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04-29-2013, 08:28 PM   #1
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lens for making movies?

What lens is better for making films , prime or zoom ?

04-29-2013, 08:30 PM   #2
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Generally speaking you'll want a zoom so that you can adjust your perspective and framing more easily. Fixed-aperture zooms work best as with them, the shutter speed/ISO doesn't need to be adjusted while zooming.

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04-29-2013, 08:32 PM   #3
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Either or... Zooms allow you to quickly recompose without a lens change. Whichever allows you to create the composition you want, there is no wrong answer.
04-29-2013, 09:15 PM   #4
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Really it depends what you're going for, I don't have any experience in this area, but a friend of mine who is a videographer, suggests a wide angel lens for most of what he does, which is a lot of outdoorsy stuff and what not. Personally I'd get a wide angel and a medium telephoto, just to be safe, however that can get to be kinda pricey, and you don't need one that is AF for just doing video. Pentax doesn't support AF when recording, so if you also use your camera for taking photos and don't mind MF then that is fine, unless you aren't using a Pentax camera for it, in which case you might have to spend a bit more for the AF (which is pretty pricey for a good lens)

04-29-2013, 09:16 PM   #5
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"1 touch zooms" allow you to change focus and focal length with one hand. And it should have constant aperture like f/3.5 or f/4 so you donīt have to change time value or ISO. A70-210/4 for example.
04-29-2013, 09:23 PM   #6
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I guess any push-pull (one touch) zoom would be good, another thing, if you can't find one that is constant aperture, find one with an aperture ring. This will basically allow you to set your aperture to whatever you want, like say you have a 70-300 f/3.5-6.3 the aperture ring can be set to 3.5 and at its max zoom length, it will be 3.5 rather than 6.3
04-29-2013, 09:32 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Bcrary3 Quote
a 70-300 f/3.5-6.3 the aperture ring can be set to 3.5 and at its max zoom length, it will be 3.5 rather than 6.3
how is that possible? aperture will be f/6.3.. the lens would defy physics if not!
04-29-2013, 09:40 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by carrrlangas Quote
how is that possible? aperture will be f/6.3.. the lens would defy physics if not!
By using the aperture dial, you hold the blades all the way open. Rather than having the camera control the aperture, the dial basically allowed the user to set it to a specific number, and it applies over all focal length of the lens. If you have an old zoom lens that has the aperture dial feature, open it all the way up, and zoom in an out with it, and they blades shouldn't close any, now if that lens is an A lens, then it can also be controlled by the camera. Put the lens on the camera, and set it to the A function, and zoom all the way out, it will say f/6.3, but not if you manually control it.

04-29-2013, 11:03 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Bcrary3 Quote
By using the aperture dial, you hold the blades all the way open. Rather than having the camera control the aperture, the dial basically allowed the user to set it to a specific number, and it applies over all focal length of the lens. If you have an old zoom lens that has the aperture dial feature, open it all the way up, and zoom in an out with it, and they blades shouldn't close any, now if that lens is an A lens, then it can also be controlled by the camera. Put the lens on the camera, and set it to the A function, and zoom all the way out, it will say f/6.3, but not if you manually control it.
Even if you leave the lens set to f/3.5 via the aperture ring it will "automatically" close it self down to f/6.3 when you reach 300mm by zooming the lens.
If not, why wouldnīt it be advertised as a constant f/3.5? that would be quite a range for a constant aperture zoom!
Remermber the definition of aperture value: f/3.5 at 28mm means the diameter of the aperture is 28mm/3.5 = 8mm. If the lens could do f/3.5 at 300mm then the diameter of the aperture should be 300/3.5 = 85mm.
Now look at the front element and check whether this is possiblre.

Another way to test it:
Leave the lens set to f/3.5 via the aperture ring and:
1- take a picture at 28mm and another one at 300he using the same shutter speed. Are the exposures identical?
2- take a picture at 300mm. Set the aperture ring to f/6.3 and take another one using the same shutter speed. Are them identical?
04-29-2013, 11:20 PM   #10
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And better lenses, ones made for film/video, minimize focus breathing (a change in angle of view when you refocus) thus changing your composition. Typically, still lenses did not really need to take that into account. But today with video now on still cameras, it is become a design consideration.
04-29-2013, 11:45 PM   #11
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I throw in another observation, totally different.

Since I started collecting the old Takumar primes from the 60s and 70s I have looked more critically at the aethetics of the images in TV and movies. I have noticed that some seem to use modern lenses with the emphasis on sharp, and with moderately stopped down settings to get deep DoF and sharpness all over. Others seem to achieve te aesthetic properties of the older lenses with the bokeh effects etc characteristic of them. I notice this even in recent productions, such as the Korean TV series made in the past few years.

But one of the important aesthetic factors I have noticed is that any movie or TV series seems to use the same aesthetic for all the lenses they use throughout, as a kind of aesthetic theme.

Last edited by tim60; 04-30-2013 at 12:15 AM. Reason: added a paragraph
04-30-2013, 02:44 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by carrrlangas Quote
"1 touch zooms" allow you to change focus and focal length with one hand. And it should have constant aperture like f/3.5 or f/4 so you donīt have to change time value or ISO. A70-210/4 for example
A70-210/4 is a great video lens, but also big...
i quite like the M 75-150 f4. small, comfy and big one touch zoom...
combine that with a manual 50mm 1.7 & a 28mm.
04-30-2013, 03:11 AM   #13
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I've got a series 1 Vivitar 70-150mm one touch zoom, and also use my M50/1.4, I've removed the aperture lever and ball from the aperture ring on both, ensuring noise free focus, zoom and aperture change. This helps if you have only the camera sound recording, especially if you change aperture while shooting, eliminating the click of the aperture ball. On which focal length to choose, it will surely depend on what you want to shoot, as with normal still photography. I've used old lenses of up to 640mm without any problem...
04-30-2013, 07:10 AM   #14
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Since Pentax cams don't use autofocus w/ zoom lenses while shooting video, you want to be aware of whether the lens is parfocal or varifocal. (Parfocal lets you focus, and it stays in focus throughout the zoom range.) HERE is a list I started of parfocal lenses.
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