Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
11-20-2013, 09:43 AM   #16
Veteran Member
DavidSKAF3's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Tompkins County, NY
Photos: Albums
Posts: 542
Original Poster
Okay, I just took a few shots in Shutter Priority mode. I set white balance to sunshine and ISO to 100. I used AF.C Focus Mode and I tried shutter speeds from 1/60 to 1/500.

One thing I noticed: my Canon T3i (that I am now selling on eBay) used to indicate if I was exposing light or dark or just right. I don't see a similar meter in the K-5 viewfinder. There's a horizon level indicator where the exposure meter would be on the T3i. Is this a feature the K-5 lacks? Or is this some sort of Canon sissy feature I should learn to live without? LOL!

Anyway, below are three sample photos. I gotta say the K-5 seemed to do a lot better today. Of course, today it's much brighter than it was yesterday. Maybe that makes a big difference.

The vehicles in each photo were moving, but not really any faster than 30mph. I am wondering in particular about the second picture of the truck. The truck is in focus, but not the other cars. I wonder why. The other cars were moving too.

Attached Images
View Picture EXIF
PENTAX K-5  Photo 
View Picture EXIF
PENTAX K-5  Photo 
View Picture EXIF
PENTAX K-5  Photo 

Last edited by DavidSKAF3; 11-20-2013 at 09:53 AM. Reason: Grammar
11-20-2013, 09:45 AM   #17
Pentaxian
JinDesu's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: New York City
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 5,626
You need to turn off the horizon level. The level and the AE meter occupy the same spot in the viewfinder.

With regards to the truck picture - are you asking why the truck is in focus, but the surrounding cars in the same image are not in focus?
11-20-2013, 09:54 AM   #18
Veteran Member
DavidSKAF3's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Tompkins County, NY
Photos: Albums
Posts: 542
Original Poster
Yes, I am wondering why the truck and the other cars were all in motion, but only the truck is in focus.

Also would you say these pics are too bright? Seems the highlights are blown out. Especially the white portion of the truck. Do I need a polarizing filter?

Also, I want to say that the color looks more realistic than the color the T3i produced, at least by default. And to me these pictures look pleasingly sharp, too.

Thanks!

Last edited by DavidSKAF3; 11-20-2013 at 10:27 AM.
11-20-2013, 12:22 PM   #19
Pentaxian
JinDesu's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: New York City
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 5,626
QuoteOriginally posted by davids8560 Quote
Yes, I am wondering why the truck and the other cars were all in motion, but only the truck is in focus.

Also would you say these pics are too bright? Seems the highlights are blown out. Especially the white portion of the truck. Do I need a polarizing filter?

Also, I want to say that the color looks more realistic than the color the T3i produced, at least by default. And to me these pictures look pleasingly sharp, too.

Thanks!
Well technically there's two kinds of blur in that photo - and let me explain a few things:

Motion blur is blur introduced when an object is moving too fast for your shutter speed to capture. This blur is distinct in that you see your object "blur" in a direction. For example, the parked car on the left shows motion blur (there appears to be somewhat of a double image - look at the bumper). Similarly the parked SUV in the right rear of the image shows motion blur (it looks like a double image). These parked cars have motion blur because you were moving your lens to keep track of the truck - so that's why the truck looks mostly sharp.

The red car on the right in the foreground shows both motion blur AND out-of-focus blur. The motion blur is clear in the back wheel - there's a double image there. The OOF blur is shown in the fact that nothing on the car is "sharp".

Look at your third image - the top of the car on the lower right side, that is FOCUS blur. You can see that it is just soft and blurry, but there is no double image or sense of motion. It is a little hard for me to describe, but you can try experimenting either scenario to get a better understanding.

Test#1 - Ask a friend to stand in your front yard. Focus on an object far behind him. He will be out of focus - that is OOF blur.

Test#2 - Ask a friend to stand in your front yard and set your shutter speed at 1/25s. Focus on your friend and ask him to jump up and down (but not move towards or away from you). Once you take the picture, your friend will be blurred by motion - but your front yard at his location will be sharp and not blurred.

In your first shot of the white car/silver car - yes, the side is blown out (overexposed).
In your second shot of the truck, my monitor is showing that the truck is very bright, but not blown out.
In the third shot, there are several bright elements, but I don't think anything is blown out.

Are you still shooting jpeg? Have you tried turning on Highlight Compensation? A polarizing filter will not really help in all cases - if you are shooting in program/auto mode I can't help too much because I don't shoot in auto - but turning on Highlight Compensation could give you some leeway with high contrast scenes like these.

Basically, where you have bright sunlight, white colour subjects, and shadows - jpeg shooting will usually have to give up something, either the shadows or the white objects.

11-20-2013, 12:40 PM   #20
Veteran Member
DavidSKAF3's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Tompkins County, NY
Photos: Albums
Posts: 542
Original Poster
Thanks again for your helpful comments!

The last three shots were taken in Shutter Priority Mode. And yes they are jpegs.
11-20-2013, 12:50 PM   #21
Pentaxian
JinDesu's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: New York City
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 5,626
Ah, I see - I should have checked the exif notes.

In Av, TAv, and Sv mode, you should be able to dial down the exposure by pressing the +/- button and turning the dial down. That can definitely help with regards to keeping bright subjects from being blown out.

With regards to dynamic range - jpegs have much smaller dynamic range than RAW files. In jpeg, I believe the k-5/k-30 sensor will produce 11ev of DR. In RAW, that can go up to 14EV. This means that in RAW files, you can recover the blown highlights (to some degree) and the dark shadows - but with a JPEG image you will have limited ability to fix the blown highlights or dark shadows. So with shooting jpeg, you will want to make sure your Highlight Correction and Shadow Correction are on, and you may want to adjust your shooting style to avoid having extreme contrast subjects in the same frame (there will be times when you can't avoid it, however - like a person in a tuxedo or a penguin). The jpeg corrections in the camera will do its best to give you the maximum dynamic range it can achieve.
11-20-2013, 01:52 PM   #22
Loyal Site Supporter
TER-OR's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Dundee, IL
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,834
With the truck you have essentially a panning shot - following a moving subject. The DOF will give focus for the subject and other things in that plane, everything out of plane, or in relative motion will be out of focus. There's an art to fast panning, and a lot of variables to keep track of.

Do try TAv mode - front wheel is shutter speed, back wheel is aperture. Keep your ISO where you're comfortable - often I dial in an aperture where I'm comfortable like f8 or f11, then adjust shutter speed to keep ISO in a good range.

Colors - I think the T series cameras have what we call a "vibrant" jpg setting. I don't like that, I tried it in my K5 and put it back to neutral.
11-21-2013, 07:44 AM   #23
Site Supporter
Ahab's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Oracle, Az
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 739
Have you considered taking a photography coarse? I did and came away with a better grasp of the basics.

11-21-2013, 08:28 AM   #24
Veteran Member
DavidSKAF3's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Tompkins County, NY
Photos: Albums
Posts: 542
Original Poster
Well, here's the thing. I've had some experience with compacts. But with the DSLRs, it appears that, and I don't know if this will make any sense, the adjustments and effects of various settings are more dramatic.!its a lot more easy to blow a shot or at least get a result you didn't expect or intend.
11-21-2013, 12:10 PM   #25
Loyal Site Supporter
TER-OR's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Dundee, IL
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,834
Using the camera in 'green mode' is like shooting a big P&S in automatic.

Seriously, try TAV, set your aperture and vary your shutter speed to get ISO in an acceptable range. The ISO will tell you if you're getting close to under or overexposure.
You have an immensely powerful tool in your hands, you need to start learning how to get the most out of it. A lot of us grew up using fully manual cameras, so the settings are second nature to us. It's much more difficult going from a pocket camera to DSLR, even though the P&S cameras have loads of tools people frequently ignore...
11-21-2013, 12:49 PM   #26
Veteran Member
DavidSKAF3's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Tompkins County, NY
Photos: Albums
Posts: 542
Original Poster
Thank you for your reply!

Last edited by DavidSKAF3; 11-22-2013 at 04:17 AM.
11-21-2013, 02:23 PM   #27
Loyal Site Supporter
TER-OR's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Dundee, IL
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,834
The K5 is a much more "serious" camera than the others in that group. I was drawn to Pentax for the easy manual controls. I find the dual-wheel TAv is closest to old-school photographic controls where you'd use aperture and shutter speed to get the right exposure for the ISO of your film. The only difference now is you choose the ISO for any scene.

You'll get the feel for it - it's well worth the time.
11-21-2013, 02:44 PM   #28
Veteran Member
DavidSKAF3's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Tompkins County, NY
Photos: Albums
Posts: 542
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by TER-OR Quote
The K5 is a much more "serious" camera than the others in that group. I was drawn to Pentax for the easy manual controls. I find the dual-wheel TAv is closest to old-school photographic controls where you'd use aperture and shutter speed to get the right exposure for the ISO of your film. The only difference now is you choose the ISO for any scene.

You'll get the feel for it - it's well worth the time.
TAv, it is then!

Time for work. Ho hum.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, flash, focus, k-5, k-5 af, pentax help, photography, truck
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Some questions about K-5 basikal_kusayang Pentax K-5 8 11-19-2012 11:23 PM
K-30 vs K-5 SPECIFIC questions intjonmiller Pentax K-30 & K-50 10 08-02-2012 07:53 PM
Newb K-5 Questions... Observations. Omestes Pentax K-5 5 03-30-2012 02:03 PM
new K-5 user questions bonjonno Pentax K-5 7 02-09-2012 02:40 PM
K-5 AF questions... mxlinn Pentax K-5 16 12-21-2011 07:37 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:54 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top