Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
02-20-2011, 05:30 PM   #1
Veteran Member
RonakG's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, CA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 603
Too bright background

Hi,

We went to a beach today. The weather was perfect, a sunny day. Some of the photos (not all) has such very bright background. What is causing this? I compared such photos with normal photos (with rightly exposed background) but I find no difference in camera settings.

Is it the metering? Here are the settings I'm using right now.

P - mode, AF.S, Matrix Metering, ISO range 100-3200. Photos are of my wife.

View Picture EXIF
Name:  IMGP1051.JPG
Views: 1184
Size:  162.0 KB
EXIF - 1/200, f5.6, ISO 100

Attachment 84249
EXIF - 1/200, f4.5, ISO 100

Attachment 84250
EXIF - 1/200, f5, ISO 100


Last edited by RonakG; 10-05-2013 at 12:05 PM.
02-20-2011, 05:49 PM   #2
Site Supporter
SpecialK's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: So California
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 14,429
You are exposing for the shadows, so the bright portions get brighter.
02-20-2011, 06:12 PM   #3
Millionth Poster!
Scottnorwo's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Stafford, New York
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,066
to achieve a balance where the background is also exposed properly, you can make use of your flash. the flash will expose your wife in the forground and your metering for the background will expose that properly. good luck.
The photos you took are very nice, your wife should like them
02-20-2011, 08:05 PM   #4
Veteran Member
RonakG's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, CA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 603
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by SpecialK Quote
You are exposing for the shadows, so the bright portions get brighter.
That was my guess too. But if I don't expose that way, wouldn't the subject be too dark too? Would it have been possible to recover it in the RAW file? I haven't got the hang of processing RAW files yet, so still shooting in JPEG.

QuoteOriginally posted by Scottnorwo Quote
to achieve a balance where the background is also exposed properly, you can make use of your flash. the flash will expose your wife in the forground and your metering for the background will expose that properly. good luck.
The photos you took are very nice, your wife should like them
That's a good idea. Never thought of using flash on such a bright day. Thanks for the tip. And yeah, she is happy with other photos which turned out good.

02-20-2011, 09:06 PM   #5
Veteran Member
RioRico's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Limbo, California
Posts: 11,264
QuoteOriginally posted by RonakG Quote
That's a good idea. Never thought of using flash on such a bright day.
If you view any videos or sequences documenting still or cine shoots at beaches, you'll see LOTS of elaborate lighting systems employed. The dynamic range of light there is tremendously greater than film or sensors can record, so fill-flash and/or controlled lights are vital. Your little onboard flash probably won't make much impact -- you'll likely need something stronger.

Also, bright days are the WORST time for much beach shooting, especially with digital sensors, too many of which tend to hate clear blue skies. Dynamic range, white balance, these are troublesome; and those clear skies show every speck of dust on the sensor, and may even cause JPEG artifacts. Give me clouds and overcast any time, eh?

For such a bright day, I think the pictures of your wife are fine.
02-20-2011, 09:14 PM   #6
Pentaxian
twitch's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 4,571
I'm amazed it exposed so well for your subject given you were in multi segment metering mode.

As to the background completely blowing out, fill flash would have helped you in this case, however your pop up flash is bascially useless in this situation as you needed about 1/1000 maybe more shutter, but the pop up wont let you shoot faster than 1/180. To shoot at faster than 1/180 you need an external flash that is p-TTL capable and has High Speed Sync. IMHO it's the best $200-ish you can spend to improve your photos indoors and out.
02-20-2011, 09:36 PM   #7
Pentaxian
Just1MoreDave's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Aurora, CO
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 4,814
QuoteOriginally posted by twitch Quote
I'm amazed it exposed so well for your subject given you were in multi segment metering mode.
Yes. I would be celebrating successfully getting photos of my wife, properly exposed and metered, even smiling. Who cares about the background?
02-20-2011, 09:58 PM   #8
Ash
Community Manager
Loyal Site Supporter
Ash's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Toowoomba, Queensland
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 22,678
Balancing backgrounds means getting strong supplemental lighting to match the exposure of your intended subject with that of the background. That's why flash is a virtue in these settings, but you may also find most flashes not powerful enough to come close to, let alone exceed, the power of full sun.

02-21-2011, 02:39 AM   #9
Pentaxian




Join Date: Aug 2007
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,563
I must agree with Twitch, the results look very good for the circumstances.
The other option would have been: proper exposed skies with under exposed shadows (=you wife).

Do you preview your photo's after they are taken?
Do you look at the histogram?

I've put the first picture in Lightroom, and the histogram looks like this:

Name:  Capture 2 histogram.JPG
Views: 865
Size:  16.0 KB

Notice that it is almost balanced but not completely.
There is too much high light.
That is because matrix metering mode gives more preference of the centre of the picture, where your wife is.

I still think the camera did a great job here!

That belongs to this photo:
Name:  Capture 2.JPG
Views: 881
Size:  68.4 KB

If I do 10 seconds work in Lightroom on the photo, I can change the histogram to look like this:

Name:  Capture 1 histogram.JPG
Views: 910
Size:  16.0 KB

Look at the histogram, much more midtone and a much better balance overall.

And then the photo looks like this:

Name:  Capture 1.JPG
Views: 938
Size:  83.7 KB

Unfortunatly the sky is too much clipped to recover better than this...
Access to the RAW file would haven given more headroom to recover high lights and therefore better results.

If you would have noticed the histogram on the beach, you might have taken the photo again with Ev -1 or Ev -2 and you'd probably have been able to come up with a realy good picture in postprocessing.

So, yes, a flash helps. But it *very much* changes the appearance of a photo to me.

My advise is:
- Turn on the histogram on the preview mode, and study it directly.
- Shoot RAW for maximum recovery capability.

You can then compensate for difficult light conditions and try to balance the total amoutn of dynamic range in the photo taken on site.
And later touch up the results on the computer.

Hope this helped.

Cheers, Bert

Last edited by bymy141; 02-21-2011 at 05:48 AM.
02-21-2011, 05:09 AM   #10
Loyal Site Supporter
dadipentak's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 10,073
QuoteOriginally posted by Just1MoreDave Quote
Yes. I would be celebrating successfully getting photos of my wife, properly exposed and metered, even smiling. Who cares about the background?
Right.
02-21-2011, 05:34 AM   #11
Veteran Member
Gashog's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: NY
Photos: Albums
Posts: 523
These look good to me.
The only things I can add is to shoot into the sun and close to the water. I try to use the sun as a hair light and the sand to bounce the sun off to light the face.
To do this, you need fill flash and a lens hood of course.
Don't under estimate the pop up flash.
02-21-2011, 09:41 AM   #12
Veteran Member
RonakG's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bay Area, CA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 603
Original Poster
Thanks everyone for very good suggestions. There is still a lot to learn. I'm going through the Understanding Exposure book right now, that should help.

I do keep histogram ON for preview but the K-x LCD was virtually useless on that bright day.

I am not shooting RAW as I'm not at all comfortable with processing involved yet. I do have LR3 but yet to start reading on that. I have tried RAW but my JPEGs so far are more pleasing to default RAW output.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
background, camera, exif, iso, pentax help, photography, photos, settings
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Inexpensive High Quality Bright White Continuous Background Paper brecklundin Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 8 12-07-2009 10:30 AM
Background eccs19 Photographic Technique 1 11-24-2009 08:38 AM
Deloraine background deloraine Welcomes and Introductions 3 01-31-2009 01:16 PM
Need some PP Background help paden501 Post Your Photos! 11 12-07-2008 10:33 AM
Question Background Color MJB DIGITAL Site Suggestions and Help 3 09-01-2008 12:21 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:11 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top