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05-19-2011, 05:24 AM   #31
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Speaking as a beginner myself (less than three weeks behind a dSLR):

1) Because controlling DoF is hard on a P&S and easy on my K-x, EVERY PICTURE MUST HAVE A BLURRED BACKGROUND. I have my excuses (my normal settings are cluttered, I mostly shoot portraits, etc), and I hope to grow as a photographer. Nonetheless, see exhibit A.

2) I had (still have!) elevated expectations of my equipment. I overestimated the capability/ease of dSLR's sharpness, sensitivity, and AF. I wanted perfect AF in low light with no flash! I wanted pixel-peeping sharpness from my kit lens! (I still want these things, BTW.) As it turns out, my "entry level" camera requires lots of practice (which I am enjoying greatly!), and now LBA may be setting in...

05-19-2011, 05:45 AM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by Monkey Mash Button Quote
Speaking as a beginner myself (less than three weeks behind a dSLR):

1) Because controlling DoF is hard on a P&S and easy on my K-x, EVERY PICTURE MUST HAVE A BLURRED BACKGROUND. I have my excuses (my normal settings are cluttered, I mostly shoot portraits, etc), and I hope to grow as a photographer. Nonetheless, see exhibit A.

2) I had (still have!) elevated expectations of my equipment. I overestimated the capability/ease of dSLR's sharpness, sensitivity, and AF. I wanted perfect AF in low light with no flash! I wanted pixel-peeping sharpness from my kit lens! (I still want these things, BTW.) As it turns out, my "entry level" camera requires lots of practice (which I am enjoying greatly!), and now LBA may be setting in...

Wow, MMB, you completely read my mind. All I have to say is "Ditto" or +1 or "Scary how much that's me."

(And maybe it's because I'm a beginner, too, but I think your photos in exhibit A are quite nice. )
05-19-2011, 08:17 AM   #33
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Never exploring beyond "Auto" mode.

QuoteOriginally posted by Frogfish Quote
A lot of P&S cameras automatically flash if the camera deduces they need it. No user error involved.
And DSLRs in auto.

I recently went on a field trip with my daughter. DSLRs were the most common cameras carried by parents. Every one of them was in auto.
05-19-2011, 11:52 AM   #34
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- Never using Auto or Scene modes.

- Thinking that good pictures only form thru blood, sweat & full manual control.

- Looking down on people that just like to take nice quality pictures without overthinking it / devoting 95% of their time to 'the art'

Sorry, couldnt resist, I just cant handle the 'manual is must' hipster/snobbish comments surfacing every one in a while.

05-19-2011, 12:07 PM   #35
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Steadying Camera on a Moving Platform

QuoteOriginally posted by twitch Quote
One of the dumbest things I've done is take a whole lot of long exposure shots with my tripod mounted camera. Only problem was I was on a floating wharf, so while my camera was rock solid compared to the wharf, the waves were moving the wharf up and down resulting in dozens of blurry images You only make that kind of mistake once.
This one reminds me of learning to do Aerial work when I was in Army Photo School and later in Vietnam ........ NEVER rest the camera on the aircraft, or any part of it! This is particularly true with helicopters. The vibration from the aircraft itself will result in some unusable shots.
05-19-2011, 02:39 PM   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by hillerby Quote
This one reminds me of learning to do Aerial work when I was in Army Photo School and later in Vietnam ........ NEVER rest the camera on the aircraft, or any part of it! This is particularly true with helicopters. The vibration from the aircraft itself will result in some unusable shots.
As a guy who takes most of photos seated atop a 16 liter diesel engine, I can certainly identify with that. Leaning against the truck is a no-no. Same goes for holding my elbows in against my body. I just have to try for a sort of "free float" and be thankful for SR.
05-19-2011, 03:07 PM   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by basditz Quote
- Never using Auto or Scene modes.

- Thinking that good pictures only form thru blood, sweat & full manual control.

- Looking down on people that just like to take nice quality pictures without overthinking it / devoting 95% of their time to 'the art'

Sorry, couldnt resist, I just cant handle the 'manual is must' hipster/snobbish comments surfacing every one in a while.
There is no looking down nor being "hipster"- (i had to look that one up )/snobbish (you did the name calling, not me) and, if you looked carefully at what I wrote - I said, "Never exploring beyond "Auto" mode." The key word here is never. There is nothing wrong with using a DSLR in auto mode. In fact, when my sister recently purchased a Kr she was a bit intimidated by all the controls and workings of a DSLR. I told her to just use it in Auto and see what it does. However, I also told her to explore beyond auto and learn how to use her camera.

If you're going to get a DSLR and have no intention of exploring beyond auto modes, then, imho, you've wasted your money on an overpriced and big P/S.

So, yes, I believe people should learn how to use their cameras.
05-19-2011, 06:15 PM   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by wasser Quote
There is no looking down nor being "hipster"- (i had to look that one up )/snobbish (you did the name calling, not me) and, if you looked carefully at what I wrote - I said, "Never exploring beyond "Auto" mode."
I don't think his comments were exclusively directed at you, mostly the people just radomly parading the word 'auto' in this thread, I think you were more an unfortunate instigator . But yes it was at the concencus which arrises from time to time that if you ever use auto, or don't always shoot manual on your DSLR you are an unworth yuppie, .


Last edited by crf529; 05-19-2011 at 06:24 PM.
05-19-2011, 10:36 PM   #39
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The problem is if you only use Auto on your DSLR you are unlikely to get results as good as a Bridge or P&S, which are pretty damn excellent nowadays and are in the main designed for that style of shooting. If you want to explore beyond those boundaries then you can get results that those cameras would not be capable of in the best of hands because of their technical limitations.

By all means start off that way to get the feel of your new camera - but stopping there is, well, pointless. There is a time and a place for AV, TAv and full MF - the trick is to learn what they are, which one best suits your style of shooting and subjects and practice them - early results will be poor but by exploration and asking advice on forums like PF you can advance quickly .... and leave those P&Ss in your wake !
05-19-2011, 11:06 PM   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by Frogfish Quote
The problem is if you only use Auto on your DSLR you are unlikely to get results as good as a Bridge or P&S, which are pretty damn excellent nowadays and are in the main designed for that style of shooting. If you want to explore beyond those boundaries then you can get results that those cameras would not be capable of in the best of hands because of their technical limitations.

By all means start off that way to get the feel of your new camera - but stopping there is, well, pointless. There is a time and a place for AV, TAv and full MF - the trick is to learn what they are, which one best suits your style of shooting and subjects and practice them - early results will be poor but by exploration and asking advice on forums like PF you can advance quickly .... and leave those P&Ss in your wake !
No one here said Auto only was a good idea, quite the opposite which I think started this conversation...

Back on topic:

Thinking that at hotshoe flash is not useful because their camera already has a pop up one.

Xyz camera must be better because it has 2 more megapixels.

An 18-250mm lens makes all other lenses in that focal range pointless and is the only one I need on my new $1500 DSLR.

Spending $400 on a tripod alone is silly, my $60 Kmart one is the same thing.
05-20-2011, 01:02 AM   #41
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I think one of the most common beginner's mistakes is to start thinking that one is beyond making beginner's mistakes. . .

A common one is to assume that the AF sensor area is limited to the little red square that lights up in the viewfinder.

Scott
05-20-2011, 01:56 AM   #42
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QuoteOriginally posted by snostorm Quote
I think one of the most common beginner's mistakes is to start thinking that one is beyond making beginner's mistakes. . .

A common one is to assume that the AF sensor area is limited to the little red square that lights up in the viewfinder.

Scott
Ha Ha - quite correct Scott. I frequently forget to reset the WB to current conditions !!
05-20-2011, 01:26 PM   #43
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buying a DSLR when they don't know how to use a normal camera, thinking that expensive cameras give your cool artistic photos.
photoshopping perfect images making them horrible.

i'm not a beginner but i still make mistakes like not checking camera setting (i'm used to work with analog where i don't have to worry about iso, wb and other stuff because i know what film i have in it)

@crf529, an $60 tripod isn't the same as a $400 one. i was thinking the same thing as you but when i had the opportunity to work with a good more costly tripod, i've seen the big difference but it depends on what you're doing, if you need something to hold your camera at eye level, a $60 tripod is good .
05-20-2011, 01:37 PM   #44
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Ok...so don't laugh at me for having made this mistake...maybe no one has, but if anyone has...they need to hear my mistake!

Don't take all your photos at the same focal length! try dif ones on the same subject:

Focal length makes a HUGE difference on the feel and depth of field of a photo. I understood that aperture had a great effect on the DOF, and I figured out that having my lens at the widest angle (18) gave me the lowest aperture (and shallowest DOF I thought), so I almost ALWAYS had it there, just getting really close to my subjects. By chance I had been experimenting with my zoom (like 8 months later...yeah...) and i got just as shallow of a DOF...in fact more so at a much higher aperture. and they were really amazing photos. My best yet...by playing around with my zoom!

Seriously... do an exersise with focal length taking pictures of the same object at different lengths (filling the frame with the object each time) keeping the Av as low as it goes with each to see the different feel of the lengths. All my wide angle lengths look super horrible to me now where as last week I thought they were great.
05-20-2011, 02:12 PM   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by wasser Quote
1. Forgetting to wind the film before opening the back plate.
2. I may not explain this one well, but film users should understand. Winding a foll of film midway so you can switch film type is awesome. Putting that roll back in and forgetting to advance the frame...not so awesome.
Shooting film really meant you had to rely on habits, habits, habits. Avoid bad ones, train good ones.
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