Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
11-03-2011, 07:45 PM   #1
Senior Member




Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: connecticut
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 248
infrared

is it difficult to convert a dslr into an infrared camera?

11-03-2011, 07:57 PM   #2
Loyal Site Supporter
blackcloudbrew's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cotati, California USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,782
While I've read that it's possible to DIY it, it's not something I'd want to tackle. There are places to get it done. I've had my k100ds converted for about $350 or so.
11-04-2011, 06:25 AM   #3
Senior Member




Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: connecticut
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 248
Original Poster
thanks, i'll think about this, are there infrared filters for lenses that would do similar?
11-04-2011, 06:36 AM   #4
Loyal Site Supporter
eddie1960's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Toronto
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 12,168
most sensors filter out the infra red spectrum. part of the conversion is removing this filter and then replacing it with an IR filter (like the one you would screw on your lens for a film camera that filters everything below a specific wavelength. You can attach an IR filter to your lens and shoot and will have some (limited) success as generally sensors filters don't remove all ir (just use a weak ir filter like 720nm). of course you can't see a damn thing after attaching the filter and exposures get quite long so you need to compose and focus before attaching the filter (ie end up using a tripod)
one of the huge benefits to digital ir is when you send the camera off if you send it with your most likely to use lens the shop will calibrate your focus for IR as well (it is slightly different than normal light look at an old lens the red mark is for the ir offset focus then adjust to the ir mark)
the other big benefit is you can shoot just like a non ir camera frame compose focus shoot. way easier

I've seen diy instructions but wouldn't tackle it myself unless i had a body i could afford to throw out if i screwed up and damaged the sensor.

11-04-2011, 07:04 AM   #5
Inactive Account




Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ames, Iowa, USA
Photos: Albums
Posts: 2,965
A typical sensor has a "hot mirror" directly in front of the actual sensor; this serves as a filter to reject IR wavelengths & must be removed.

A DSLR requires the hot mirror be replaced by a filter that passes only IR or a plain glass filter - this is necessary to maintain focus calibration.

A P & S camera does not require replacing the hot mirror (its focus mechanism differs from a DSLR) so converting a P&S camera to broadband is easy - just remove the hot mirror and add whatever filter you want in front of the lens; UV, VIS, IR, whatever.

I did this with a Fujifilm F20 - it was easy and worked well.
11-05-2011, 07:11 AM   #6
Forum Member




Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 71
I was tempted to do this to a fixed focus, ahem focus free, camera. Much simpler design. I just haven't found one that I liked.
11-05-2011, 07:14 AM   #7
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Texas
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,116
The Leica M8 was overly sensitive to IR so that it needed an IR cut filter on the lens as well. As a result some have adapted it to IR use and gotten excellent results.
11-05-2011, 08:19 AM   #8
Senior Member




Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: connecticut
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 248
Original Poster
well, i gotta do more research on this, i guess. i see a lot of nice photos that say they are infrared, but not sure if they are cameras that have been adapted, or what. who would i send , say a k10d to , to have the infrared stuff done for me?

11-05-2011, 10:29 AM   #9
Inactive Account




Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ames, Iowa, USA
Photos: Albums
Posts: 2,965
Just an IR filter like a Hoya R72 is all you need if you can handle long exposures - like 8 sec. Hot mirror surgery is needed if you want short exposures.
11-12-2011, 09:39 PM   #10
Senior Member
average-guy's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Idaho
Posts: 102
The IR cut filter(hot mirror) strength varies between cameras. Many older digital cameras tend to have weaker cut filters. I do IR with a Pentax IstDL2 with a 760nm filter and my exposure times are generally under 1 second, my average is about 1/2 second but, it may be as long as 2 seconds on a cloudy day. With average exposure times under 1 second, I never thought seriously about getting mine converted to dedicated IR. There was a list I ran across about a year ago that lists digital cameras by the strength of their IR cut filter (can't find it now). The Pentax ist series of digital camera ranked as having a weak IR cut filter, that's what gave me the incentive to try it without modifying mine, and it's worked well. I'd post some example pic's but I'm away from home on my laptop, all my IR pic's are on the home pc. If you want to experiment without modding a newer camera, it may be worth doing a little research and find an older digital camera with a weak cut filter, and purchasing that model. My istDL2 cost me $60, it needed a minor repair and it was ready to go. Good luck
11-13-2011, 01:15 PM   #11
Senior Member




Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: connecticut
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 248
Original Poster
i guess that is an idea, to get an ist d and use a filter, but did you mean 760mm as explained above ? i don't understand.
thanks
11-13-2011, 04:34 PM   #12
Site Supporter
Ex Finn.'s Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Southern Maryland.
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 6,065
QuoteOriginally posted by newarts Quote
Just an IR filter like a Hoya R72 is all you need
I have it and works great with K100D. Just read the fine print.... it is made by Tokina. . Oh well.
11-13-2011, 06:57 PM   #13
Senior Member
average-guy's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Idaho
Posts: 102
Yes, the filter referenced above (Hoya R72) is a 720nm filter, I use a 760. They are reasonably close as far as IR filters are concerned. The number (720, 760, etc.) is the visible light cutoff point in nanometers (measure of light wavelenth), the filter will block most visible light below this point. I would recommend you do a google search on "infrared photography", there are a lot of helpful and informative websites out there. That's how I got started.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, pentax help, photography
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
K-5 and Infrared fs999 Pentax K-5 13 05-13-2011 05:43 PM
Landscape Infrared Kranky Post Your Photos! 3 09-22-2010 05:53 AM
K-x and Infrared cmknight Pentax DSLR Discussion 4 07-20-2010 06:49 PM
Near Infrared LitoNazareno Welcomes and Introductions 5 04-21-2010 10:25 PM
Misc Three in infrared xs400 Post Your Photos! 8 02-14-2010 09:18 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:34 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top