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01-14-2013, 10:32 PM   #1
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Lens hood for 50mm 1.4 (most effective)

Hi !

I am interested in buying a lens hood for my newly acquired fa 50mm 1.4, and use on my other Pentax-F auto focus lenses.

I have searched on eBay and have found various generic kinds and sizes:
  • There are collapsible rubber hoods - which I don't like because they look like a plumbers plunger.
  • Petal hoods which can be rotated to counter auto focus rotation - Does it work well ?
  • Short metal hoods.
  • Medium metal hoods.
  • Long metal hoods.
  • Short vented hoods.
  • Plastic hoods with an adapter that allows you to reverse the hood for storage - seems real convenient.


Is there an optimal size for the 50mm 1.4 ? Or would I need a few different sizes ? Should the opening be very large or moderately sized ? Is the petal style any good ?

Has any body had a variety of these lens hoods to compare ?


Last edited by zoolander; 01-14-2013 at 10:36 PM. Reason: Bullet points didn't work right
01-14-2013, 11:01 PM   #2
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You can use something really deep for the FA 50/1.4. The hood for the Takumar 135/3.5 doesn't vignette on my A50/1.4 and it's at least 2" deep. I recently used a hood about 1" deep for that lens and it seemed to be effective.

I generally pull something out of a drawer that kind of works and vow to one day sort out the hood situation.
01-14-2013, 11:32 PM   #3
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I'm using the exact same hood (Takumar 135/150/200) on my M 50mm f1.4 lens with no vignetting... and there are many of these for sale at the auction site. I personally prefer the metal/hard plastic hoods to the rubber ones... though it obviously increases the size and storage space of the lens (I like to keep the hood on all of the time and just find a pinch lens cap that fits the end of the hood.) Reversible hoods are nice but I think in most cases the lens needs to be designed to use them (ie they mount to the lens separate from the filter threads) and I don't believe that any of the 50's were.

Last edited by sunny16; 01-14-2013 at 11:58 PM.
01-15-2013, 02:36 AM   #4
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i use a 3 way extending tele-hood i got together with a filter bundle on ebay ... i cant tell how IMPORTENTt it is to use a hood with this lens because its very vulnerable to scattered light.

Pentax 50mm Prime Lens Shootout - Lens Flare - PentaxForums.com

and i believe that the FA is improving alot, especially at fast arpetures ...

01-15-2013, 04:45 AM   #5
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Donansearchin the forum for a spreadsheet I uploaded called hoodcalc. The file is hoodcalc.zip.

This allows the calculation of ideal hood length (no vignetting) based on focal length, hood diameter, front element diameter(not filter size)

The only problem with the calculation is that it does not consider the setback of the front element into the lens, so you need to subtract a few mm in length because the calculation gives you the length of the hood from the center of the front element

Usually for a 50mm lens I use the hood from a 105mm lens and it seems to work fine
01-15-2013, 05:30 AM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
Donansearchin the forum for a spreadsheet I uploaded called hoodcalc. The file is hoodcalc.zip.

This allows the calculation of ideal hood length (no vignetting) based on focal length, hood diameter, front element diameter(not filter size)

The only problem with the calculation is that it does not consider the setback of the front element into the lens, so you need to subtract a few mm in length because the calculation gives you the length of the hood from the center of the front element

Usually for a 50mm lens I use the hood from a 105mm lens and it seems to work fine
Lowell, the 50/1.4 element is pretty far forward, it's the 1.7's element that is recessed (hence its better resistance to flare and better contrast without a hood, because it really has one built into the design).

I use a 3-stage rubber hood (the one that looks like a plunger ) because its flexible, stores more easily, and provides more protection to the lens than a rigid hood.
01-15-2013, 07:48 AM   #7
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how does the 1.4 performs against the 1.7 (at 1.8 for shure) if u attache a hood ?! is the difference still there ?!
01-15-2013, 08:18 AM   #8
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I like the idea some poster mentioned on these forums some time ago: using a step down ring, down to 30mm or something.

01-15-2013, 08:48 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by paranoia23 Quote
how does the 1.4 performs against the 1.7 (at 1.8 for shure) if u attache a hood ?! is the difference still there ?!
There are a number of comparisons on the forum. Many claim the 1.7 is superior, even when the 1.4 has a hood, I don't agree but there is room to debate it. One thing the 1.7 can never do is let in as much light as the 1.4
01-15-2013, 09:26 AM   #10
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Get a metal one that's at least 1.5 or 2 inches long. Many eBay sellers will label them as "tele". That way you get both protection (vs a plastic or rubber one) and good contrast by restricting more light from the sides.

I would suggest to get one for every lens you plan to use and leave it on permanently. Most metal ones come with threads on the front so you can attach a lens cap to them (usually a couple mm wider).

If you plan to use a polarizer filer, you can attach the filter on the lens and then the hood on the filter, giving you a convenient way to rotate the filter by grabbing the hood (metal works best).
01-15-2013, 09:32 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Docrwm Quote
Lowell, the 50/1.4 element is pretty far forward, it's the 1.7's element that is recessed (hence its better resistance to flare and better contrast without a hood, because it really has one built into the design).

I use a 3-stage rubber hood (the one that looks like a plunger ) because its flexible, stores more easily, and provides more protection to the lens than a rigid hood.
The rubber hood likely does little more than the bare lens based upon the angle they extend outward at, when installed on a 50mm lens.

The whole idea is to take the hood out to almost the limit of vignetting. The less stray light into the lens, the less that is absorbed in the baffles, or more importantly let into the mirror box where it bounces around and hits the rear element reducing contrast
01-15-2013, 01:11 PM   #12
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Since this is the beginner's section, here's a photo of the Takumar hood I mentioned, on an A50/1.4. A bit of motion blur, I was rushing the shot, sorry.



It's labeled "Takumar 1:3.5 135mm 1:4 150mm 1:5.6 200mm Asahi Opt. Co., Japan 49 "
This hood is 2" (50mm) from the rim to the start of the filter threads. The front opening is not a conventional filter size or threaded - it's grooved. I have some 62mm pinch caps that fit it and some that are too big. You can find them on eBay for way too much, get one with the lens it's supposed to go with, or sometimes find one mislabeled or in a thrift store for 50 cents.

I have some slightly shorter metal hoods labeled S&W that I got from "heavystar" on eBay that are a good alternative. They have a threaded 58mm opening which works well with a cap.

For this lens, I'd like to find a plastic hood, 49mm threads, 40-50mm deep, slightly larger inside diameter than the outside diameter of the lens (67mm?), lined with felt. Then I could unscrew the hood, reverse it, slide it onto the lens body and cap the hood threads for storage. It would be most effective for me because a bulky hood stays at home, no matter how much light it blocks.
01-15-2013, 01:25 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
The rubber hood likely does little more than the bare lens based upon the angle they extend outward at, when installed on a 50mm lens.

The whole idea is to take the hood out to almost the limit of vignetting. The less stray light into the lens, the less that is absorbed in the baffles, or more importantly let into the mirror box where it bounces around and hits the rear element reducing contrast
Not based on my comparisons, it increases contrast and sharpness a good bit - particularly <2.8.

I also find the assertions by many that rigid hoods protect better than rubber ones baffling. Rigid hoods transfer more energy directly to the camera because they do not collapse or absorb anything (particularly metal ones - the plastic ones can at least potentially shatter thereby dissipating some of the energy).
01-15-2013, 01:32 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Docrwm Quote
Not based on my comparisons, it increases contrast and sharpness a good bit - particularly <2.8.

I also find the assertions by many that rigid hoods protect better than rubber ones baffling. Rigid hoods transfer more energy directly to the camera because they do not collapse or absorb anything (particularly metal ones - the plastic ones can at least potentially shatter thereby dissipating some of the energy).
I think the issue is a function of direction of impact. Metal hoods absorb energy only if the impact bends the hood, but also protects the front element better because as you point out they do not collapse readily, rubber hoods, in on axis impact do very little, radial impact is another thing all together, there, rubber hoods are better I would agree because they do absorb hits. but back to the main reason. a strait metal hood is likely to to a lot more than a generic rubber hood, unless the rubber hood extends out to the point of vignetting also, but in my experience they flare out so rapidly they do very little conisdering the FOV of a 50mm lens on aps c sensord
01-15-2013, 01:48 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by Docrwm Quote
Not based on my comparisons, it increases contrast and sharpness a good bit - particularly <2.8.

I also find the assertions by many that rigid hoods protect better than rubber ones baffling. Rigid hoods transfer more energy directly to the camera because they do not collapse or absorb anything (particularly metal ones - the plastic ones can at least potentially shatter thereby dissipating some of the energy).
Baffling. And then Lowell uses "flare out" to describe the rubber hoods. Ha!

I bet those cool-looking vented hoods effectively have crumple zones like recent cars. The Takumar hood is not going to crumple, much like the lens it was meant for. But without IIHS frontal impact tests, the innocent purchaser doesn't know what to buy.
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