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06-22-2014, 10:23 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Don't squirt it into the camera!!! It can cause local damage to focus screens, mirrors, and other stuff as well as drive dust into the inner workings.
+1 - never, EVER use compressed air inside a camera! The propellant leaves a nasty, oily film, and the force can blow a hole right through the shutter (I saw someone do that to a Nikon N90).

06-23-2014, 03:13 AM   #17
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Unless your blower has a filter at the air inlet you blow more dust into the camera then you would ever hope to blow out of it. If you think you will be blowing out of the camera mount opening any significant amount of dust you are kidding yourself. Once the dust is floated on the turbulent air from the blower you have no control over it, it goes where it wants to go not where you want it to go.

Your blower is a very efficient dust cannon.

You have seen the dust floating in a shaft of sunlight that shines through the window, haven't you ? That's what you are blowing into your camera. Don't do it !

And don't blow the mount end of a zoom lens, O.K. let's repeat this, don't blow the mount end of a zoom lens ! Why you ask ? You will blow dirt and dust through the gaps of the movable barrels and once in there ... well you know what it looks like don't you. Use a soft lens brush instead.

But do blow the inside of the rear lens cap before putting it back on to the lens. (a sharp blow from your lungs will do) The plastic cap gets statically charged and attracts dust (especially when you put it in your pocket) which is easily transferred on to the lens and that's when the trouble starts.

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06-23-2014, 04:32 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by OregonJim Quote
+1 - never, EVER use compressed air inside a camera! The propellant leaves a nasty, oily film, and the force can blow a hole right through the shutter (I saw someone do that to a Nikon N90).
I did not have time yet If the blower just activate the dust cloud inside the camera, if the canned air will destroy the camera, how professional technicians clean the camera inside?

---------- Post added 06-23-14 at 04:33 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Schraubstock Quote
And don't blow the mount end of a zoom lens, O.K. let's repeat this, don't blow the mount end of a zoom lens ! Why you ask ? You will blow dirt and dust through the gaps of the movable barrels and once in there ... well you know what it looks like don't you. Use a soft lens brush instead.
Too late, I had no idea. Never again.
Actually, I did not find that blower is effective for cleaning lens dust. I mean it blows away some dust, but I don't get the purpose of blowing if brush is more effective. Lenses are not that fragile, they can handle the soft brush without problem. There are some tutorials keep repeating, be careful with coating. If little dust can scratch the coating, that's very fake coating, imo.
Also, charging the brush with blower is annoying I can get generate more static electricity with hair dryer instead.

Last edited by micromacro; 06-23-2014 at 04:56 AM.
06-23-2014, 08:12 AM   #19
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I've tried hair dryer (away from the camera) on cleaning brush. That's some serious charging! It took two brush charges to pick up all the visible dirt inside the camera. I should have done that before instead of blower! It works on lenses as a charm as well.
As for sensor, I will clean it later.

06-23-2014, 08:21 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by micromacro Quote
I've tried hair dryer (away from the camera) on cleaning brush. That's some serious charging! It took two brush charges to pick up all the visible dirt inside the camera.
Very cool! I seldom have much of a dust problem, but will remember this trick.


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06-23-2014, 08:38 AM   #21
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Steve, hair dryer also does not leave any chance for picked dust to stay on brush
I used it also for cleaning rear part of macro lens. Nice!
06-23-2014, 05:32 PM   #22
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QuoteQuote:
I used it also for cleaning rear part of macro lens
Which macro ??
Some ( Pentax m100/f4 for instance) have flocking within for reflection control... it migrates like mad to DSLR sensors.

https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/120-general-technical-troubleshooting/253...o-m100-f4.html

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/2549384
06-23-2014, 05:50 PM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by bobD Quote
Which macro ??
Some ( Pentax m100/f4 for instance) have flocking within for reflection control... it migrates like mad to DSLR sensors.
Yep, that's the one. Mine came in pretty good condition, and yes, it was dust on flocking I have not noticed without the flash light first. It seems like well charged brush got the most of that. At least I have not seen any dust with magnifier after the cleaning. There is some dust inside the lens however, not much, and have not affected the image.

06-23-2014, 05:51 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by micromacro Quote
I've tried hair dryer (away from the camera) on cleaning brush. That's some serious charging! It took two brush charges to pick up all the visible dirt inside the camera. I should have done that before instead of blower! It works on lenses as a charm as well.
As for sensor, I will clean it later.
Interesting idea! When you do the sensor, charge the brush, then do only ONE swipe with the brush. Remove brush, blow off dust, recharge, do again if necessary. Also, keep the brush away from the very edges of the sensor - there is lubricant there which you could smear on the sensor.
06-23-2014, 06:36 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by OregonJim Quote
Also, keep the brush away from the very edges of the sensor - there is lubricant there which you could smear on the sensor.
For the sensor I will use another brush. The brush which came with lens cleaning set is not the best quality, imo.
Btw, make up brushes, not cheap ones, would be an ideal for sensor cleaning. Unfortunately all my brushes are in use, need a new one.
So, guys, check the closest Sephora for sensor cleaning brushes.
06-23-2014, 08:14 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by patrick9 Quote
I never change lenses out in the open especially if windy I did it once never again.
So what do you do, go home change lens, go back take photo, go home put first lens back again...

Or do you knock on someones door; Excuse me sir/madam may I just come in to change this lens on my camera...

(Please note: the above is a tongue in cheek comment)

Do you mean to say you rather not take a certain photograph because you are afraid to change lenses ? Makes no sense to have an exchangeable lens camera then, is it.

What is it about a camera sensor that strikes so much fear in you.

Granted, it is a delicate little thing and a marvel of technical achievement but the way it is packaged and sits in your camera it is remarkable robust and under normal treatment almost impossible to destroy.

So what is normal treatment ? Wiping it, swiping it, brushing it, stabbing it with the sticky lollypop cleaner, washing it, and doing all this with approved utensils designed for this job.

Do you thing PENTAX or any other camera manufacturer would put on the marked a camera where the sensor is so vulnerable it will be damaged by a simple cleaning activity. Consider the fact that they have figured out by now that this user serviceable part of the camera has to withstand servicing, (cleaning) by you or service and repair people. And the people who work in service/repair shops are just people like you and me. Sure they are (hopefully) trained in this activity but if they can be trained so can you.

So go on, change your lens and take that shot. Do it quickly and carefully by all means and if the odds are against you in a particular environment and you find a bit of crap on the sensor, when you get home clean it off in the knowledge that it is really quite hard to ruin the little bugger unless you take a hammer and chisel to it.

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06-24-2014, 05:30 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by Schraubstock Quote
So what do you do, go home change lens, go back take photo, go home put first lens back again...
Or do you knock on someones door; Excuse me sir/madam may I just come in to change this lens on my camera...
Actually, I've never needed to change lenses outdoor yet. Going out I plan what lens I'd like to shoot with that time. Is not a pain to carry a bunch of lenses going to the park for an hour or two? For the trips involving flying I take one extra lens, but change lenses in the hotel before going out. So, it is always indoor changing.


QuoteQuote:
What is it about a camera sensor that strikes so much fear in you.
Oh, let me explain It's not a fear, it's a google search. Lets google "how to clean sensor". Enjoy!

QuoteQuote:
1.Digital camera sensor cleaning, if you will excuse the pun, is a “sensitive” matter. It requires patience and understanding of the delicate nature of the sensor itself.
2.you attempt any of this AT YOUR OWN RISK (as is on site, bold and capslock)

3.
Warning: dust-spotting your Canon camera’s sensor requires a gentle touch and the right equipment.
first random quotes. I've read tons of "warnings", then finally got tired of all that "warning" drama, opened the manual, and just cleaned damn sensor. How do you think a person, who has never seen a sensor should read all that?
It is still a sensitive matter, but not THAT sensitive.

QuoteQuote:
Do you thing PENTAX or any other camera manufacturer would put on the marked a camera where the sensor is so vulnerable it will be damaged by a simple cleaning activity.
No, I don't. However, it's like a car cleaning: first I better to get rid of harsh dirt particles which may scratch the shiny new car surface. And if I do have a bad habit not to get rid of tiny particles first, eventually it will be more and more scratches.

I also think you missed the initial point of this thread. I don't want to clean sensor every time I'm taking a camera out. It's not normal, unless manufactures meant it to be normal So, I tried to investigate why one of my camera which bought brand new has no issue with dirty sensor at all, and another second hand camera gets dirty sensor basically right after cleaning. I'm sick of removing spots in lightroom over and over.
06-24-2014, 08:45 AM   #28
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micromacro, what are the lenses you are running on that camera?

Are you running old zooms that are push-pull or one-touch?
Those lenses that have a trombone action or a large mid-group carrier act like air pumps and could throw around air inside.
That sort of thing happen to me while I was running an old M80-200 lens of a few days in a row.
06-24-2014, 09:16 AM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by MysteryOnion Quote
Are you running old zooms that are push-pull or one-touch?
Those lenses that have a trombone action or a large mid-group carrier act like air pumps and could throw around air inside.
That sort of thing happen to me while I was running an old M80-200 lens of a few days in a row.
I do use a few "trombone" lenses on Pentax. I use Pentax with old lenses only because I did not buy modern lens yet for it.
Recently I've tried old push-pull lenses on new Canon, first time ever. And yes! I have noticed some dust inside the camera, not on sensor. First time ever, right after using old lenses. Most likely that's the reason. Good to know, thanks!
06-24-2014, 10:43 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by MysteryOnion Quote
micromacro, what are the lenses you are running on that camera?
Further up the thread it was revealed that micromacro has been using a Pentax-M 100/f4 macro that is suffering from the degenerative flocking problem common with that lens. It is a likely source of a lot of the dirt. IIRC, the fix is to disassemble and physically remove the flocking followed by application of flat black paint.


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