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10-08-2011, 11:44 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by ScreamingIdiot Quote
80-200mm - Descent hand-hold wildlife / outdoor lense. Longest lense can be used without a tripod (my experience)
75-300mm - Requires tripod or Monopod at high magnification
Why both lenses? The 75-300 overlaps both ends of the 80-200. Is the 80-200 substantially faster? If it is go with that one, but not both.

10-09-2011, 07:22 AM   #17
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A manual 50mm lens f2 or faster would be a great learning tool for a student.
Jake
10-09-2011, 07:56 AM   #18
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The reason I keep both an 80-200 and the 75-300 is because the 200 can be used without a tripod while the 300 cannot. This makes the 200 better for me on nature walks, while the 300 would be a pain in the butt to use that way.
10-09-2011, 08:03 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by ScreamingIdiot Quote
The reason I keep both an 80-200 and the 75-300 is because the 200 can be used without a tripod while the 300 cannot. This makes the 200 better for me on nature walks, while the 300 would be a pain in the butt to use that way.
Why can't you use the 300 without a tripod? They are zoom lenses, you don't have to always use the 75-300 at 300.

10-09-2011, 05:59 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by ScreamingIdiot Quote
I've had my eye on a DA35mm. If I can ask, whats the application for that bad boy?
The 35 is going to give you an equivalent of a 53mm in a regular slr. Its a fast lens that will isolate an object for you. In addition to that it is very sharp for the price. Its also good for street photography. As well as for landscape to some degree.
10-09-2011, 08:05 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by ScreamingIdiot Quote
The reason I keep both an 80-200 and the 75-300 is because the 200 can be used without a tripod while the 300 cannot. This makes the 200 better for me on nature walks, while the 300 would be a pain in the butt to use that way.
The reason why you are able to use the 80-200 with out the tripod is the focal length and not the lens itself. Take the 75-300 and set it to the 200mm focal length mark and you should be able to use this lens hand held too - take it for a test spin and try it out. The K2000 has image stabilized sensor, so you should be fine.

I would sell off the 80-200 and keep the 75-300. The 75-300 is not the best zoom but it can do a good job, especially stopped down some. You should also be able to use the 75-300 in the 85 to 100 range as a portrait lens. It would not be the sharpest, but on portraits you really don't want razor sharp images anyway (clients hate to see every blemish and wrinkle).

The other two zooms, if you keep the Kit 18-55 can go and be replaced with primes, as Rico and other have indicated. You can look on ebay and craigslist for old film cameras with a 50mm f1.7 or f2 lens for no more than $50 say.

You can also go to KEH.com for lenses.

I have read (but not tried) that their BGN (bargin) or UG (ugly) conditions are actually very good. They grade using a collectors condition guide. For students on a budget its probably a very good buy. Plus, you can call them and tell them what you are looking for. They might be able to pull the lens and tell you what the glass looks like. A ugly body with clear glass is what you really want on a student's budget. Also, the Market place here on the Forum.


Last edited by interested_observer; 10-09-2011 at 08:13 PM.
10-10-2011, 04:42 PM   #22
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Thanks for all the suggestions... so so far the concesus is to ditch my 80-200... OK. I also need a flash and a 50mm prime.
10-10-2011, 05:30 PM   #23
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for flash, check out the yongnuo flashes. they're cheap and powerful manual flashes that work especially well for off camera work

10-11-2011, 12:50 AM   #24
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Have you been told you need a flash? I remembered you are a photography student, doesn't your college (or whatever) issue a 'kit list' of some sort?
10-11-2011, 04:57 AM   #25
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Instructor did tell me last week we needed one. I can check one out from the Photography dept. but I would rather have my own.
10-11-2011, 05:34 AM   #26
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I'd agree with the need for a fast 50, I barely took mine off my camera for the first few months I had it and it's still the lens I use the most. Really surprises photographer friends of mine that I can shoot in dark clubs and pubs without flash and a fairly low iso and still get good shots. Someone else recommended the Yongnuo flashes; I bought a 560 a month or so ago and so far it's been working well for me. No auto on it, but I pretty much only use old manual lenses (too poor for anything else) so that's not a problem. Really nice to have the control over output it gives, and the very fast refresh time is good too. I can fill the buffer on my kx with hi-speed burst and the flash synchronises perfectly with every shot.
10-11-2011, 12:15 PM   #27
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I'd start by borrowing a flash rather than buying. You might find they have some rather nice kit. At the very least you will start to get a bit of a feel for what suits your style. Of course it might not suit your pocket!
10-11-2011, 04:41 PM   #28
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When I was in college in 1981, the school used the Pentax K1000. The had the 40 mm f 2.8 pancake lens as the standard lens. The school lens other then the 40 mm was the 28 mm and 135 mm lends. They had a mix of k-mount and m42 screw mount types with K mount adapters. They also had the 50 mm and 100 mm macro lens that could be signed out.

Today I use a mix of mixed and zoom lens types. In the fixed lens, I have the 28 mm f2.8 M-series, the 50 mm F1.4 F-series prime, the 50 mm f4 macro lens and the non-auto extention tube set, the 100 mm f2.8 M-series lens, the 200 mm f4, and a Tokina 500 mm mirror lens. The zooms include the 18 to 55 mm kit lens from the K-m, a 28 to 80 mm F-series from the SF-10 I bought years ago, and a Albinar 75 to 300 mm that came from a used ME-Super kit sale. I as have an older style slide copier that makes quick work of copying my older slides and mounted B&W film into the digital age.

Using prime lens is a great way learn the basics of picture taking. The 50 mm lens is a must in my eyes to get the basics out of the way.

Ask the instructor want he feels you need to start up the course and then add some optional stuff you may like to use money permitting. Start looking at the flash units listed on this sites equipment section to see how they rate and what you can afford. I would go with the best bang for the buck by looking at the most powerfull one you can get at the best price. Buying a cheap low powered unit is really a waste of money.
10-11-2011, 07:01 PM   #29
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Personally...

Keep the 18-55mm
Ditch the rest...
Buy a fast 50mm prime
Buy a prime between 24mm and 35mm (Pentax-M-28mm or Sigma 24mm or DA-L35mm 2.4...)
Get a 135mm 2.8 for a couple quid on fleabay...
Get a new but cheap manual flash (Yongnuo YN560 or Vivitar 285hv) a stand, brolly and trigger set...

The other thing I'd deffo get... (I don't think has been mentioned) is circular polorising filters for those lenses you'll use for landscape work...

Maybe a couple ND's (cokin ND4 and ND8) to slow things down...

All the best
10-11-2011, 08:45 PM   #30
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RE: the last post--if you decide to get a polarizer, I suggest you save your money and get a used linear polarizer--for 49mm or 52mm if that covers most of the lenses. The few times you use it you can do manual focus. Also maybe the school has some of this to try. Odds and ends can really add up in dollars.
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