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06-16-2011, 04:25 AM   #1
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Time lapse with KX advice please :)

Hi

Hoping you guys can help me with some time lapse questions. Ignorant newbie here!

I've got the intervalometer set up, so ready to go. I'll be shooting a pastel painting that I'm doing. It will be taken indoors with natural light. I've just got the kit lense.

What is the best image resolution? I've set it to jpeg 10m, will that be ok?

I've been reading previous threads on the subject and setting the white balance seems important, but means nothing to me, so what would be best to set it at? I see there are a lot of choices.

I got totaly lost when reading something about 180 degrees but that seemed important for a smooth result.

I realise the results will probably be pants first time round as I'm working blind, new to the camera and dslr! I can change things to improve things in future as I learn, but i'd like it to be as good as I can for now, so any advice would be great!

Thank you

06-16-2011, 04:38 AM   #2
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The resolution depends on what you are going to do with it.

1080p (HDTV) is 1920 x 1080 pixels, which is a smidgen over 2 megapixels, so 10mp will be more than adequate if you are going to use the images to make a movie.

If you want to print some of them as stills you might want to stick with 10, but otherwise you will probably want to resize to 1920 * 1080 anyway, whatever size the orginals, so you might as well shoot as close to that you can.

The white balance is to do with the temperature of the light, which as a painter you will know all about - light is 'cool' (blue) in the morning and 'warm' (red/orange) in the evening. Your camera will try and adjust to make things it thinks are white look white regardless of this - sometimes it gets it right, sometimes it doesn't. I'd suggest you set the white balance manually so it is consistent across your images. What you set it at depends on the light in your room. Experiment. Instructions on how to do it will be in the manual, but it's quite easy. I'd suggest taking a picture of a sheet of paper in mid-day light and adjust the WB so it is white, then sticking with that.
06-16-2011, 09:41 AM   #3
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Thank you NS. That is really helpful I'll deffinately drop the res to 2mp as I don't need still shots from this project.

I'm still a bit nervous of the white balance so I might leave that on auto this time! Obviously it's something I need to learn about and experiment with so I can improve, but your explination has helped me understand it which is a good start!
06-16-2011, 10:06 AM   #4
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I'm just about to leave work, but 2mp might be a tiny bit too low for 1080p - I'll check later.

In the meantime, this might give you a better idea on how to set the WB on your K-x if you fancy an experiment.

Setting white balance on the Pentax K-x | kxuser.com

06-16-2011, 12:52 PM   #5
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You're a star, thank you
06-16-2011, 10:23 PM   #6
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Any Auto setting can be a source of inconsistency, because the camera makes new choices for every shot. White balance is just one. Focus, exposure and depth of field are also important.

Depending on the intervalometer, the camera might not be set up to auto-focus for each shot. I would eliminate that as a variable by setting focus once and switching the camera to manual focus mode (the switch on the front of the camera). Take a test shot to verify that it's in focus. (Then I usually kick the tripod and have to repeat this step.) It's unusual to ever want focus to change.

You might want the camera to recalculate exposure every time, or not. If light levels vary dramatically through the period, setting one exposure will enhance the change, while leaving the camera in an auto mode will minimize it. If light levels should be reasonably constant, setting exposure manually reduces the chance of one or two odd frames. For an Auto exposure, I would use Av, aperture priority mode. That keeps the aperture constant, so the depth of field doesn't change. A test shot should tell you if you need exposure compensation. For a fixed exposure, take a test shot in any mode you like, see if it looks right, then switch to M mode and set the camera to
those settings.

Unless the light is really variable, setting ISO to one value is more consistent too.

I take everything at maximum resolution and RAW, unless you need 10 frames a second. It's easier to throw away pixels in processing. Photoshop CS5 makes it extremely easy to adjust a group of photos to have the same white balance or many other settings.
06-17-2011, 05:07 AM   #7
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Thanks for all the advice Dave

Lots to chew over here!

I hadn't thought of the auto focusing! As my hand will be in and out of the frames if it's on auto it may well refocus on my hand rather than the painting, so I will most deffinately fix that setting. Major mistake avoided there!

Hopefully I'll get going on this this afternoon.
06-17-2011, 06:06 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Just1MoreDave Quote
Any Auto setting can be a source of inconsistency, because the camera makes new choices for every shot. White balance is just one. Focus, exposure and depth of field are also important.

Depending on the intervalometer, the camera might not be set up to auto-focus for each shot. I would eliminate that as a variable by setting focus once and switching the camera to manual focus mode (the switch on the front of the camera). Take a test shot to verify that it's in focus. (Then I usually kick the tripod and have to repeat this step.) It's unusual to ever want focus to change.

You might want the camera to recalculate exposure every time, or not. If light levels vary dramatically through the period, setting one exposure will enhance the change, while leaving the camera in an auto mode will minimize it. If light levels should be reasonably constant, setting exposure manually reduces the chance of one or two odd frames. For an Auto exposure, I would use Av, aperture priority mode. That keeps the aperture constant, so the depth of field doesn't change. A test shot should tell you if you need exposure compensation. For a fixed exposure, take a test shot in any mode you like, see if it looks right, then switch to M mode and set the camera to
those settings.

Unless the light is really variable, setting ISO to one value is more consistent too.

I take everything at maximum resolution and RAW, unless you need 10 frames a second. It's easier to throw away pixels in processing. Photoshop CS5 makes it extremely easy to adjust a group of photos to have the same white balance or many other settings.
+1

And I'd suggest non-automatic white balance unless you expect the color of the illumination to change as you progress with the painting.

06-22-2011, 03:51 AM   #9
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Well I have a result of sorts!

OK, I know it's pants!!!!

I think the only things I got right was having the camera on the tripod and the 10 second shooting interval LOL!

I've got a lot to improve on, but the first thing I need to sort out is the programme for editing the film. I was using Microsoft Movie Maker. Unfortunately it kept freezing as it couldn't cope with the 1500 high res images I was trying to work with. Eventually I got it done but then it couldn't cope with saving it above 10M. So although I took high res pics (8GB in total!) I had to drastically reduce this for the finished clip.

So the next question is what software programme do you use/recommend for making the movies?

Thanks

Last edited by 2cay2; 06-22-2011 at 03:58 AM.
06-22-2011, 04:35 AM   #10
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Nice work! Thanks for sharing.

For video editing, I use Pinnacle Studio 12 and Roxio 2010. Sounds like your computer was having a hard time dealing with editing. Between the two I mentioned, Roxio is easier on the computer. But again, for 1500 hi rez images, you are going to make that PC work, no matter what .
06-22-2011, 06:31 AM   #11
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Thanks Agsy

My desk top PC should be able to cope but it got sick a while back and existing programmes were effected. I actually finished the clip on my little netbook! Same programme but it managed it somehow!
Off to look at your suggestions now, cheers
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