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02-02-2011, 12:38 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by Balog Quote
I started "Understanding Exposure" but I must admit I've gotten a bit discouraged by it. He explains the "exposure triangle" well, but when I got to the part about ISO he made some very disparaging comments on higher iso's and specifically stated he was primarily a natural light shooter and assumed his audience was as well. Since the majority of my pictures are taken indoors at night, it rather seemed like Mr Peterson was telling me his book wasn't for me.
You must put it into context. The book was revised in 2004, and not many changes are reflected in the latest 3rd revised edition. So the advice on ISO in the book will be as conservative as the advice could be in 2004, when dSLRs were very expensive, had low resolution and pretty ordinary high ISO performance. His advice was quite reasonable for the time, not quite so applicable today. But such is technology - it continues to develop at an exponential rate.

Brian's book nevertheless is quite well suited to the discerning available light landscape and portrait photographer and I think his book does well to develop the skill of ambient light photography. If you're looking for advice on other areas of photography, there are a number of other books that shed light on the subject in more detail.

02-02-2011, 12:46 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Balog Quote
I started "Understanding Exposure" but I must admit I've gotten a bit discouraged by it. He explains the "exposure triangle" well, but when I got to the part about ISO he made some very disparaging comments on higher iso's and specifically stated he was primarily a natural light shooter and assumed his audience was as well. Since the majority of my pictures are taken indoors at night, it rather seemed like Mr Peterson was telling me his book wasn't for me.
Well, I haven't read that book, but a lot of people who'll teach you photography will get pretty opinionated on various subjects.

The tech's changing pretty fast as regards what high-ISO is capable of, too, which is something to keep in mind.

Personally, I'm less down on it than *that* sounds, but then again, I like the sense of texture I get, particularly regarding monochrome: helps an old film shooter feel more connected to the medium, I suppose. The real question is if what you get is what looks good, to yourself and/or whoever you're trying to please or inspire.

But, I was like that in film days, too: it was never the finest-grained films I would go for, but the ones where it *looked* best to me, and had the other qualities I liked.

You want to be *able* to get the technically-best results you can, probably. But don't let anyone tell you not to like anything else.
02-02-2011, 01:06 PM   #18
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OK, I am sure all of the books mentioned here are a good starting point, as is you camera manual, but nothing is going to replace the practical hands-on experience you will get from taking pictures--lots and lots of them--to experiment and find out what is really going on with exposure and light.

Put the camera in MANUAL mode and use the built-in exposure meter to guide your exposures. Now:

1. Experiment with all of the various ISOs and note how they affect shutter speed and aperture. Also note how the higher ISOs will produce more noise in the image. Then,
2. Concentrate on the aperture and note how it affects the shutter speed and can be controlled by ISO. Also note how the aperture changes the depth-of-field. Then,
3. Concentrate on shutter speed and note its relation to ISO and aperture. Also experiment to see how shutter speed affects focus and sharpness.

Go crazy with this stuff with the primary objective to learn what is happening when a photo is made. Take hundreds of shots if desired. It's free!

When you're examining your photos on the computer, most software allows you to see the EXIF information which will tell you shutter speed, aperture, ISO, lens, etc. and make it easy to compare the results.

Now, even you if you decide to go back to shooting in one of the auto or semi-auto modes, at least you know what the camera is doing when it makes certain compromises in exposure.

Also, do not underestimate the huge benefits of shooting with a tripod when possible!

HTH

Trust me. I own a tractor.
02-02-2011, 03:11 PM   #19
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First read the Pentax K-X instruction book

02-03-2011, 02:34 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by DaveHolmes Quote
This is one I'm missing... As good as 'Eye'?
Haven't read it yet but it seems as good as the others. It's got very good reviews...
02-03-2011, 02:35 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by bobmaxja Quote
First read the Pentax K-X instruction book
I did but to be honest it doesn't really make sense until you start to use your camera.

Anyway I think we'll all get to the same conclusion which is = I need to practise
02-03-2011, 02:36 AM   #22
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@Ajoe : what do you call "noise" in a picture?

(FYI, I'm french so I might ask lots of stupid vocabulary questions)
02-03-2011, 02:46 AM   #23
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"Noise" is the grainy texture of the photo.

02-03-2011, 05:17 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Secret Elkina Quote
@Ajoe : what do you call "noise" in a picture?
You can easily see grain if you take a picture with a smooth black surface in it. Take the picture at a low ISO and another at a high ISO, then zoom in on the black object and compare the difference in the two images.

The noise will affect the whole picture and all colors, but is really easy to see on black objects.
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