Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
03-13-2011, 12:47 PM   #16
Ira
Inactive Account




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Coral Springs, FL
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,216
I'm no expert on churches and museums (they make me itch), but when you're in there, don't forget to look for the small architectural and art details as well, where you won't go wide.

But for wide, I agree with the Pentax 12-24 or Sigma 10-20. Big difference between 16 and 12 or 10.

03-14-2011, 02:31 AM   #17
Veteran Member




Join Date: Aug 2007
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,563
QuoteOriginally posted by Ogion Quote
Bymy one of your suggestions is Sigma 10-20, but it stops down at 4.5 Is it works at low light?. By the why, your picture is impressive I would like to know the setting too.
It took some time for me to react, sorry: K-7, f3.5, ISO 400, 1/13s

The church is the Peter and Paul Catherdral in St Petersburg, Russia.

Cheers, Bert
03-14-2011, 07:19 AM   #18
Senior Member




Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Buenos Aires
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 111
Original Poster
Yesterday, I went to an old church to shot in low light conditions to test my kit lens (18-55 f/3.5-5.6WR), and myself. Please, go to my album and let me know what you think about them.

Ogion's Albums - PentaxForums.com

Finally, I'll follow your advice and get a wider lens

Thank you
Regards

Last edited by Ogion; 03-14-2011 at 12:36 PM.
03-14-2011, 07:25 AM   #19
Senior Member




Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Buenos Aires
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 111
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Ira Quote
I'm no expert on churches and museums (they make me itch), but when you're in there, don't forget to look for the small architectural and art details as well, where you won't go wide.

But for wide, I agree with the Pentax 12-24 or Sigma 10-20. Big difference between 16 and 12 or 10.
Ira, I'm not an axpert also and I already think about small architectural and art details, so I'll carry a second lens to shot them, it isn't what I like most, I mean switch lenses, but there isn't other way.
Thank you for your advise!
Regards

03-14-2011, 07:27 AM   #20
Senior Member




Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Buenos Aires
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 111
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by bymy141 Quote
It took some time for me to react, sorry: K-7, f3.5, ISO 400, 1/13s

The church is the Peter and Paul Catherdral in St Petersburg, Russia.

Cheers, Bert

Thank you for shearing!
03-14-2011, 07:43 AM   #21
Inactive Account




Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Long Island, N.Y.
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,124
QuoteOriginally posted by Ogion Quote
Yesterday, I went to an old church to shot in low light conditions to test my kit lens (18-55 f/3.5-4.5WR), and myself. Please, go to my album and let me know what you think about them.
Very nicely done, especially for a first time out there.
If you need to gain more confidence in low ambient light shooting, go out in the evening and shoot street scenes or archetectural features. Want to test yourself? Turn off shake reduction and keep shooting. Posture means a lot in night time photography. Stand comfortably, keep your elbows tucked in next to your bady as much as possible, take a deep normal breath and gently squeeze the trigger (push the shutter button). If there are things to lean against, use them to help steady yourself. (When your done practicing, remember to turn the shake reduction back on.)

Remember, that wider lens will help you make more dramatic and all encompassing compositions. It is technique and practice that will make you a better low light photographer.
03-14-2011, 10:36 AM   #22
Senior Member




Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Buenos Aires
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 111
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by calicojack Quote
Very nicely done, especially for a first time out there.
If you need to gain more confidence in low ambient light shooting, go out in the evening and shoot street scenes or archetectural features. Want to test yourself? Turn off shake reduction and keep shooting. Posture means a lot in night time photography. Stand comfortably, keep your elbows tucked in next to your bady as much as possible, take a deep normal breath and gently squeeze the trigger (push the shutter button). If there are things to lean against, use them to help steady yourself. (When your done practicing, remember to turn the shake reduction back on.)

Remember, that wider lens will help you make more dramatic and all encompassing compositions. It is technique and practice that will make you a better low light photographer.
A lot of tips to practice! I'll need to go out more often and work hard
I'm glad you think that my pictures are nice, I appreciate that!

Regards
03-14-2011, 11:38 AM   #23
Junior Member




Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Houston, TX USA
Posts: 32
QuoteOriginally posted by calicojack Quote
Ogion,
Try this. Go to my webshots albums from our recent trip to Europe and look for pictures like you imagine you will be taking. When you look at the individual pictures, you can scroll down and see what the exposures were and most of the exif info. Be aware there were three cameras taking pictures, my wife's K200D, my Mother in law's Optio W60, and my K10D. Your K7 should be at least as capable as these models in reduced lighting. You can also go further back in time and see albums from Greece and Italy.
The link to my albums is:
briantimmins's photos and albums on webshots
Just in case it gets messed up, you may need to "Sort By" "Newest First"
The album names are:
9-19-2010 Munich
9-20-2010 Munich to Prague
9-21-2010 Prague
9-22-2010 Bratislava / Budapest
9-23-2010 Budapest
9-24-2010 Vienna
9-25-2010 Vienna
9-26-2010 Danube / St.Gilgen / Salzburg
9-27-2010 Berchtesgaden (Hitler's Eagle's Nest) / Salzburg / Oberammagau
9-28-2010 Oberammagau
9-29-2010 Oberammagau / Dachau (Concentration Camp) / Munich HBH (Hoffbrau House)
I know I am a day late in this conversation, but I just opened the forum to check on something and saw your response and the photo albums you posted. Good photography. Just curious about the night time shots in the Bratislava album. Do you remember the ISO setting, or did you keep it at around 200 or so? Just curious since I intend to get more into night time photography. They showed good night time detail.

03-14-2011, 12:08 PM   #24
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Tumbleweed, Arizona
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,107
I tend to do a lot of my shooting in the evenings. I prefer ISO 100 and f8 - however that pushes me in to longer exposures which means a tripod. I have heard that a number of places frown on tripods, but a small tripod should work - sitting it on the seat of a pew, floor shooting up, etc. I have an L bracket with a wired external shutter release attached - and it tends to work pretty well. I also try to bracket in order to adjust the light and pull out the details, as opposed to trying to create an extreme HDR. With the ambient light, I also tend to use manual hyperfocusing.
03-14-2011, 01:07 PM   #25
Inactive Account




Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Long Island, N.Y.
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,124
QuoteOriginally posted by Stardog Quote
I know I am a day late in this conversation, but I just opened the forum to check on something and saw your response and the photo albums you posted. Good photography. Just curious about the night time shots in the Bratislava album. Do you remember the ISO setting, or did you keep it at around 200 or so? Just curious since I intend to get more into night time photography. They showed good night time detail.
Remember there are three cameras being used by three people (but all three are pretty much set up by me) All three cameras are set on Auto ISO. My K10D is allowed to go as high as 1000. My wife's K200D is allowed to go to 1250. My Mother in Law's Optio W60 is limited to 800. We've found that these limits work OK for our cameras.
Brian T
03-14-2011, 01:37 PM   #26
Veteran Member
Frogfish's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 4,490
QuoteOriginally posted by Ira Quote
I'm no expert on churches and museums (they make me itch), but when you're in there, don't forget to look for the small architectural and art details as well, where you won't go wide.

But for wide, I agree with the Pentax 12-24 or Sigma 10-20. Big difference between 16 and 12 or 10.
Big difference between 10 and 12 mm too !

I would agree with the option someone above mentioned Sigma 10-20 F4-5.6 (not the newer one which is not as sharp - both are still available) and a Tamron 17-50/2.8. That's a great kit for cities and churches etc.

BTW I do a lot of property interiors and the Green setting works wonders for constantly changing light conditions from room to room. Though you do need to be able to hand-hold (or lean against something, steady the camera against something) to get down to 1/20 etc.
03-14-2011, 07:30 PM   #27
Senior Member




Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Buenos Aires
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 111
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Frogfish Quote
Big difference between 10 and 12 mm too !

I would agree with the option someone above mentioned Sigma 10-20 F4-5.6 (not the newer one which is not as sharp - both are still available) and a Tamron 17-50/2.8. That's a great kit for cities and churches etc.

BTW I do a lot of property interiors and the Green setting works wonders for constantly changing light conditions from room to room. Though you do need to be able to hand-hold (or lean against something, steady the camera against something) to get down to 1/20 etc.
Hi frogfish!
I've found this three sigma on ebay, which one are you refering to?
Thanks for your help

Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 AF Lens f/ Pentax K5 K7 Kr Kx - eBay (item 180638084216 end time Apr-09-11 14:52:21 PDT)

Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6D HSM Lens Pentax K5 K7 Kr Kx+ KIT - eBay (item 160557586390 end time Apr-09-11 14:59:26 PDT)

Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC J Autofocus Lens for Pentax - eBay (item 290532753534 end time Apr-10-11 14:04:03 PDT)
03-14-2011, 08:07 PM   #28
Pentaxian
twitch's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 4,571
This was shot with a DA15, I wish I had wider with me at the time

03-14-2011, 08:43 PM   #29
Veteran Member
Frogfish's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 4,490
Hi Ogion.

The first one is the new one - most people agree the older one (#2 and #3) is sharper as it's not often you need the constant fstop in this type of lense.

The second and third look the same (however note they have got the title wrong in #2 - none of these are HSM lenses, as you can even see written on the box).

Good Luck !
03-15-2011, 07:23 AM   #30
Senior Member




Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Buenos Aires
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 111
Original Poster
I would like to introduce another player: DA 10-17mm f/3.5-4.5 ED (IF). Any experience? What do think?
Regards
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, lens, pentax help, photography, question
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
lens question - manual lens won't fire wackymummy Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 7 05-21-2010 10:16 AM
Question on K-7 and lens Uncle_dad Pentax DSLR Discussion 1 05-09-2010 05:37 PM
New Kx and lens question. Myltlpny Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 5 03-14-2010 08:47 AM
FF Lens question... Jasvox Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 3 04-18-2008 02:16 AM
Newb AF lens question about lens for K10D pentaxbling Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 3 08-15-2007 05:52 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:27 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top