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12-10-2011, 10:03 AM   #1
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Tourist monument shooting

Ah yes, a typical tourist will shoot a friend right directly in front of the a really tall monument and in the picture, the person looks like an ant. Well, unfortunately I have the problem as well. Is there a way to make it so that you can see the person as well as the structure of interest without using a shrink ray of course

I've seen examples on the internet where the monument is far in the background, but sometimes the buildings cannot be seen from a far distance because either it is covered by trees or other taller buildings.

12-10-2011, 10:15 AM   #2
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Your first choice will be to keep your friend outside of the frame and concetrate on the momument

If that's not possible, then use a wide angle lens and get closer to your friend. The perspective will change and the foreground (your friend) will be proportionally larger than the background. Depending on the focal lenght and the distance you can even turn your friend into a giant.
12-10-2011, 10:29 AM   #3
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Photoshop can also be effective in achieving this effect.
12-10-2011, 11:45 AM - 1 Like   #4
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It's called perspective, and it's controlled entirely by distances, the distances from the camera to the subject (person) to the background (monument). There are various ways to handle it. All involve placing the subject and background in the right position relative to the camera+lens.

* Close distance: Your friend is standing close to the monument. As demp10 suggested, use a wide lens; get close enough to your friend that they loom large in your viewfinder, while the monument is shrunk by the optics.

* Medium distance: Your friend is far enough from the monuments, and you're far enough from your friend, that to your naked eye they seem about the same size. Use a 'normal' lens for least distortion.

* Far distance: Your friend is far enough away from the monument that it looks 1/2 their size or smaller to your naked eye. Use a telephoto lens and stand far enough from your friend that the monument is magnified a bit by the optics.

* Different distances, different shots: As jatrax suggested, shoop a couple pictures together. I read that Japanese photobooths have selections of projected backgrounds of famous sites so you can be placed anywhere. Snap pix of your friend with plain backgrounds, and merge them with your shots of monuments etc.

Out of curiosity: Which monument(s) did you have in mind?

12-10-2011, 01:04 PM   #5
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Well, we just got back from Washington DC. Just wanted a few pointers before my next trip
12-10-2011, 03:39 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by jatrax Quote
Photoshop can also be effective in achieving this effect.
With photoshop you and your friend can save money since you don't even have to visit the monument...but how fun is that?
12-10-2011, 07:50 PM - 2 Likes   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by RioRico Quote
It's called perspective, and it's controlled entirely by distances, the distances from the camera to the subject (person) to the background (monument). There are various ways to handle it. All involve placing the subject and background in the right position relative to the camera+lens.

* Close distance: Your friend is standing close to the monument. As demp10 suggested, use a wide lens; get close enough to your friend that they loom large in your viewfinder, while the monument is shrunk by the optics.

* Medium distance: Your friend is far enough from the monuments, and you're far enough from your friend, that to your naked eye they seem about the same size. Use a 'normal' lens for least distortion.

* Far distance: Your friend is far enough away from the monument that it looks 1/2 their size or smaller to your naked eye. Use a telephoto lens and stand far enough from your friend that the monument is magnified a bit by the optics.

* Different distances, different shots: As jatrax suggested, shoop a couple pictures together. I read that Japanese photobooths have selections of projected backgrounds of famous sites so you can be placed anywhere. Snap pix of your friend with plain backgrounds, and merge them with your shots of monuments etc.

Out of curiosity: Which monument(s) did you have in mind?
Well stated. Here is a graphic illustrating half the principle.

12-10-2011, 08:41 PM   #8
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Wow, the graphic illustration is cool.

When I was in DC recently at the Jefferson Memorial, I was thinking I could set up a shot with someone standing maybe 20 feet away from me, with the Washington Monument next to them. Have them put their arm out like it's around someone's shoulders. Take the shot with a lot of depth of field. Then keep the camera in the same exact spot, same settings, have the subject walk away and take a second shot. It should be easy in Photoshop to make a composite image of a person with their arms around the Washington Monument.

12-10-2011, 09:01 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by song_hm Quote
Well stated. Here is a graphic illustrating half the principle.
Nice catch! I saw that a few days ago and thought of posting it but I couldn't think of a *reason*, a hook for it. It's perfect here.

QuoteOriginally posted by Just1MoreDave Quote
It should be easy in Photoshop to make a composite image of a person with their arms around the Washington Monument.
Can be done, yes. Can also be done with placement and perspective.
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