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01-30-2011, 04:53 AM   #1
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MX Film door removal

I've done a couple of searches with different key words, but come up with nothing both here and on a google search (even though I've accidentally stumbled across something on the subject a few weeks back!), so if it has been convered before, I'm sorry for repeating it.

I got a grotty old MX as a Christmas present (but seems to be fully functioning from the first two test rolls). It has a rusty film door which could do with a rub down and re-paint. I'd prefer not to do this with the door on the body, but can't get the thing off.

I can see what appears to be a slide-pin type arrangement on the hinge, with what seems to be a small pin (or a "squashed" screw? - certainly can't get a flat end screwdriver in to it in its current condition) that needs to be pushed down to drop the hinge-pin out of the top socket. I've applied some downward pressure to the pin but without success . . . . and I really didn't want to apply to much force for fear of committing a working camera to the scrapheap.

If anyone can point me in the right direction on how to do this without damaging the little MX, I'd be grateful.

Thanks in advance,

Gary.

01-30-2011, 04:06 PM   #2
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It should slide down with your fingernail, might have to swing the door back and forth some while applying pressure.
01-30-2011, 04:14 PM   #3
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The screw is attached to the hinge pin, sliding it down will release the back cover.
Maybe a tiny drop of WD-40 or something similar will be needed.
Here is one on a Super-Program.

Last edited by Ex Finn.; 11-11-2014 at 05:49 PM.
01-30-2011, 11:07 PM   #4
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Ex Finn - that's a great help to me.

I was fearing that the screw would have to be, well, 'unscrewed' - and the one on mine does not look like a screw anymore - just a blob of metal!

I'll get a little penetrating oil in there and give it a wiggle.

Thanks very much for giving me the time of day (and taking the photo - a picture paints a tho . . . . . . . . ah - you know how it goes )

01-31-2011, 02:44 PM   #5
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No prob. hope it works out.
01-31-2011, 04:11 PM   #6
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It hasn't quite worked out - probably because I've been impatient.

Don't laugh at (or scold) me - the gentle approach of repeated application of tiny quantities of a penetrating oil and constant movement of the door yielded absolutely nothing. I eventually resorted to some watch-repair type tools (toy hammer and various drive-pins) and very gently tapped the hinge slide-pin back down in to the door. The door was wiggled and out it came - an apparently good result.

The down side - the pin was pushed tight to the other end of its travel in the recess and, despite best efforts with a bit more penetrating oil and application of force through the end of a flat blade screwdriver, it would not move back to where it came from!

I've had to butcher the door by filing away a small part of the 'tube' at the hinge end of the door in order to gain some purchase to tap the hinge-pin back out (partly at least).

I'm not convinced even if I had shown some patience and let the penetrating oil do some work for a couple of days that I would have avoided resorting to such drastic measures on a relatively delicate, simple mechanism - I belive it was pretty much FUBAR before the camera came in to my possession . . . . . and it certainly is now. It will ever operate as the manufacturer intended again but should, hopefully, not need to be removed by the 'tap the pin back in' method for a long while after its reinstalled.

Now all I have to do is rub down the flaked paint and rusty steel, apply some rust inhibitor and apply some black paint - at least the film pressure plate popped out easily

. . . . all because I want to change the light seals I don't get this hassle with my (forgive me) 450D, but neither do I get the satisfaction of collecting 38 or so 'real' photo prints.

Sorry for the essay above. Regardless of my little misadventure, your comments have been helpful.

Thanks,

Gary.
01-31-2011, 05:04 PM   #7
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Darn, that thing must have been pretty corroded. Too late now but I would have let the penetrating oil sit there for a lot longer.
Just write it off as a learning experience on how to work on old stuff.
BTW, dealing with FUBAR is good, it builds character.

Last edited by Ex Finn.; 01-31-2011 at 05:12 PM.
01-31-2011, 05:39 PM   #8
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I should have taken some before and aftere photos to show the state of the 'screw' - I'm sure it's been abused in the past and I think this abuse is the reason for the current fault, gut feeling is that there's a slight compression or bend in the door hinge 'tube'.

"BTW, dealing with FUBAR is good, it builds character"

I like your train of thought. My kids don't seem to be convinced by this as they struggle along with 12 year old cars (I have bought them relatively cheap late 90s Rovers instead of building a trust fund) when their friends are driving about in newer metal. They are however starting to understand that the things that many people consider flaws and faults should actually be considered as "character".

01-31-2011, 07:23 PM   #9
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Yes, before and after pictures are always good. Don`t mention Rovers, I have a`62 Austin- Healey Sprite in the garage, with original 52k miles on it.
And not too rusted, may I add. She has a lot of that old car "character".
P.S. Why would anyone ever think that a felt seal would hold back oil in the first place. Darn Brits.

Last edited by Ex Finn.; 01-31-2011 at 07:53 PM.
02-01-2011, 10:24 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ex Finn. Quote
. . . . . She has a lot of that old car "character".
P.S. Why would anyone ever think that a felt seal would hold back oil in the first place. Darn Brits.
At least your car is a proper classic. As for the felt seal - consider it a warning device - if the oils stops leaking, you have a problem - there's no oil left. I hope you get stuck in to the oily bits of the old girl too - it's more fun than handing it over to a garage.

I should be able to fiddle around this evening to prepare the rusty bits on the film door ready to give it a bit of black enamel paint tomorrow. May be able to clean off the residue from the old light seals / foam / sticky stuff tonight too.
02-01-2011, 11:49 AM   #11
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Before responsibility set in my hobby was a 1970 MGB - BRG over Tan. Who in the British Empire ever decided British Leyland was a good idea?

Before photography my hobby was a 1984 Volvo GLT-Turbo Wagon. I bought it for my wife new when our first child was born (we were parental safety hounds before it was cool to be a parental safety hound). My son had a minor contretemps with that car in 2007. I tried to buy it for salvage with the insurance money (the woman he rear-ended insisted that insurance should pay for her car, so they "adjusted" mine as well) and repair it myself but I was grossly outbid by a dealer who wanted the parts..

Now I own Subaru's and Hondas - they're good, but they're just not the same.
02-01-2011, 12:58 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by monochrome Quote
Before responsibility set in my hobby was a 1970 MGB - BRG over Tan. Who in the British Empire ever decided British Leyland was a good idea?
Good choice with the MGB, they have a very strong following and support structure in the UK.

As for the BL question, without it, I would not be driving around in one of the very last British made MG saloons (March 2005 just before the then descendant of BL - MGRover went under, turning my 3 year warranty in to a 3 week warranty). You won't have seen them in the US - It is an MG ZS 180 - built on very humble Honda / Rover underpinnings but given the once over by MGR's very talented group of engineers. Small by US standards and flat out speed in a straight line is not its forte. It does however outhandle my wifes Impreza WRX 2.5 turbo (now I think you do have those over there) and on a dry day, despite the MG's Power and torque deficit, it compares very favourably to the Subaru (completely different story in the wet though)

Nearly 6 years and getting on for 110k miles, its been a great car even though it's been very much engineered to cost rather than engineered to 'work' (but it does that nicely too) I can categorically state that the guys at MGR knew how to build a good car. No V8 (I will get one one day), but the V6 has been very entertaining and reliable so far.

I've no idea what this all has to do with a Pentax MX, but that's the natural progression of forum threads as we natter on - and it's all the better for it too

Right - off to find the rust inhibitor in the shed (for the MX not any of the cars . . . . . honest!)
02-01-2011, 02:08 PM   #13
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Yep. Nothing builds better character than a Lucas electric system, wire wheels and up-draft SU carbs in an MG A Coupe.

H2
02-01-2011, 03:46 PM   #14
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To continue the motoring theme, I'm a little envious of the metal some of you guys have.

My little "classic of the future" (ever the optimist am I) is a Rover 200 BRM LE. If I were to try to describe from an American persective, I suppose it'd go a bit like "funny looking small hatchback with a 4 pot". I mention it as the gentleman from whom I purchased the car was also he proud owner of:

Jaguar X type as a daily driver (nothing too exciting there, but I quite like it)
A genuine MGB GT V8 - a nice black example with the steel Rostyle wheels
And the pick of the bunch for me, was an MGA roadster in a navy blue colour with wire wheels.

Both his MGs appeared to be (in my opinion) to the standard of 'class winner' in local car shows.

So, Mr. Pacerr and Ex Finn, I am jealous of your chosen mode of transport. I will eventually do both of the following to emulate or compete (famous last words):

1. Build a car from scratch or from a kit (OK, I probably know already it will be from a kit and NOT from scratch)
2. "Save" a proper classic - I'm not bothered about any particular model, but it will probably have been built by my neighbours in England during the 50's, 60's or 70's.

The problem I have is that my general rate of progress is such that I've just decribed about 25 years worth of weekend work above!

Back to somewhere near the original topic - I've found the bottle of "Kurust" in the shed, cleaned away all of the loose black paint on the film door and applied the rust treatment. While that's been drying, I've removed and cleaned up the back of the MX body and started to install some new light seals. I'm having to repeatedly place a new clean sheet of paper on the kitchen worktop as the 'old' one gets covered in bits of gunk, fluff and general crud - I can't believe how much muck is generated from such a small thing as an MX.

I'm not sure how paranoid I should be about the fluff getting in to the workings of the camera.
02-01-2011, 04:14 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by garythesnail Quote
I'm not sure how paranoid I should be about the fluff getting in to the workings of the camera.
Keep all that gunk out of the camera. I am sure it will do no good if it gets in the shutter.
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