even the latter is pretty decent. Previously, with a Panasonic dmc-fz28 (a fancy P&S or bridge camera) ISO 400 was pretty much the limit :-)
QuoteOriginally posted by boriscleto Quote
Another thing about high ISO. You can select how much noise reduction is done in camera in menu C2:14 and what ISO it starts with in menu C3:15.

I'm starting to accepting the high ISO advantage of the K-x! And loving it!
I have also adjusted the settings for ISO, but thank you boriscleto!
12-23-2010, 01:21 PM   #33
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Exposure is easy to check. After taking a picture, and you are reviewing it on the screen, push the Info button - same thing if you're just playing back pictures.

After a push or two of the Info button, the camera will display the histogram of the image. For your dog picture in the snow, you'll see that the histogram is all bunched to the left (left = black, right = white). This is your clue to dial in some +exposure. It is better to be slightly underexposed and not blow out the highlights. Highlights, once blown, can't be recovered, where as it's usually easier to pull detail out of underexposed images, or dark areas of images like shadows, RAW images help alot here.

Much of this is explained in the manual (see page 29) - read it!

In general, high contrast scenes, think bright sunny, city streets, forest, gardens, etc, -exposure compensation helps. Snow, beach, etc, +exposure. You'll get a better feel for exposure as you gain experience.
12-24-2010, 12:25 AM   #34
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Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by leadfoot Quote
Exposure is easy to check. After taking a picture, and you are reviewing it on the screen, push the Info button - same thing if you're just playing back pictures.

After a push or two of the Info button, the camera will display the histogram of the image. For your dog picture in the snow, you'll see that the histogram is all bunched to the left (left = black, right = white). This is your clue to dial in some +exposure. It is better to be slightly underexposed and not blow out the highlights. Highlights, once blown, can't be recovered, where as it's usually easier to pull detail out of underexposed images, or dark areas of images like shadows, RAW images help alot here.

Much of this is explained in the manual (see page 29) - read it!

In general, high contrast scenes, think bright sunny, city streets, forest, gardens, etc, -exposure compensation helps. Snow, beach, etc, +exposure. You'll get a better feel for exposure as you gain experience.

Yes, I just have to keep trying and taking pictures.. I think the manual is pretty basic, just explains what everything is and a little about what things do/work.. But I'm getting there!

See if I get a chance to get out today in the daylight, the few minutes we have...

Thanks.

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