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11-06-2013, 08:22 PM   #16
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Another question I keep forgetting to ask is I live in a humid climate. This year especially there's been fog every morning. Are these lenses safe to use in this weather, or do I need to bite the bullet and stick with just weather resistant? Can I take a non WR lens in fog to take pictures? Obviously I wouldn't take it out in the rain, but I don't know how weather-proof a lens needs to be for it to survive in, for example, fog.

11-06-2013, 09:45 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lovephotography Quote
I forgot to ask what flash support is. Will the flash not turn on if I use an all manual lens, or does it have to do with timing?
If the camera doesn't detect a lens it can control, the popup flash will fire at full power. A flash mounted on the hot shoe will fire but is on its own for power and settings - the camera won't try to figure out flash settings. If you want to use flash with older lenses, then, the popup flash is mostly out. But a lot of inexpensive hotshoe-mounted flashes allow you to control their power manually.

I like to use flash at a low power setting to freeze motion, so I have more freedom with shutter speed. I usually use a 90mm macro lens and dial down the flash to a low manual setting. Here is one example. :

11-06-2013, 11:20 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lovephotography Quote
It seems everyone prefers the f1.8 over the f1.4, so I will try to buy that one first (and, apparently, the aperture will suite me better at a higher number anyway [f3 etc]). I'm not concerned about manual focus, as that's the number one thing I love doing with a camera. I hate the point-and-shoots that we've owned because there was no manual focusing. My father's old Minolta was totally manual and that's what I'm looking for again (I didn't even understand aperture -I thought it was just another focusing tool). I took great pictures with it and I'm looking forward to taking great pictures with my own camera.
. The slower F1.8 lens is a good lens, and lots of people love it. The 1/2 stop loss over F1.4 is not as critical for low light shooting as it was In the film era, especially with newer cameras, because high ISO performance is so much better.

As for focusing, if you do manual focusing you should get a split image viewfinder, because the stock focusing screen is not optimized for fast lenses and it is hard to determine exact focus with the stock screen.

Aperture is not a focusing tool, aperture controls two things on a lens, depth of field, which is the range of acceptable sharpness in an image, and the light as part of the overall exposure control. Faster lenses allow more light when wide open, and also when wide open, less depth of field
QuoteQuote:
What's "green-button metering"? Is it when there's a green dot showing how much light the camera is receiving? I had that with Dad's Minolta and it was nice for getting the proper lighting in the pictures.
Green button metering is a feature of Pentax cameras where you press the green button on certain models (or I think it is AE on the entry level models) to set the shutter to a speed that for your set aperture will give correct exposure

QuoteOriginally posted by Lovephotography Quote
I'm a she, not a he
. Sorry
QuoteQuote:

So the green light metering is what ISO the camera chooses, as in if the aperture isn't what moves then the camera needs to keep deciding the ISO again and again? That doesn't sound like too much trouble for me and it might be what I did with the Minolta. Actually, I'd like to try my hand at full manual control on the camera -shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. The fun of taking a picture, for me, is the work put into making it perfect; the more manual it is the more the picture is "mine" and not the camera's.
no see above, green button metering is a one button reset of shutter speed to match the light, ISO,and apterture you have set. With manual lenses the only exposure mode is manual, so you don't have auto ISO. You set aperture on the lens, set ISO on the body, and then point the camera at the subject, press the green button and it sets the shutter for correct exposure given the lighting. What I do, is find a surface that is a middle grey in the lighting I am shooting in, and point the camera at it. Then press the green button and this sets the exposure for the light I have. You only need to do this if the light, to aperture are changed between shots
QuoteQuote:

I forgot to ask what flash support is. Will the flash not turn on if I use an all manual lens, or does it have to do with timing?

Billy Joe, I LOVE that wildflower pic! What macro lens did you use?

Thanks everyone, you're help is very appreciated!
flash support is the set of functions the camera will support for flash control, with any given lens . The *istD series cameras, and not even all of those, are the only ones with dual flash metering, I.e. Both TTL and P-TTL. The older TTL metering uses a separate sensor which reads reflected light off the film in old cameras, or the front of the main image sensor in a digital camera. Since it is reading the actual light, it does not need to know anything abou the lens connected. p-TTL is a predictive flash metering system, using the cameras normal light meter, it uses the known ambient light from the cameras metering, plus a preflash to measure the result of the reflected light from the cameras flash, then calculates the flash duration based upon ambient light and the set aperture and open aperture value to get correct exposure. As a result it needs to know many things from the lens, and non A lenses can't supply this information, so the camera, with non a lenses fires the flash at full power. As a result, for manual lenses, you need to set the aperture manually, based on ISO, the flash power or guide number, and distance, to get correct exposure

QuoteOriginally posted by Lovephotography Quote
Another question I keep forgetting to ask is I live in a humid climate. This year especially there's been fog every morning. Are these lenses safe to use in this weather, or do I need to bite the bullet and stick with just weather resistant? Can I take a non WR lens in fog to take pictures? Obviously I wouldn't take it out in the rain, but I don't know how weather-proof a lens needs to be for it to survive in, for example, fog.
Humidity never stopped photographers before WR. The real issue is letting the temperature of the camera stabilize to the ambient to avoid condensate, and if you get condensate, when finished shooting wipe the lens off with a towel and let things dry with caps off, out before storing them away when finished shooting. Even light mist is not a real issue even for non WR lenses as long as you wipe I off the water occasionally
11-07-2013, 07:09 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
.

Humidity never stopped photographers before WR. The real issue is letting the temperature of the camera stabilize to the ambient to avoid condensate, and if you get condensate, when finished shooting wipe the lens off with a towel and let things dry with caps off, out before storing them away when finished shooting. Even light mist is not a real issue even for non WR lenses as long as you wipe I off the water occasionally
I lost a my first ever zoom lens (a screw mount 50-150) to mould I wouldn't say "never".

11-07-2013, 08:47 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by Just1MoreDave Quote
If the camera doesn't detect a lens it can control, the popup flash will fire at full power. A flash mounted on the hot shoe will fire but is on its own for power and settings - the camera won't try to figure out flash settings. If you want to use flash with older lenses, then, the popup flash is mostly out. But a lot of inexpensive hotshoe-mounted flashes allow you to control their power manually.
I like to use flash at a low power setting to freeze motion, so I have more freedom with shutter speed. I usually use a 90mm macro lens and dial down the flash to a low manual setting. Here is one example. :
So even on a sunny day a controlled flash is handy in macro because it provides light for a faster shutter speed, thus "freezing" the subject in place to get a sharp picture. I can definately see how that would be helpful.

QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
As for focusing, if you do manual focusing you should get a split image viewfinder, because the stock focusing screen is not optimized for fast lenses and it is hard to determine exact focus with the stock screen.
Aperture is not a focusing tool, aperture controls two things on a lens, depth of field, which is the range of acceptable sharpness in an image, and the light as part of the overall exposure control. Faster lenses allow more light when wide open, and also when wide open, less depth of field
I haven't seen anything on DSLRs about a split image viewfinder. I just assumed all DSLRs had it. Is it possible to have one in the K-30? I can't afford a $600 camera, much less a $1,000+ one. That's one of the main reasons I want the K-30 ... the price is affordable.

I know what aperture is now. I didn't years ago, but in my research on cameras and lenses I figured it out.

QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
Originally posted by Lovephotography I'm a she, not a he . Sorry
No sweat, you didn't know. Actually I thought it was kind of funny, but I figured it'd be best to clear it up.

Green light metering = shutter speed, got it. Thanks for clearing that up.

Without flash support I have to be careful to choose the correct ISO, aperture, shutter speed (if not auto), and distance for a good picture (not washed out), is that right?

QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
Humidity never stopped photographers before WR. The real issue is letting the temperature of the camera stabilize to the ambient to avoid condensate, and if you get condensate, when finished shooting wipe the lens off with a towel and let things dry with caps off, out before storing them away when finished shooting. Even light mist is not a real issue even for non WR lenses as long as you wipe I off the water occasionally
QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
I lost a my first ever zoom lens (a screw mount 50-150) to mould I wouldn't say "never".
So humidity shouldn't be a problem if I allow the camera to acclimate to the environment (how do I do this?) and wipe off any and all moisture afterward, or during in the case of a light mist. After I wipe off the lens I should let it completely air dry detached from the camera and without caps to prevent trapped moisture issues (and mold).


Does anyone have an opinion on the Pentax K 100mm f4 Macro lens?
11-07-2013, 12:39 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lovephotography Quote
So even on a sunny day a controlled flash is handy in macro because it provides light for a faster shutter speed, thus "freezing" the subject in place to get a sharp picture. I can definately see how that would be helpful.



I haven't seen anything on DSLRs about a split image viewfinder. I just assumed all DSLRs had it. Is it possible to have one in the K-30? I can't afford a $600 camera, much less a $1,000+ one. That's one of the main reasons I want the K-30 ... the price is affordable.

I know what aperture is now. I didn't years ago, but in my research on cameras and lenses I figured it out.


No sweat, you didn't know. Actually I thought it was kind of funny, but I figured it'd be best to clear it up.

Green light metering = shutter speed, got it. Thanks for clearing that up.

Without flash support I have to be careful to choose the correct ISO, aperture, shutter speed (if not auto), and distance for a good picture (not washed out), is that right?




So humidity shouldn't be a problem if I allow the camera to acclimate to the environment (how do I do this?) and wipe off any and all moisture afterward, or during in the case of a light mist. After I wipe off the lens I should let it completely air dry detached from the camera and without caps to prevent trapped moisture issues (and mold).


Does anyone have an opinion on the Pentax K 100mm f4 Macro lens?
Just a quick reply

For flash, and manual lenses use shutter speed, the camera can't do this in auto with legacy lenses. So you balance he three variables on the camera, plus distance

For focusing screens these are after market, they range from $30 to $130 approximately. I have one for my K10 and my *istD. There are several threads about them and how to change them, it takes about 10 minutes and a pair of tweezers

For humidity and equalization the best way is to go out with your camera in a carrying bag or case, and wait about 1/2 hour for it to reach the outdoor temperature, if it is cooler inside than out, just so you do not get condensate going to a warm humid environment. This is an issue for me in winter, going into greenhouses

As for the K100/4 macro, all macro lenses from Pentax starting with the super takumar, through to the A series are optically the same design, just the lens coatings get better the newer the lenses are. I have the M100/4. It is a good lens, very sharp, the k is almost identical except the K has a 52mm filter ring, the M a 49mm filter (don't ask me why)
11-07-2013, 01:05 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lovephotography Quote

Green light metering = shutter speed, got it. Thanks for clearing that up.
Just to clarify: it's Green Button metering (you know, the green button on the camera!) - also known as stop-down metering.
11-08-2013, 03:14 PM   #23
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Awesome, thanks for your help everyone!

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