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10-24-2011, 12:33 AM   #1
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how to get this vignette effect?

Hi everyone! I am a beginner photographer using a pentax SF-1 with a SMC Pentax-F Zoom 35-70 mm lens. I recently got some pictures developed and I noticed in one of the pictures it had vignetting. Heres the picture:


I really like this effect and would like to utilize it occasionally, but I have no idea how I actually achieved it. So my question is, does anyone know what kind of settings I would need to set my camera to or what to do with my lens to recreate this effect? Thanks in advance!

10-24-2011, 12:49 AM   #2
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If you're not shooting digital it might be a pain to consistently recreate something like this, but there are lots of things that can cause this much vignetting:
-stacked filters
-wrong/special lens hood
-an issue with the lens

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10-24-2011, 01:12 AM   #3
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Your lens hood was probably too long for the focal length. What lens were you using on what camera body?
10-24-2011, 02:44 PM   #4
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A sure way to reproduce this is to use a threaded hood that's a size or two too small for your lens, mounted on one or two step down rings. With a lens like the kit 18-55 you can reliably cause this kind of vignetting below about 35mm this way. It's really pronounced, excessive even, at the 18mm end. That's using a 49mm hood with a 52-49mm step down ring.

However, for digital, it's far better imo to do this in software. ACR has options for it, and can produce some nice, subtler effects.

10-24-2011, 04:04 PM   #5
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For an even more pronounced effect: Get some cheap worthless 52mm UV filter. Break out the glass. Tape a cardboard paper-towel or toilet-paper tube around the outside of the filter ring. Screw this onto the lens. Great vignetting! To really get rad: Remove the tube. Cut out a cardboard disc that fits inside the ring. Cut a rectangular hole inside that disc; for a more Holga-like effect, make it a square hole. Stick disc inside ring, screw onto lens, and you're hip!
10-27-2011, 03:54 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
If you're not shooting digital it might be a pain to consistently recreate something like this, but there are lots of things that can cause this much vignetting:
-stacked filters
-wrong/special lens hood
-an issue with the lens
thats weird because im pretty sure none of those are the reason why. because I've taken pictures using about like 5 rolls of film which is well over 100 shots..and out of those shots only 3 had the vignetting

QuoteOriginally posted by Bruce Quote
Your lens hood was probably too long for the focal length. What lens were you using on what camera body?
pentax SF-1 with a SMC Pentax-F Zoom 35-70 mm lens


QuoteOriginally posted by Philoslothical Quote
A sure way to reproduce this is to use a threaded hood that's a size or two too small for your lens, mounted on one or two step down rings. With a lens like the kit 18-55 you can reliably cause this kind of vignetting below about 35mm this way. It's really pronounced, excessive even, at the 18mm end. That's using a 49mm hood with a 52-49mm step down ring.

However, for digital, it's far better imo to do this in software. ACR has options for it, and can produce some nice, subtler effects.
well i dont really plan on spending money right now on camera accessories (struggling college student), and im curious to see how using software to recreate it would look on my film pictures..and by ACR do you mean adobe camera raw?


QuoteOriginally posted by RioRico Quote
For an even more pronounced effect: Get some cheap worthless 52mm UV filter. Break out the glass. Tape a cardboard paper-towel or toilet-paper tube around the outside of the filter ring. Screw this onto the lens. Great vignetting! To really get rad: Remove the tube. Cut out a cardboard disc that fits inside the ring. Cut a rectangular hole inside that disc; for a more Holga-like effect, make it a square hole. Stick disc inside ring, screw onto lens, and you're hip!
i might actually try this. thanks a lot!!!
10-27-2011, 06:24 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by ajyp Quote
i might actually try this. thanks a lot!!!
It sounds like a snide joke, but I've actually done the latter, or a variant thereof. I cut a square hole in a piece of cardboard and taped it down on a fixed-lens P&S for the Holga effect. And it worked, fuzzy edges and diffraction and light-leaks (when aimed into lights) and everything! Another vignetting gimmick would be to take a worthless UV filter and paint a black stripe around its diameter, or just use a magic marker. But playing with cardboard is real cheap and easy. Have fun!
10-27-2011, 08:22 PM   #8
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I wonder if it was something done by poor film processing. That lens and camera combination was very common, yet I've never heard about vignetting until this post. Of course on a DSLR you wouldn't see it. You could maybe look for dark corners in the viewfinder, probably at 35mm. The SF1 viewfinder shows 92% of the frame, which should be enough to see part of the vignetting.

10-30-2011, 05:03 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by RioRico Quote
It sounds like a snide joke, but I've actually done the latter, or a variant thereof. I cut a square hole in a piece of cardboard and taped it down on a fixed-lens P&S for the Holga effect. And it worked, fuzzy edges and diffraction and light-leaks (when aimed into lights) and everything! Another vignetting gimmick would be to take a worthless UV filter and paint a black stripe around its diameter, or just use a magic marker. But playing with cardboard is real cheap and easy. Have fun!
oh im sorry i didnt mean to sound snide at all...i actually am very interested in your method because i am a poor college student and im not really looking into purchasing anything as of now. im a dyi kind of guy so stuff like that really interests me. i really appreciate your feedback
10-30-2011, 05:08 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Just1MoreDave Quote
I wonder if it was something done by poor film processing. That lens and camera combination was very common, yet I've never heard about vignetting until this post. Of course on a DSLR you wouldn't see it. You could maybe look for dark corners in the viewfinder, probably at 35mm. The SF1 viewfinder shows 92% of the frame, which should be enough to see part of the vignetting.
i dunno if its poor film processing because wouldnt all of my pictures from my film roll end up like that? but in this case only two pictures from my roll had it.

im trying to look for dark corners in my viewfinder and i really cant tell..but then again, if it happened to have dark corners, i would ask my self the same question as to why my other pictures dont have it.
10-30-2011, 05:37 PM   #11
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What about a tulip hood 90degrees out of alignment
10-30-2011, 07:14 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by ajyp Quote
oh im sorry i didnt mean to sound snide at all...
Oh no, you weren't being snide, *I* was being snide, while trying not to be. Or whatever. It's my fault. Don't sweat it.

QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
What about a tulip hood 90degrees out of alignment
That's so simple! Sure, at wider FLs, that would work just fine. As long as it doesn't fall off whilst shooting down into an alligator pit. I hate when that happens.
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