Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
12-06-2012, 11:07 AM   #16
Senior Member




Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Upstate NY
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 115
Original Poster
thanks guys, one more question.. I can't for the life of me figure out how the wireless flash triggers work. I have read a bunch of stuff, but still don't grasp it completely. I know I'll be using the flash in manual mode(what does that mean?). I just don't understand how I'll get the off camera YN560 to flash when I take the picture on my K-R. I guess the question is, how do the triggers work, and is that all I will need or is there an adapter I need to get as well.

Oh..two questions I guess haha, Light meters, will it make my life a lot easier to get one that will account for the ambient and flash light?

12-06-2012, 11:41 AM   #17
Site Supporter
JimJohnson's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lake Superior - Michigan
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,164
Install transmitter on camera hotshoe, install flash on receiver. make sure both are on the same frequency channel, turn them on, turn on the flash, turn on the camera.
What manual mode means in terms of your flash depends on what controls it has. At the simplest, it means the flash will output at 100% each time. Some flashes have operator settings to to output a percentage of full output - could be in quarters (25%, 50%, 75%) for even finer. Read the user manual.
On your camera, you will probably get better results using manually controlled shutter, aperture and ISO. Shutter speed has to be 1/180th or longer when doing manual flash (why longer? You may want to get a mix of flash and ambient lighting.) To properly set ISO and aperture you need to know how much light will reach your subject. Either you have to do the math, buy a flash meter, or run lots of test shots.

And that my friend is what manual flash is all about. Its a lot of planning, and often hard brain work, but when done right, it will beat any automated exposure system.
12-06-2012, 03:38 PM   #18
Pentaxian
LeDave's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Minneapolis - St. Paul
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,895
QuoteOriginally posted by csmoore Quote
thanks guys, one more question.. I can't for the life of me figure out how the wireless flash triggers work. I have read a bunch of stuff, but still don't grasp it completely. I know I'll be using the flash in manual mode(what does that mean?). I just don't understand how I'll get the off camera YN560 to flash when I take the picture on my K-R. I guess the question is, how do the triggers work, and is that all I will need or is there an adapter I need to get as well.

Oh..two questions I guess haha, Light meters, will it make my life a lot easier to get one that will account for the ambient and flash light?
Without a light-meter, you'll have to measure things manually and that applies basic mathematics.

How to Calculate Flash Exposure
12-08-2012, 03:53 PM   #19
Veteran Member
Anvh's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 4,616
QuoteOriginally posted by LeDave Quote
Without a light-meter, you'll have to measure things manually and that applies basic mathematics.

How to Calculate Flash Exposure
With digital a photo doesnt cost much if any money so you can take a "test" shot and look at the histogram for your exposure.

But this doesnt work well if you're working with more flashes and want to balance them correctly.

12-08-2012, 04:26 PM   #20
Veteran Member
TOUGEFC's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Brisbane
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,561
Forget those piddly little softbox's they are rubbish. Get at least 24inch's anything smaller and your wasting your time and money.
12-08-2012, 05:48 PM   #21
Veteran Member
magkelly's Avatar

Join Date: May 2010
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 5,905
Save your money. You can easily make a soft box screen from PVC and some kind of nice thin white muslin material and put any standard photo light behind it. (I used some nice natural cotton curtains actually because muslin tends to run a bit expensive at JoAnn's here....) Personally I don't think strobes and such are all that necessary for a beginner. Why? Because regular photo lamps you can move the lights and really see where the light is going and that helps tremendously when your first starting to do portraiture. Why make things more complicated than you need to at first?

Having one strobe set up to play with will be good but I'd still suggest you pick up one of CS's standard lighting kits and go with that. You can get a kit with 3 or even 4 lights for a lot less than a soft box on Amazon and you'll have a lot of versatility that way and in the meantime for like $50 you can make yourself a light box panel like this:

Studio Lighting - DIY Cheap Soft Light Panel Frame Designed for Flash (or hotlight) | DIYPhotography.net

or this

Studio Lighting - Soft Panel Frame Designed for Hotlight | DIYPhotography.net

It's not hard to do at all. This site is a budget photographer's best friend, btw. There's practically nothing you could ever need that they haven't built on the cheap on there. There's also tutorials on there and on youtube for hold up panels, beauty dishes, just about anything you could need for a photo studio.

I actually like the Cowboy Studio stuff. I think it's well worth the $$$ and I have a couple of their basic lighting sets. But there are some things you could build yourself for a bit less and that would give you more to work with for less $$$. Also, buy used. It saves a lot of $$$. I bought their basic light sets with silver, gold and white umbrellas on sale in the warehouse on Amazon for about half their normal price. I bought the basic white, black and green screen backdrops and display bar and I did end up buying a boom light fixture because it was also on sale in the Amazon warehouse but I did not pay full price for any of it.

The rest? I've made myself from designs on sites like the one above. For a while I was practically living in the PVC section of the hardware store, at Goodwill, and at Micheal's true, but doing that I saved myself a ton of money on a couple of nice table light box set up, on light box panels, and several other things. I've turned old picture frames into light panels. Made reflectors out of car sun reflectors, out of picture frames and gold and silver craft tin foil. I've got one of those fold out V frame white background sets that usually cost a 1K or more only I made mine from dry wall for $25. My next DIY project I'm going to put up fake brick on a wall outside in our screen room. I've already done up the screen windows out there with semi transparent white plastic so as to more diffuse the harsh light coming into the screen room. The whole roll cost plus some new spline cost me all of $12 and you should see the light out there now. It's just gorgeous in the morning and the afternoon.

Thinking outside the box is a necessity for me. I had a shoe string budget when it came to putting up a studio. I had to spend $350 or less to do it and so far I've actually managed to do most of what I needed and I'm actually well under budget for props and lights and that. It is possible to have a decent studio set up sans a lot of money though if you're willing to put a little bit more time into it. I've actually got a better set up in some ways than my one teacher's and it's a lot more portable than a lot of his stuff is besides. He probably spent like $10,000 on his set up. Mine didn't even cost me a fraction of that and it's a heck of a lot more portable than his besides.

There's probably stuff all around you that you can use to make your studio. Put your $$$ where they really need to go on lenses and the camera. Lights, panels, soft boxes, and stuff like that, you can totally fake a lot of it if you have to. Oh, and a green screen that's handy too because you can easily get digital backdrops or even make them yourself in an image editor like Photoshop if you're artsy. With a green screen I don't have just a few backgrounds, I have thousands of potential backgrounds and that is going to make me more $$$ in the end because I'm not going out there and buying them at $25-200 a pop. Add a green screen and you have far more to work with than with just black and white. I consider a $20 green screen pretty much a basic screen. Wouldn't do without it.

Also, watch this, watch it several times. It's a very informative little trick....


Last edited by magkelly; 12-08-2012 at 05:54 PM.
12-08-2012, 06:51 PM   #22
Site Supporter
JimJohnson's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lake Superior - Michigan
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,164
And sometimes it just doesn't pay to do it yourself...
Photography Studio 43" Umbrella Photo Kit 85W Day Light Bulbs | eBay

I have this kit. It's not pro quality, but it gets you started on studio photography on a minuscule budget. I plan on adding clamps to hold my two flashes for more options. The carry bag is handy if you don't have a permanent studio. What I'm saving my money for are portable back drops.

By the way, constant lighting as used in Magkelly's offered 'egg video' is one of the better ways to understand how light shapes the photograph.

Last edited by JimJohnson; 12-08-2012 at 06:58 PM.
12-09-2012, 12:44 PM   #23
Veteran Member
mrNewt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ON, RH
Posts: 2,170
QuoteOriginally posted by magkelly Quote
Save your money. You can easily make a soft box screen from PVC and some kind of nice thin white muslin material and put any standard photo light behind it. (I used some nice natural cotton curtains actually because muslin tends to run a bit expensive at JoAnn's here....) Personally I don't think strobes and such are all that necessary for a beginner. Why? Because regular photo lamps you can move the lights and really see where the light is going and that helps tremendously when your first starting to do portraiture. Why make things more complicated than you need to at first?

Having one strobe set up to play with will be good but I'd still suggest you pick up one of CS's standard lighting kits and go with that. You can get a kit with 3 or even 4 lights for a lot less than a soft box on Amazon and you'll have a lot of versatility that way and in the meantime for like $50 you can make yourself a light box panel like this:

Studio Lighting - DIY Cheap Soft Light Panel Frame Designed for Flash (or hotlight) | DIYPhotography.net

or this

Studio Lighting - Soft Panel Frame Designed for Hotlight | DIYPhotography.net

It's not hard to do at all. This site is a budget photographer's best friend, btw. There's practically nothing you could ever need that they haven't built on the cheap on there. There's also tutorials on there and on youtube for hold up panels, beauty dishes, just about anything you could need for a photo studio.

I actually like the Cowboy Studio stuff. I think it's well worth the $$$ and I have a couple of their basic lighting sets. But there are some things you could build yourself for a bit less and that would give you more to work with for less $$$. Also, buy used. It saves a lot of $$$. I bought their basic light sets with silver, gold and white umbrellas on sale in the warehouse on Amazon for about half their normal price. I bought the basic white, black and green screen backdrops and display bar and I did end up buying a boom light fixture because it was also on sale in the Amazon warehouse but I did not pay full price for any of it.

The rest? I've made myself from designs on sites like the one above. For a while I was practically living in the PVC section of the hardware store, at Goodwill, and at Micheal's true, but doing that I saved myself a ton of money on a couple of nice table light box set up, on light box panels, and several other things. I've turned old picture frames into light panels. Made reflectors out of car sun reflectors, out of picture frames and gold and silver craft tin foil. I've got one of those fold out V frame white background sets that usually cost a 1K or more only I made mine from dry wall for $25. My next DIY project I'm going to put up fake brick on a wall outside in our screen room. I've already done up the screen windows out there with semi transparent white plastic so as to more diffuse the harsh light coming into the screen room. The whole roll cost plus some new spline cost me all of $12 and you should see the light out there now. It's just gorgeous in the morning and the afternoon.

Thinking outside the box is a necessity for me. I had a shoe string budget when it came to putting up a studio. I had to spend $350 or less to do it and so far I've actually managed to do most of what I needed and I'm actually well under budget for props and lights and that. It is possible to have a decent studio set up sans a lot of money though if you're willing to put a little bit more time into it. I've actually got a better set up in some ways than my one teacher's and it's a lot more portable than a lot of his stuff is besides. He probably spent like $10,000 on his set up. Mine didn't even cost me a fraction of that and it's a heck of a lot more portable than his besides.

There's probably stuff all around you that you can use to make your studio. Put your $$$ where they really need to go on lenses and the camera. Lights, panels, soft boxes, and stuff like that, you can totally fake a lot of it if you have to. Oh, and a green screen that's handy too because you can easily get digital backdrops or even make them yourself in an image editor like Photoshop if you're artsy. With a green screen I don't have just a few backgrounds, I have thousands of potential backgrounds and that is going to make me more $$$ in the end because I'm not going out there and buying them at $25-200 a pop. Add a green screen and you have far more to work with than with just black and white. I consider a $20 green screen pretty much a basic screen. Wouldn't do without it.

Also, watch this, watch it several times. It's a very informative little trick....

Photography Lighting Lesson - Remember the EGG - YouTube
Very good advice over here .

12-09-2012, 12:58 PM   #24
Senior Member




Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Upstate NY
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 115
Original Poster
Thank you guys, that's all awesome advice. Looks like I'm going to need to go to lowes. I still haven't decided on anything yet though..there's just so much to consider and factor for. I'm not completely sold on continuous lighting. I think I'd have more fun using a speedlite. I have no problem with trial and error and I think learning in manual mode will help me understand things more, I have a lot of free time so that helps too, lol.
12-10-2012, 07:42 AM   #25
Veteran Member
mrNewt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ON, RH
Posts: 2,170
QuoteOriginally posted by csmoore Quote
... I'm not completely sold on continuous lighting. I think I'd have more fun using a speedlite...
Light is light ... no matter what you are using. In the end, is whatever works for you .

Continuous light is better usually for beginners to help them understand how light works or when you try new techniques or new challenging subjects. Continuous light is something that you always see what it does - consider it like a live preview .
With speedlights you usually have to have some degree of understanding on how light works and what it will do to your subject (since you don't have the "live preview" already).

Good luck and let us know what you decided .
12-10-2012, 07:58 AM - 1 Like   #26
Site Supporter
JimJohnson's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lake Superior - Michigan
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,164
QuoteOriginally posted by mrNewt Quote
Continuous light is something that you always see what it does - consider it like a live preview .
With speedlights you usually have to have some degree of understanding on how light works and what it will do to your subject (since you don't have the "live preview" already).
+1 ... even if you decide to light your subject with strobes, continuous lighting has been in use by pros for a LONG time. It is often called modelling light. You use it to setup and balance your lighting, turn off the continuous lighting, and make your exposures with strobes / flash from the same location.

I plan to keep my continuous lighting rig described above and just add flash shoes (a bit over US $5 per flash unit). That way I can shoot continuous, or use continuous only for modelling and shoot flash. Or I suppose, forgo the modelling if I already know my setup and just use flash.
12-10-2012, 08:47 AM   #27
Senior Member




Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Upstate NY
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 115
Original Poster
Since I've pretty much decided on a YN560 with a softbox, I think fill light will be pretty important to make the shadows less harsh in some situations, correct? Would continuous lighting serve the purpose as a fill light when a reflector isn't an option?
12-10-2012, 08:50 AM - 1 Like   #28
Veteran Member
mrNewt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ON, RH
Posts: 2,170
You could use a continuous light as a fill light if you want to ... yes.
12-10-2012, 11:36 AM   #29
Site Supporter
JimJohnson's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lake Superior - Michigan
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,164
QuoteOriginally posted by mrNewt Quote
You could use a continuous light as a fill light if you want to ... yes.
Well.... with the caviate that unless both the flash and the fill are the same color, it is almost impossible to achieve the proper white balance - unless of course you WANT the effect of two different color temps / casts.

For example, I've watched several pros working banquets put gels over their flash to match them to the color of the ambient lighting (typically tungsten) for just this reason. If you re-read my post on using constant lighting for modelling, you'll notice I indicated to turn off the modelling lights before taking the picture with flash. This is the reason.
12-10-2012, 11:38 AM   #30
Veteran Member
mrNewt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ON, RH
Posts: 2,170
QuoteOriginally posted by JimJohnson Quote
Well.... with the caviate that unless both the flash and the fill are the same color, it is almost impossible to achieve the proper white balance - unless of course you WANT the effect of two different color temps / casts.

For example, I've watched several pros working banquets put gels over their flash to match them to the color of the ambient lighting (typically tungsten) for just this reason.
I thought that goes without saying ...
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
amazon.com, background, camera, cowboystudio, flash, muslin, pentax help, photo, photography, price, support, system
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is this a good deal on a KX jasonz Pentax DSLR Discussion 7 02-12-2012 07:58 PM
Want to score a free lighting setup? Adam Flashes, Lighting, and Studio 9 12-15-2011 12:11 PM
Is this a good buy? Pepe Guitarra Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 13 09-02-2011 06:13 PM
Is this a good low budget lighting kit for an amateur? shaolin95 Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 9 11-15-2008 02:16 AM
Is this umbrella setup any good? drabina Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 15 10-26-2008 04:20 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:55 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top