Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
10-18-2014, 12:37 PM   #16
Pentaxian
Na Horuk's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Slovenia, probably
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 10,865
You can also compare your results to photos in the sample photo gallery:
Pentax Camera & Lens Sample Photo Search Engine - PentaxForums.com

But a lot of these photos are highly processed, so you won't get the same results straight out of the camera

10-18-2014, 12:38 PM   #17
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Tumbleweed, Arizona
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,107
First of all you are suffering from the transition from P&S to SLR. You are just not going to be able to pick up the body and go shooting away, expecting perfect images every frame. It just does not happen that quickly - whether or not you are a fast learner or not. There are a lot of things at play here, and it is their interactions that matter the most.

When you post images, they really need to contain the EXIF data - just not you listing the ISO, aperture and shutter speed. The rest of the data does matter. Download a copy of PhotoMe to see what else it contains.
  • By shooting with a wide open aperture, your depth of field will be very shallow/thin.
  • By shooting with a high ISO your image may have more noise that desired.
  • By shooting with a slower shutter speed, you may be introducing camera blur into the image. Do you have SR turned on?
You need to go look at the resolution section to determine the best aperture to shoot at - for absolute best sharpness, in particular across the entire lens.Your lenses may be front or back focusing. The K5 body provides the ability to adjust via the fine focusing for up to 20 individual separate lenses.

Lots of other things to consider also.

10-18-2014, 12:43 PM   #18
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Far North Qld
Posts: 3,294
Aside from all the good advice here, one thing that improved my keeper rate was to DISABLE SR. I honestly find that sticking to correct Apertures and shutter speeds gives me better results than relying on SR to 'help' me out. SR can actually make things softer in my experience. The only time I use SR is when I absolutely need to, which is rare.
10-18-2014, 01:42 PM   #19
Veteran Member
VisualDarkness's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Uppsala, Sweden
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 4,441
On the pic of the horse the focus is perfect on the straws of grass in front of the grass, not the horse behind them. My guess is that the camera focused of the grass instead of the horse you wanted to focus on.

---------- Post added 10-18-14 at 10:43 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Steve.Ledger Quote
Aside from all the good advice here, one thing that improved my keeper rate was to DISABLE SR. I honestly find that sticking to correct Apertures and shutter speeds gives me better results than relying on SR to 'help' me out. SR can actually make things softer in my experience. The only time I use SR is when I absolutely need to, which is rare.
Really? I often get bummed when looking at pics I've shot with non-SR cameras up to pretty high shutter speeds, I've never seen degredation.

10-18-2014, 01:52 PM   #20
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Far North Qld
Posts: 3,294
QuoteOriginally posted by VisualDarkness Quote
Really?
Yep, really..
10-18-2014, 01:54 PM   #21
Veteran Member
VisualDarkness's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Uppsala, Sweden
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 4,441
Also, the 70/2.4 i really sharp already wide-open so you should not need to stop down for sharpness, though the depth of field (depth of focus) is pretty short at F2.4.
10-18-2014, 02:31 PM   #22
Pentaxian




Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: NY
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,392
Suggestion

Hi,

This is just a general description of some of the things I do that you might be interested in and that might help you test. I definitely vary from them for different shooting, but I wanted to just mention them.

What I usually do when I take photographs of perching birds is set my mode dial to TAV. I then set my exposure time to 250 and F Stop to F10 which can vary depending on how specific I want to get. This is taking into consideration that I am outdoors and it is not a dark day, if it is you could maybe go to F8 or F7. The 250 allows me to catch some of the slight movement of the birds or myself and the F10 allows me a good depth of field giving me some substance to the picture. The ISO in this mode is set automatically by the camera so I do not have to adjust it. It is obvious that you are not going to be able to try every type of setting with your camera at once, so if you are looking to do some simple test shooting you might want to try what I am referring to. In reference to shooting inside, if you do not have a flash other than the on camera flash, you might want to just try the on camera flash with the mode dial set to green mode to get an idea of what the camera uses for settings when you are indoors. I have the K5 and it is going to give you very nice results if settings are used that accommodate it. After you get more experience using the different modes of the camera, you might want to use TAV as I do outdoors, or if you are inside get one of the Pentax flashes to shoot more distance and use the camera in manual mode to find out all the settings which best suit what you want when you use the flash head. You do not have to go to F4 or F3 to get nice shots indoors with a flash head or lighting as it provides the light you need. You could choose to, but you do not necessarily have to.

Of course this is just some advice. There are numbers of different ways that you can set up your camera for many types of different circumstances you may encounter. I just wanted to give you a general idea of what might help your early use of the K-5. I have had two of them and I also have a K-5IIs. The K-5 provided me with excellent images indoors, outdoors (moving and not moving) with the on board flash, with a flash head, and with a flash head, indoor lighting and backdrop.

I wish you good luck, and if you are like me you will probably learn via trial and error, your manual, and some occasional advice how to do different things with your K-5 which is a very nice and highly rated camera.

Have a good day and I hope you enjoy yourself.
10-18-2014, 03:39 PM   #23
Pentaxian




Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: NY
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,392
Something Else

Just a couple of other things I wanted to mention. If you are getting shots of subjects like birds and individuals and you want the focus to be on the subject in the center of your viewfinder I would suggest that you adjust the AF point switch on the back of your camera to the one with the dot in the center of the rectangle (uppermost one). Also if you want continuous focus, you may want to set the focus mode (switch on the outside of your camera) to "C". These are suggestions I have used successfully in case you are interested. They may help you in the way that you can expect to get the focus on what is in the center of your viewfinder and getting it continuously when you press your shutter button halfway down.


Last edited by C_Jones; 10-18-2014 at 03:41 PM. Reason: small typos
10-18-2014, 04:40 PM   #24
Pentaxian
Just1MoreDave's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Aurora, CO
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 4,862
QuoteOriginally posted by Nephus Quote
I am quite young so I have a relatively steady hand .
You can test this to see if it's really true. A subject with lots of small bright highlights is good - Christmas lights, distant street lights, something stable and small. Tv mode is pretty good for this; you can keep choosing a lower shutter speed while looking through the viewfinder. You won't be perfect every time but you can get an idea of a hit rate at slow shutter speeds. Motion blur in the small highlights is really obvious on a computer. Then you'll know where to push shutter speed later.
10-19-2014, 05:51 AM   #25
New Member




Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 15
Original Poster
QuoteQuote:
Select manual focus, and put the lens' focus to somewhere near minimum, but not at total minimum. Now grab a magazine or newspaper and place it at 45 degree into your focus area. If your lens has distance scales, you can use a measuring tape (beware, distance scales measure from the sensor to the subject, not from the front of the lens to the subject).

Could you explain this more carefully?


This is propably not what you mean?


http://oi61.tinypic.com/2djnl94.jpg
10-19-2014, 06:03 AM   #26
Pentaxian
LensBeginner's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Photos: Albums
Posts: 2,607
QuoteOriginally posted by Nephus Quote
Could you explain this more carefully?


This is propably not what you mean?


http://oi61.tinypic.com/2djnl94.jpg
He means placing it so the top of the newspaper is more distant than the base.
That way, not all of it will be in focus at a given time and you can measure the distance of the plane of focus.
10-19-2014, 11:52 AM   #27
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Chicago suburb, IL, USA
Posts: 1,535
Hi Nephus,

Sharp images . . . of course technique is important, but I think first, you need to find a base line that your gear is capable of producing, then go from there. You don't seen to have a lot of confidence in what your new camera/lenses are capable of. Once you've established that, you can go forward from there. . .

My suggestion is to first shoot a new body and/or lenses with the pop up flash. The very short flash duration eliminates camera shake and will equalize the exposure for most of the shots. You can use exposure comp and/or flash comp to get comparable exposures at the extremes of the aperture range. Pick a subject with fine detail or texture. Shoot at base ISO, M mode, 1/180 shutter and at different apertures. I'd suggest using a tripod so you can more easily use Live View to focus manually to eliminate any AF errors. Turn SR off to eliminate this as a possible source of error.

For this, forget about artistic lighting, composition, or dislike of the harshness of direct flash lighting, or differences between shooting RAW and jpeg. Your goal is to establish a baseline of sharpness that the gear is capable of in a best case scenario.

Once you've established what the camera/lens is capable of, then you can compare your results in the field and get a better handle on what you'll need to do to improve technique. . . and like it or not, almost everyone's images can benefit from better technique.

Scott
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
bought, camera, da, exif, focus, format, grass, horse, iso, none, objects, pentax help, photography, pictures, post, sharpness, shutter, speeds, sr, terms, test, troubleshooting
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
K-3 vs K5 iis sharpness peterjcb Pentax DSLR Discussion 16 08-09-2014 02:39 AM
Lens Sharpness vs Sharpness in PP DavidSKAF3 Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 7 11-17-2013 04:18 AM
Sharpness and fine sharpness settings Altglas Pentax Q 7 08-03-2013 01:39 PM
Sharpness worry with the K5 18-135 Rampage2k5 Photographic Industry and Professionals 14 04-12-2013 10:38 AM
Macro 645 A* 120/4 on K5 - amazing sharpness... igor Post Your Photos! 15 11-25-2011 03:47 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:54 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top