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08-12-2011, 11:08 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by twitch Quote
If you blow on the sensor with your mouth, just be sure to eat a whole bag of potato crisps first.
Lime-pepper flavored. After the jar of peanut butter.

That's why the camera throat is pointed down when using the blower...

08-12-2011, 11:49 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by rhodopsin Quote
Lime-pepper flavored. After the jar of peanut butter.

That's why the camera throat is pointed down when using the blower...
A must do when eating crisps and good thinking if you want to blow off dust.
But in the case of dust my hunch would be with a decent blow the fluff, if it does come off, will go anywhere inside the mirror chamber and most likely will not fall out. There are too many surfaces inside the mirror box where the fluff, carried by a fair amount of air flow, can/will get stuck. That is my view.

Greetings

In case people wonder what the Rookery is? It's a beautiful old Building.

Last edited by Schraubstock; 10-31-2011 at 07:14 AM.
08-12-2011, 11:57 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by twitch Quote
If you blow on the sensor with your mouth, just be sure to eat a whole bag of potato crisps first.
Chances are there will be a some people willing to follow this advice

Greetings
08-13-2011, 03:04 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by JeffJS Quote
Just about everything about this is asking for trouble. Especially the highlighted portion. Just get the blower and in the meantime, clone it out.
I agree with others, you can exhale without spraying. I've travelled a lot and not always have had a rocket blower at hand. My K10D needed cleaning now and then. Mouth blowing has done the job for me a number of times.

QuoteOriginally posted by pentaxus Quote
Bymy's makeup brush scenario is probably similar to a sensor brush that is sold by micro-tools.com. I would have a make-up brush that is dedicated to sensor cleaning of get the micro-tools one. Sometimes you get a piece of dust that just doesn't want to blow off and the brush will take care of it without having to use a sensor swab. Of course you should always use a blower instead of blowing with your mouth.
The advantages of a makeup brush are: price and availability. See below.

QuoteOriginally posted by Schraubstock Quote
Actually I am not a fan of these blowers. It has also be known that the rubber of some blowers start to deteriorate over time and particles of rubber when you blow find themselves deposited on the sensor. (A really serious problem).
Two more things:
1) I like to add to Schraubstock's experience that my newly bought Giotto's blower sprayed rubber particles on my K10D sensor when it came new out of the plastic wrapper. The rubber solvent was not completely gone. So, there I was with my new rocket blower and rubber particles on my sensor that needed wet swiping to get off. So, what is better? Rocket blower or mouth? Risks are everywhere.

2) I feel that many of us are too nervous on this subject. The only true problem that cannot be reversed is scratching the AA filter surface. Therefore, be relaxed with all other cleaning actions. Just make sure that if you clean with items that touch the filter surface (swipes, brushes, etc) that you know for sure that there are no sand or other sharp particles on the sensor.
Therefore, what I do is:
- Blow (anyway you can)
- Brush (if still needed), before brushing inspect the surface!
- Swipe (if still needed), before swiping inspect the surface.

So far I've only spend 2 of my set of 5 wet swipes over that last 4 years with 3 DSLR's.

Bert

08-13-2011, 08:22 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by bymy141 Quote
I agree with others, you can exhale without spraying. I've travelled a lot and not always have had a rocket blower at hand. My K10D needed cleaning now and then. Mouth blowing has done the job for me a number of times.



Bert
In order to remove Some dust, you need a lot more than a simple 'exhale'. As I said in my Other post, if it works for you, use it. I personally don't recommend it. I'm sure the sensor swab people will be happy to sell you the swabs after you spit on your sensor.

08-16-2011, 08:02 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by SpecialK Quote
In a post sometime ago, someone suggested blowing into the camera, and others said it was impossible without spitting. It got heated...Oy... I am of the type who can exhale without spitting, but I do not use it as a sensor cleaning method.
I think most of uscanblow with any visible-to-the-eye particles coming out most of the time. But there may still sometimes be smaller particles. Not everysingle time, so youmight get away with sometimes, but run a controlled test -say, 100 trials - and I suspect you'd see the difference. Plus, there is no one alive whose exhaled air isn't rather more humid than the surrounding air. And moisture condenses.

So as an an occasional emergency method, sure, chances are pretty good it will work most of he time if you're sufficiently careful. But there's no way it's going to be as safe long term.
08-16-2011, 08:07 AM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by Schraubstock Quote
Actually I am not a fan of these blowers. Firstly, they don't reliably remove the dust and secondly if they do they just re-locate it somewhere else into the mirror box when it will re-appear again on your sensor the following week by virtue of turbulence created by the mirror slap and and pumping zoom lenses.
And yet, just like a hummingbird' wings, they somehow do actually work.



QuoteQuote:
It only needs to happen once but it will put you off using these little buggers for life.
Or, one could simply take the common senseprecaution of blowing the thing out a few times before each use.

Again, despite what people who don't use them might like to believe, they really do work.
08-16-2011, 09:26 AM   #23
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Another thing to do is to run the sensor clean vibrator with the lens off, and the mount facing downward. By the way, I have and use a blower regularly. I just retired my 30 year old one in favour of the Giotto Rocket blower. Junk inside is not a problem - just blow it a few times before you point it at the sensor. Works for me. My four year old K10 is clean.

08-17-2011, 12:36 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Marc Sabatella Quote
they somehow do actually work.
Hi
from they way you phrase your retort, "...somehow do..." I deduce that the physics of how hummingbirds actually stay aloft is somewhat of a mystery to you. The physics of that is generally well understood.

I can now see why the prospect of the aforementioned likelihood of a piece of fluff not falling out of a down pointed camera mount opening after it has been dislodged from the sensor by a blast of air is something that is not generally understood. Sure these blowers work sometimes but what happens to the fluff? If the fluff got removed successfully that's all that matters -is it? Is it a case of "out of sight - out of mind?" Well perhaps for the moment, but I bet it'll be back.

Permit me the liberty to explain.

When you attempt to shift a piece of matter which is stuck on a sensor with a blast of air the force (strength) of it not only has to be strong enough to carry the weight of this matter but also it has to be strong enough to overcome/break the bond that holds the matter onto the sensor surface. This suggests that a pretty strong force of air velocity is required.

Now if with one strong puff of the blaster you are successful in dislodging the offending matter and it gets successfully carried away from the sensor, any subsequent puff of air following in quick succession (people customary do 4-5 quick blasts) will not allow this matter to find its way down through the camera opening for the simple reason that the piece of fluff you have just removed will not be heavy enough or has propulsion of its own to overcome the force of air coming towards it. Also please consider the turbulence you have created in this confined space.

The most likely result will be that, whatever you have removed from the sensor, will be carried to some far corner of the mirror chamber and in all likelihood will attach itself anew on some surface. But if it is still free floating inside the chamber it will not be in front of the mount opening because this is the direction from where the blast of air originated. And if it still floats around somewhere inside the chamber I can't see that the fluff will do a u-turn and head for the opening. My understanding of physics is telling me, all you do is re-locate the dirt and it can attach itself onto the sensor again. So my preferred method of dirt removal would be "removal."

So, if blowers remove dirt only temporarily then I say they actually do not work.

Greetings
08-17-2011, 01:37 AM - 1 Like   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by Schraubstock Quote
Hi
from they way you phrase your retort, "...somehow do..." I deduce that the physics of how hummingbirds actually stay aloft is somewhat of a mystery to you. The physics of that is generally well understood.

I can now see why the prospect of the aforementioned likelihood of a piece of fluff not falling out of a down pointed camera mount opening after it has been dislodged from the sensor by a blast of air is something that is not generally understood. Sure these blowers work sometimes but what happens to the fluff? If the fluff got removed successfully that's all that matters -is it? Is it a case of "out of sight - out of mind?" Well perhaps for the moment, but I bet it'll be back.

Permit me the liberty to explain.

When you attempt to shift a piece of matter which is stuck on a sensor with a blast of air the force (strength) of it not only has to be strong enough to carry the weight of this matter but also it has to be strong enough to overcome/break the bond that holds the matter onto the sensor surface. This suggests that a pretty strong force of air velocity is required.

Now if with one strong puff of the blaster you are successful in dislodging the offending matter and it gets successfully carried away from the sensor, any subsequent puff of air following in quick succession (people customary do 4-5 quick blasts) will not allow this matter to find its way down through the camera opening for the simple reason that the piece of fluff you have just removed will not be heavy enough or has propulsion of its own to overcome the force of air coming towards it. Also please consider the turbulence you have created in this confined space.

The most likely result will be that, whatever you have removed from the sensor, will be carried to some far corner of the mirror chamber and in all likelihood will attach itself anew on some surface. But if it is still free floating inside the chamber it will not be in front of the mount opening because this is the direction from where the blast of air originated. And if it still floats around somewhere inside the chamber I can't see that the fluff will do a u-turn and head for the opening. My understanding of physics is telling me, all you do is re-locate the dirt and it can attach itself onto the sensor again. So my preferred method of dirt removal would be "removal."

So, if blowers remove dirt only temporarily then I say they actually do not work.

Greetings
In my experience blowers remove the dirt an dust permanently. I had heck of time with used camera getting sensor and chamber cleared of dust, but once I did, both have remained clear and free of dust using only occasional blowing, for the past three years. No wet cleaning necessary. And I change lenses frequently, often in dusty conditions (outdoors).
08-17-2011, 01:37 PM   #26
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A while back I saw a miniscule insect through my viewfinder. It was walking somewhere inside the camera. A blower did not dislodge it but eventually it disappeared - must have died. BUT - i wonder if it's body is still lurking somewhere ready to attach itself to the sensor!!!!

It was most disturbing to see it through the viewfinder.

Cheers...John
08-17-2011, 04:38 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by Kenty1 Quote
A while back I saw a miniscule insect through my viewfinder. It was walking somewhere inside the camera. A blower did not dislodge it but eventually it disappeared - must have died. BUT - i wonder if it's body is still lurking somewhere ready to attach itself to the sensor!!!!

It was most disturbing to see it through the viewfinder.

Cheers...John
Hi
If it was a PENTAX it was buggy software for sure

Greetings
08-18-2011, 02:32 AM   #28
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Yup - a new type of Pentax Bug!!
08-18-2011, 08:16 AM   #29
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Interesting discussion I sparked up here !

Cheers again for the help though, glad to know what the streak is being caused by. That's the risk buying used though - I only hope it's not a pube . . .
08-18-2011, 11:13 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by redspecial Quote
Interesting discussion I sparked up here !

Cheers again for the help though, glad to know what the streak is being caused by. That's the risk buying used though - I only hope it's not a pube . . .


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