Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
12-28-2010, 03:09 PM   #1
New Member




Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NY
Posts: 21
Kit Lens Outdoor Action Shots

Can someone tell me a good setting for getting some outdoor pictures of children sledding with the K-X kit lens? Should I use the sport setting, or manually set ISO and Shutter Speed? Try to be as detailed as possible. After all, I am in the beginner's corner.

12-28-2010, 04:06 PM   #2
Veteran Member




Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 747
Though not too far from the beginner's corner myself, I find that I have to experiment a little. You might try the sport setting and see if that meets your needs. What I try to do for faster action is to go to shutter priority and set the speed to something sufficient, at least 1/500 shutter speed. If the sled is going fast, that may not be a fast enough shutter speed to freeze the action (assuming that is what you want to do), and may have to go to 1/1000. Assuming that is sufficient, I'll then set the iso speed high enough to allow the "floating" variable - aperture - to be great enough to have the speeding subject in focus in the final photo. If it is bright daylight in snow, you may be able to use the ISO at 200; as light availability is less, you will have to increase the ISO speed.


I hope this helps you a bit - please ask again if not. And rely on the wisdom of the other responders.

Glenn
12-28-2010, 04:16 PM   #3
New Member




Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NY
Posts: 21
Original Poster
I thought maybe the shutter priority setting would be the way to go. They will be going very fast so maybe something above 1/1000. How does the bright daylight effect the ISO setting?
12-28-2010, 09:41 PM   #4
Pentaxian
Just1MoreDave's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Aurora, CO
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 4,841
QuoteOriginally posted by robdrobd Quote
I thought maybe the shutter priority setting would be the way to go. They will be going very fast so maybe something above 1/1000. How does the bright daylight effect the ISO setting?
Since the shutter won't be open too long, the ISO might need to be raised to get enough light for the photo. You'll probably be at the longer end of the lens, so the lens will only open to f4.5 or f5.6 - let's say f5.6. At ISO 200, f5.6 and 1/1000, that's Ev 16, or to quote Wikipedia, "Light sand or snow in full or slightly hazy sunlight (distinct shadows)". So you should be OK if it's sunny, but if it's cloudy, think about raising ISO to 800. If it's like 3pm, maybe 1600. Snow is a giant reflector so light will probably be OK.

I think you have a few choices about which mode to start in. It would be nice to choose the Moving Object or Kids mode and the Surf and Snow scene mode at the same time, but it doesn't look like that's possible. The Surf and Snow scene mode will help get the exposure right by overexposing the snow a little. You want that, otherwise you get gray snow. You can do that yourself in Moving Object mode by pressing the +/-Av button to increase exposure compensation by +1.5 or +2.0. The manual doesn't reveal secrets of how ISO is set in Moving Object mode, but it'll probably work fine.

If you want more control, try Tv (shutter priority) mode. Set the exposure for snow by pressing the +/-Av button to increase exposure compensation by +1.5 or +2.0. You also may want to select AF-C for continuous autofocus, and the drive mode to Continuous Shooting Hi. The disadvantage of these choices is the camera will not wait for a focus lock to shoot, and it will fire as long as you hold down the shutter button. (For best speed, turn off Distortion Correction, p. 192 in the manual.) You can also use Auto ISO in this mode.

Shutter priority mode will allow you to set the shutter speed directly with the thumbwheel. That allows you to start at a high speed to freeze the action. Then you can try other things, like panning. That's setting a slower speed, then follow the sled as it gets closer, then fire and continue to follow it, keeping the sled centered. When you do it right, the sled is in sharp focus, with streaks of motion surrounding it.

Also, keep the sun behind you to reduce flare and light up the kids' faces. Practice on other sleds to get the panning right. Take test shots when you arrive to get the exposure compensation right - look for white snow that still has detail, not completely washed out. Bring a big memory card.

12-28-2010, 09:58 PM   #5
Site Supporter
SpecialK's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: So California
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 14,776
You can use a slowish shutter speed like 1/30th and pan with the subject to blur the background slightly, or a faster shutter speed like 1000th to freeze everything. Try both, see what you like. Film is cheap :-)
12-29-2010, 12:14 PM   #6
Veteran Member
RioRico's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Limbo, California
Posts: 11,264
Much good advice above. Other options: Set ISO to AUTO with a range of 100-3200 or -6400. Use Tv (shutter priority) mode and try exposures at 1/100, 1/250, 1/500 seconds, or faster if you really want to stop motion. Use TAv (shutter+aperture priority) mode with the same auto-ISO range, and set the aperture to f/8, of to f/11 for a little more depth-of-field (DOF). Do not worry about high ISO, that's where the Kx excels. If those shots are too noisy for you, set auto-ISO range to 100-1600 or -2400, and widen the aperture a bit to f/5.6 or even f/4.5 for shorter focal lengths.

Experiment. Determine your comfort levels with noise vs ISO, aperture vs DOF, shutter speed vs blurring. Unlike film, shooting digital costs nothing, so shoot shoot shoot. Have fun!
12-29-2010, 07:46 PM   #7
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Mumbai, India
Posts: 396
err,Rico,thanks for the advice,but there's no TAv mode on the K-x. So Tv should be the best mode,correct?
12-29-2010, 07:54 PM   #8
Site Supporter




Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Minneapolis
Photos: Albums
Posts: 588
Snow is bright - don't forget to dial in at least 1 stop +EV and check the histogram/blinkies on a few test shots to confirm.

12-30-2010, 05:15 PM   #9
New Member




Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NY
Posts: 21
Original Poster
Here are the results...Please critique

Well I shot all day in Tv mode with auto ISO on. I shot at 1/1000 and the Auto ISO almost always defaulted to 200. Most time the aperture auto adjusted to somewhere between 4.7 and 7. I tried to slow the shutter speed to 1/30 so I could blur the snow and keep the sled moving, but I am just not that good at panning yet. The bird in hand shot was done from indoors through glass. All pics were taken with kit 18-55 lens. The color seemed to come out ok in everything but the snow. Sometimes it had a blueish tint, other times and old school yellow tint. I am assuming that all has to do with improper exposure?
Attached Images
         
01-02-2011, 04:54 PM   #10
Pentaxian
Just1MoreDave's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Aurora, CO
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 4,841
Well, score one for Wikipedia's exposure chart. That's right about where they suggested. It looks like the second shot was just a little bright, with some of the snow too "white" for detail. The other ones were what I aim for with snow, keeping it just below that limit. When I get back to the computer, I would add some "fill light" to the shots until my wife stopped complaining they were too dark. That's what the slight underexposure allows, room for adjustments later. Focus looks right. I think you also managed to "capture the moment", which can be tough after remembering all the tech stuff.

I practice panning with cars driving by the house - until I collect enough "why is he doing that?" looks.

The snow color is just reality. In shade, snow is reflecting the blue sky and therefore a really cool color temperature. In the sun, its color is warmer, closer to the Daylight preset. The low angle of the sun and snow's white color make all this really stand out. It's not very obvious in July. You can set the white balance for Daylight or Shade, but your photos all have some of both. Someone used to post here with a painting background, and he said he always tried to maintain that blue tint in the shade - how he was taught to paint. You can fix this in processing if you want.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, kit, kit lens, lens, pentax help, photography
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First outdoor concert shots. MrAros Post Your Photos! 1 09-28-2009 07:43 PM
More outdoor shots scott-devon Post Your Photos! 7 01-24-2009 08:51 PM
Lens and settings for action shots sweet bay Pentax DSLR Discussion 12 03-27-2008 10:31 AM
Outdoor car show shots. blwnhr Post Your Photos! 16 01-30-2008 05:09 AM
first outdoor shots acrbill Post Your Photos! 5 10-14-2006 03:40 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:40 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top