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04-11-2011, 03:30 PM   #1
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AE Lock

Is it possible to set the exposure lock to lock for other shots as well as the shot you locked in? (without having to relock the exposure every shot)
oops forgot to mention it is a K10D

thanks

04-11-2011, 03:52 PM   #2
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For the K10D, the AE is locked for 20 sec by default. You can change the time to 6 sec or 60 sec in the Custom menu (2X the "Meter Operating Time").

The AE lock is in effect for the whole time or until you change mode, or push AE-lock button.

Taking a shot does not cancel the AE lock.
04-11-2011, 04:04 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by SOldBear Quote
For the K10D, the AE is locked for 20 sec by default. You can change the time to 6 sec or 60 sec in the Custom menu (2X the "Meter Operating Time").

The AE lock is in effect for the whole time or until you change mode, or push AE-lock button.

Taking a shot does not cancel the AE lock.
so if I change the ae setting to 60 seconds, it stays locked just for 60 seconds then unlocks?

thanks

cheers
04-11-2011, 08:09 PM   #4
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Yep, it's called manual mode.

04-12-2011, 12:23 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by mtroute Quote
Yep, it's called manual mode.
Agree. Remember the settings when you are ready to take the shot, then dial them in in manual mode.
04-14-2011, 04:03 AM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by slip Quote
Is it possible to set the exposure lock to lock for other shots as well as the shot you locked in? (without having to relock the exposure every shot)
oops forgot to mention it is a K10D

thanks
All post above have covered your question enough I think, however, there is some tricky thing about AE lock I like to mention.

When I take my K-5 (you want one I read) out of the bag, I flip the powerswitch in one move, and sometimes accidently push the AE lock button with my thumb right after.
Since the lens cap is still on (next step), the AE will lock for darkness.
The result is that the first shot (at least) right after is completely over exposed.
It took me a long time to understand what had happened.

And I find it hard to change my habits...

Bert
04-14-2011, 09:24 AM   #7
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I'll extend the suggestions for M(anual) mode: When you want to lock-in an exposure, go to M(anual) FIRST and punch the Green button.

Example: Last year on a long journey around the SouthWest USA (which I will soon reprise, with variations) I stayed a week in Sedona Arizona. A couple days were spent cruising around the Red Rock country under blue skies with puffy clouds. I mostly used the DA18-250 for 'scapes narrow to wide. And I got my best results by manually metering till I got an optimal exposure, and staying there, no matter the percentage of the frame filled with sky, clouds, rocks, brush, etc.

In any AE mode, those varying percentages would have driven exposures all over the place. Yes, certain shots called for separate metering, for shadow detail etc. But under consistent light, stay with consistent exposure. That's what the Sunny-16 rule is about. That's why advanced metering looks at incident light, not reflected light. Sure, meter the subject, if the subject is of medium brightness. But meter the light if you want consistent results.
04-14-2011, 01:06 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by RioRico Quote
That's what the Sunny-16 rule is about. That's why advanced metering looks at incident light, not reflected light. Sure, meter the subject, if the subject is of medium brightness. But meter the light if you want consistent results.
In my attempt to soak up any of the knowledge you have to offer:
First, what is the sunny-16 rule?
Second, when you use the term meter as a verb how exactly do you do this with the camera, do I need to change my settings to center weighted metering and then use the AF button to lock the exposure in M mode?

04-14-2011, 03:27 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by littledrawe Quote
In my attempt to soak up any of the knowledge you have to offer:
First, what is the sunny-16 rule?
Second, when you use the term meter as a verb how exactly do you do this with the camera, do I need to change my settings to center weighted metering and then use the AF button to lock the exposure in M mode?
this is a good explanation of the rule...

Sunny 16 rule - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
04-14-2011, 07:37 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by littledrawe Quote
In my attempt to soak up any of the knowledge you have to offer:
First, what is the sunny-16 rule?
mtroute pointed you to a great explanation.

QuoteQuote:
Second, when you use the term meter as a verb how exactly do you do this with the camera, do I need to change my settings to center weighted metering and then use the AF button to lock the exposure in M mode?
The AF button sets the focus, not the light metering.

To 'meter' is to take a light reading. To "meter off" something is to take a reading of reflected light from an object. In M(anual) mode, press the Green button. This takes a light reading, and stores it as exposure settings. Until you change those settings, or go into an Auto mode (P, Av, Sv, etc) they will be used whenever you press the shutter.

That is the basic action. USING it is something else. One trick: Set metering to center-weighted, and meter off something of middle brightness, or what you want the camera to record as middle brightness. For instance, if your subject is about as bright as your skin, meter off your hand! Or look for a scene that is medium bright, and meter off it. Now SHOOT.

Another trick: Set metering to SPOT. Meter the BRIGHTEST bit of the scene you are shooting. Make a note of the exposure. Now meter the DARKEST bit of your scene. Note that exposure. Now set the camera to halfway in-between. So if your BRIGHT metering is 1/250th second at f/16, and the DARK metering is 1/250 at f/2, set the camera to the halfway point, 1/250th at f/5.6. And SHOOT.

[Think of this f-stop scale: 2--2.8--4--5.6--8--11--16 and note that f/5.6 is three stops faster than f/11, and three stops slower than f/2.]

The basic method is just to point, meter, and SHOOT. That way, or with either of the above tricks, your next step is to CHIMP: review the picture. If it is too dark or light, adjust the exposure by changing the shutter speed or aperture. With a consistently lit subject, once you get an exposure you like, you can keep shooting with the same settings, and everything in the scene will remain the same brightness.

So, going back to my Sedona AZ example: I set M(anual) mode and metered off the Red Rocks, off a mixture of Red Rocks and foliage, and off the foliage (brush and trees). I pointed at each and hit the Green button, then took some test shots. I found that in daytime, settings of ISO 100, 1/200 at f/8 gave me well-balanced exposures, no matter what focal length I used with the DA18-250 lens on my K20D. Yes, I reviewed (chimped) pictures, and sometimes tweaked the aperture to f/7 or f/9 or beyond as needed. But the daylight let me keep consistent exposures.
04-14-2011, 08:23 PM   #11
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Unfortuneatly the K2000 doesn't have a green button . . . . .

Last edited by littledrawe; 04-14-2011 at 08:45 PM.
04-16-2011, 05:37 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by littledrawe Quote
Unfortuneatly the K2000 doesn't have a green button . . . . .
When using a K-m or K2000 in manual mode, the "Green" button is the "Av+/-" button, so YES, the K2000 does have the green button, it's just not green...
04-16-2011, 09:57 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by theunartist Quote
When using a K-m or K2000 in manual mode, the "Green" button is the "Av+/-" button, so YES, the K2000 does have the green button, it's just not green...
Thanks, I was reading the manual and it didn't seem real clear to me as well as it sounds like other models have a literal green button. Maybe its time to jump up to a K-7!
04-16-2011, 11:02 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by littledrawe Quote
Thanks, I was reading the manual and it didn't seem real clear to me as well as it sounds like other models have a literal green button. Maybe its time to jump up to a K-7!
I think the K-m is a great camera, the only reason I got a k10 was for my really heavy manual lenses. I was afraid with everyday use, the lenses would start "distorting" the K-m mount and/or body frame.
04-16-2011, 03:37 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by theunartist Quote
I think the K-m is a great camera
It has treated me well thus far, occasionally I am faced with its limitations and that is one you mention there. I have big hands and I long for something a little more substantial to grab onto, my pinkie literally won't fit on the grip with the rest of my fingers and this is more frustrating the bigger the lenses get. It would be nice if they made a dummy grip that could be attached just for that purpose.
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