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11-29-2012, 03:58 PM   #1
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Choosing the equipment for high-quality landscape photography

Hey everyone!

I'm dof and this is my first post on the forum.

First of all - to me, this forum has been a very helpful source for pretty much everything really. Now I have some hard decisions to make and I've been struggling with them for almost two weeks. I would like to ask your opinion about choosing some top notch equipment for landscape photography. I just can't make up my mind about choosing the camera and the lens, but forthe filter thing I've decided to go for Seven5 micro filter system, 100mm system or SW-150 filter holder by Lee with couple of ND filters.

Camera

So, I'm looking for a really good WA lens for landscape photography only (dim morning light and long exposure night shots). I'm also concidering the EOS 1D Mk3 over my Pentax K-5, simply because I want to be able to use the Nikon 14-24mm and some L-series lenses. Yes, Nikon glass on Canon, it is possible but you'll need an adapter. I just love that 14-24mm to death and it's razor sharp! Also, the camera body should be able to take some hits if I accidentally drop it. Never happened but just in case. I'm aware of the fact that the 1D Mk III is heavy as a horse and it may be a bit 'outdated' feature-wise compared to the K-5. I just love the whole thing and it's overall 'professional feel' in my hands. It also has an APS-H sensor which is a tad larger than APS-C. Not a great advantage though?

Lens

I love and prefer shooting wide angle. The only one I've got atm is the Samyang 14mm f2.8. It's pretty darn good for the price but quality-wise not quite there for my needs. The distortion is also quite noticeable but for me it hasn't been a problem though, thanks to the lens correction tools in PS and LR.


So, what do you think? should I -

1. keep the K-5 and get a Lee SW-150 filter holder for my Samyang 14mm (designed for Nikon 14-24 so some slight modifications may be required)

2. get a Pentax DA 12-24 and a Lee 100mm system with an adapter

3. get a Pentax DA 15 Limited and a screw-in filter (no Lee filter for this one because of the built in lens hood? Such a great lens, though)

4. get the EOS 1D Mk3 + Nikon 14-24 f2.8 (I'd get a good deal for this one)

5. get the EOS 5D Mk2+ Nikon 14-24 f2.8 (great, but I don't have enough money just yet)


Cheers!

11-29-2012, 04:23 PM - 1 Like   #2
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If landscapes are your thing, I would sell all your gear excepting the Nikon 14-24mm lens, and then get a D800.
End of story.

M
11-29-2012, 04:35 PM   #3
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Using a modern Nikon lens that does not have an aperture ring on a Canon body with an adapter will not allow you to control aperture. I'm not sure which position a Nikon defaults to, but it will either be wide open or fully stopped down.
11-29-2012, 04:41 PM   #4
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The Samyang 14 should be as sharp as the Nikon 14-24, as is the Samyang 24. For APS-C, I like the Sigma 8-16 better than the Pentax lenses. I like the K-5 for landscape, but if were about to spend a bunch of money, I'd get a D800e and Samyang lenses.

11-29-2012, 04:42 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ponosby Britt Quote
None of this matters. You can make a good photograph with just about any modern lens and camera. Your desire to make a powerful image, to plan and think ahead, to leave a warm bed in the dark, to understand exposure and lighting ratios, that matters. Do you care about the story you're telling? The equipment is the lesser component of the artistic equation.
True, but in landscape, a little more detail is important,whatever the given level of expertise and artistic vision.
11-29-2012, 04:43 PM   #6
dof
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QuoteOriginally posted by elliott Quote
Using a modern Nikon lens that does not have an aperture ring on a Canon body with an adapter will not allow you to control aperture. I'm not sure which position a Nikon defaults to, but it will either be wide open or fully stopped down.
I should be possible to control the aperture using a Novoflex adapter. Check this out: Nikon G - Canon EOS Adapter
11-29-2012, 06:24 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ponosby Britt Quote
No it isn't. It's just detail.

Is that so, junior member?
11-29-2012, 06:44 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ponosby Britt Quote
None of this matters. You can make a good photograph with just about any modern lens and camera. Your desire to make a powerful image, to plan and think ahead, to leave a warm bed in the dark, to understand exposure and lighting ratios, that matters. Do you care about the story you're telling? The equipment is the lesser component of the artistic equation.
Some people tell stories with their photographs, others just like the aesthetics. I personally have never approached a shot with the concept of a story behind it. I aim to get the most pleasing image, and if someone wishes to read into the image then it's up to them.

I also find that shooting landscapes, detail is VERY HIGH on the list of importance as you look at the details through out the photo. This comes from good glass and decent resolution from the camera's sensor.
Your point about getting up early is widely accepted as an important part of getting good landscapes, but you might also learn that shooting in not so ideal lighting can still produce some excellent images. See Ansel Adams for examples.


QuoteOriginally posted by Ponosby Britt Quote
No it isn't. It's just detail.
So you shoot with a point and shoot or your phone camera, since detail is not important to you?

QuoteOriginally posted by civiletti Quote
Is that so, junior member?
How long, or how many posts someone has on a forum is irrelevant but I do think he may have missed the mark (or just taken the most extreme view on the matter)


EDIT: Sorry for the tangent Dof, I think sticking with a nikon body for your 12-24 you will be more satisfied. The hassle of adapters is not really worth it, especially considering you will probably use it as a main lens.


Last edited by Chaos_Realm; 11-29-2012 at 06:57 PM.
11-29-2012, 07:10 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Miguel Quote
If landscapes are your thing, I would sell all your gear excepting the Nikon 14-24mm lens, and then get a D800.
End of story.

M
Or D800E
11-29-2012, 09:49 PM - 1 Like   #10
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I shoot landscapes professionally and must say that good equipment is only a benefit if one is able to take advantage of its benefits. Talent is of paramount importance. A great photo is great whether it was taken with a Kx, 645D or a 5x7. One of the best shots I have ever seen was from 35mm film (Kitt Peak Observatory with lightning- Arizona Highways). The equipment is secondary to the photographer's ability.

Last edited by desertscape; 11-29-2012 at 10:02 PM.
11-29-2012, 11:38 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ponosby Britt Quote
Nope. Too much detail, with the DoF of P&S sensors.

Neither did these guys in the Forum Exclusive Gallery. Not much detail but they made landscape images with impact. If detail is the criteria of a successful landscape image, you ought to protest their inclusion to the Forum Exclusive Gallery.

To quote myself:
QuoteOriginally posted by Chaos_Realm Quote
I also find that shooting landscapes, detail is VERY HIGH on the list of importance as you look at the details through out the photo.
This is my view in relation to viewing a photo and selecting gear I wish to purchase to get a photo ( the latter of which directly relates to what this thread is about). To give reason: You can always remove detail in PP but it is very hard to put it in. As for the shots you linked to a lot of these were Silhouettes, they are just another weapon in a photographers arsenal, they draw the eye of the viewer to the detail of the shapes and outlines... and coincidentally these shot with quality lenses eg DA*55-300/DA*50-135/FA 50 1.4/Sigma 17-70.

That said if it were to come to printing these images a couple might struggle getting to even A4 @ 300dpi on a low resolution sensor such as the K100D. Obviously you can reduce to 240dpi and get there, but this will see a loss of print quality and doesn't allow for much cropping without further loss of quality. But keeping them stashed away on a hard drive or posting low res files on the web they should be fine... if that's your cup of tea. In short quality glass (not necessarily expensive) and Decent resolution from cameras (depends if your print or not) are important.

And just to clarify, I have absolutely no problem with most of the entries in the PEG. There are a couple of shots i personally feel don't meet the standard but that is why there is a rating system and they will be rated based on the majorities opinion.

I am not going to discuss this further. If you wish to discuss the importance of detail in landscape photos, I suggest you open your own thread on that topic.



....Back to the thread
11-30-2012, 06:45 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by civiletti Quote
Is that so, junior member?
Just because someone is new to the forum and doesn't have 10,000 posts doesn't mean he is new to photography, or that his opinions are any less valid than yours.

There's not a lot of detail in this landscape:

Western Lake Art Large Original 24x48 Pointillist by EdMcCarthy

Is it a bad landscape? Some might think so, others no doubt will love it.
11-30-2012, 11:42 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ponosby Britt Quote
Nope. Too much detail, with the DoF of P&S sensors.

Neither did these guys in the Forum Exclusive Gallery. Not much detail but they made landscape images with impact. If detail is the criteria of a successful landscape image, you ought to protest their inclusion to the Forum Exclusive Gallery.


Days End! - Pentax User Photo Gallery

Black on orange - Pentax User Photo Gallery

Part of the River - Pentax User Photo Gallery

Autumn sunrise - Pentax User Photo Gallery

[langtitle=ru]Состояние[/langtitle] - Pentax User Photo Gallery

Harvest - Pentax User Photo Gallery

Clouds not on the sky - Pentax User Photo Gallery

Morning mist - Pentax User Photo Gallery

Unexpected Light - Pentax User Photo Gallery

Those are nice images. Pretty atmospherics often produce nice images, but most photo opportunities are not dominated by them. And even in such cases, more resolution can mean finer grained, smoother atmospherics.
11-30-2012, 11:51 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by MPrince Quote
Just because someone is new to the forum and doesn't have 10,000 posts doesn't mean he is new to photography, or that his opinions are any less valid than yours.

There's not a lot of detail in this landscape:

Western Lake Art Large Original 24x48 Pointillist by EdMcCarthy

Is it a bad landscape? Some might think so, others no doubt will love it.

I was pulling his leg. Of course his opinion can be as valid as someone who has posted here for decades. In this case, though, it is not. One can do swell landscape work on low res equipment, but that does no invalidate another photographer's desire for higher res equipment. Style varies.
11-30-2012, 11:55 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by MPrince Quote
Just because someone is new to the forum and doesn't have 10,000 posts doesn't mean he is new to photography, or that his opinions are any less valid than yours.

There's not a lot of detail in this landscape:

Western Lake Art Large Original 24x48 Pointillist by EdMcCarthy

Is it a bad landscape? Some might think so, others no doubt will love it.

Not the sort of image I'm interested in making.
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