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12-22-2011, 06:10 PM   #16
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So I got the lenses. Manual 50 f1.4 and the vivitar was a 28-85 f2.8-3.8 variable focus. so far I learned to permit aperature ring. Is there a way to enter an f value to still use light bar

12-22-2011, 06:52 PM   #17
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Good deals on the lenses! Especially the 50!! No, you can't enter f-stop information. The K20D has no way to know the aperture of a non-A or non-AF lens. (That's why many call for a return of the uncrippled K-mount.) You can either use any Auto mode (it defaults to Av) and shoot wide-open, or use M mode and the Green button to stop-down for metering and exposures. I do exactly that with a number of M- and K-type lenses; doesn't slow me down much.

In fact, I have a handy trick: I leave my K20D's mode dial at TAv, right next to M. I can shoot wide-open, and if I wish to stop-down, I just flick the dial to M and hit the green button. It's like a quick-shift between Auto and Manual modes.
12-22-2011, 06:54 PM   #18
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See the sticky thread at the top of this forum for info on how to use manual lenses.
12-27-2011, 11:31 AM   #19
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i can not for the life of me get a good photo witht these manual lenses. They both seem to work fine for exposure but the focus is never right. i use the little focus hex thing, i try catch-in-focus but every time i get a blurry picture like i was shooting at a 3 second shutter. 1/90th 1/250th, doesn't matter its blurry even when i get the red square saying in focus and the picture is crystal clear in the view finder.

12-27-2011, 09:46 PM   #20
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A few things:

* The red square shows WHERE the camera is trying to focus, that's all. The green hex shows focus confirmation.
* With CIF, your subject must be centered in the viewfinder -- the center is in focus, not necessarily anything else.
* Fast lenses wide-open can be hard to focus. Stop-down the aperture to f/5.6, let the ISO float as needed.
* Do you have SR on? For handheld shooting, that can make a difference.

And that last suggests an experiment. Switch SR off, set the camera on a tabletop, and aim at something. With CIF enabled, change the focus until the shutter snaps. What are the results?
12-28-2011, 06:01 AM   #21
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Yesterday when i got home, i set up the tripod and a stuffed animal on my counter. I switched to manual, Iso 200, Shutter .5", F/8, focal at 50mm on all three lenses and took a photo with each. I am definitely the problem. All three took good photos on the tripod, the 50 F1.4 being the sharpest, followed by the DA18-55 and then the Vivitar. Vivitar was also the darkest but they were all within a shade of each other. I continued to mess around with the 50 again using the flash and started to get much better results when i just accepted the fact that i'm going to need a flash in my house even with an F1.4 if i'm trying to get photos of the kids. I just have to use Manual mode with the flash as its just full flame and i get a very overexposed photo if i'm in any of the auto's.
12-29-2011, 11:13 AM   #22
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i want to buy a zoom lens. and its between the DA55-300, and Tamron 70-300. I've read 2,000 posts on this same thing and i understand the pentax is better. but no one ever says how much better, is it something my untrained eye would notice to justify the large price difference. Theres the DA-L but... I really like the macro option on the Tamron, i enjoy taking close up photos of things and don't have a macro lense. I'm right up the street from the Pittsburgh Aviary and they have the photographer safari thing on some saturdays. They let you in and hour early and a guide takes you around to get better chances of good photos then when the regular crowd is in. I would like to do this i think.
01-19-2012, 10:39 AM   #23
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well i just ordered a tamron 70-300 from B&H, i'm pretty excited about it. might just have to take it straight to the pittsburgh aviary

01-19-2012, 04:47 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by no694terry Quote
Was searching for a dslr on craigslist for a while. Was actually looking for a nikon because friends have them and borrowing lenses and stuff would have been nice. But I got a k20d for what I think was a good price at 250. I actually like it better than the nikon and my color accuracy seems better than the canon 5d a coworker has when we were shooting my office reef tank. Any way im ready for lenses and being a newbie I just gonna come right out and ask.

I need a fast lens for indoor kid shoots.

And a good lens, thinkin tamron 70-300 macro, for my reef and eagles up at my cottage.

The kit 18-55 is ok in low light on a tripod but I dont even bother trying to catch the kids with it anymore. The flash is just hideous to me and I hate using them, but then again I dont have a good flash either
If you're not afraid to get your hands moving, you might look at some of the faster MF primes that can be had for very decent prices in the marketplace. Then you can use your K20D with catch-in focus or an added split prism screen to get those low light shots in.
01-19-2012, 05:44 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by JohnBee Quote
If you're not afraid to get your hands moving, you might look at some of the faster MF primes that can be had for very decent prices in the marketplace. Then you can use your K20D with catch-in focus or an added split prism screen to get those low light shots in.
Excellent advice. A wider fast MF lens like a 24/2 has good light-gathering combined with enough depth-of-field for sharp lower-light captures. Be sure to boost the ISO to allow faster shutter speeds to eliminate motion blur. My arsenal for shooting squirmin' vermin (grandkids) indoors consists of the K20D with ISO floating 100-1600, and CIF and SR on; Vivitar-Kiron 24/2 lens wide-open; and occasional grunting to get their attention for shutter-snaps.
01-19-2012, 08:17 PM   #26
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RioRico: What does the green button have to do with metering?

I use old M42 lenses on my K20D all the time, and I never have to touch that button for any reason. The camera automatically adjusts the exposure readings in real-time as you turn the aperture ring.
01-20-2012, 02:13 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by zekewhipper Quote
RioRico: What does the green button have to do with metering?

I use old M42 lenses on my K20D all the time, and I never have to touch that button for any reason. The camera automatically adjusts the exposure readings in real-time as you turn the aperture ring.
If you put an M42 lens with adapter on the K20D and set any Auto mode, it defaults to Av and yes, shutter speed is automatically set, as is ISO within its Auto range. This works fine on many occasions. But there are times when manual metering and exposing are desirable. So except with A-type lenses, I normally leave my K20D in TAv, right next to M, and quick-switch to M when I want manual shooting.

One such situation: The subject is severely backlit, beyond the +2 EV compensation range. So move in close, meter the subject manually, then move back to position and shoot. And chimp, and adjust and reshoot as needed. Another situation: Shooting a series in a varied scene, like a desertscape with blue skies, white clouds, bright hills, dark vegetation. If you shoot in Av, every exposure differs, depending on just where the lens points. So meter manually, find a good exposure, and stick with it until the light changes.

When I want control over the exposure, I meter manually. If I'm in a hurry to grab a shot and consistency doesn't matter, I shoot Auto.
01-20-2012, 10:33 PM   #28
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M42 and Manual Mode

Your using the green button seems to be just a technique difference is all.

I did a little experimenting tonight with one of my M42's. What I found out was that when you're in Manual mode and you press the green button, the camera...

1) ...meters
2) ...then sets the shutter speed to what it thinks is right

In other words, when you press the green button, you are manually doing what the camera does automatically when in Aperture Priority mode. So why not just leave it there and then just use exposure compensation?

When I'm in Manual mode; I set the aperture and shutter speed, take the shot, chimp it, and adjust accordingly. Using the green button involves the same number of steps.

Both approaches work equally well, so it demonstrates the old saying that there is more than one way to skin a cat.

This thread did teach me something new, which is always a good thing in photography.
01-20-2012, 11:23 PM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by zekewhipper Quote
Both approaches work equally well, so it demonstrates the old saying that there is more than one way to skin a cat.
Actually, these approaches, as well as using B and X modes, have different applications, depending on just which manual lenses are used on which subjects in which light. I find it handy to switch between them as needed.
"There's more than one way to skin a cat," she mused,
as she pinned its little feet to the dissection board.
01-24-2012, 11:24 AM   #30
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been playing with the tamron trying to get good photos of my corals. i don't think the 1:2 ratio is going to cut it.

How about one of those macro extension converters for my 50/1.4????
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