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06-01-2015, 01:18 PM   #16
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I'm going to second where JeffB was coming from...

Sunshine7913, you will generally get pretty good results from using the digital or sunny16 rules. but not all lighting is the same. You can use a spot and meter the subject and the highlights and shadow and determine where you want the exposure to be. Or you can meter with the digital and adjust the exposure depending on how it is weighted/averaged, a backlit scene is a perfect example, you would get a reading and then adjust to over expose the subject so they are properly exposed. But to be honest it wil become second nature pretty quickly on when to over or under expose 2/3 or a whole stop (or what ever it may be) It really comes down to personal preference and what you find to work better for you.

06-01-2015, 02:02 PM   #17
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I use my K-3 to meter for various older film cameras (Vito B, Bessa RF, Leicaflex, etc). Works pretty well!
You can also chimp on the digital and then use the settings you prefer on the film camera.
06-01-2015, 02:23 PM   #18
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I use my hand-held Gossen or Sekonic to meter for my K-3 sometimes, though usually it works just as well to chimp/adjust/chimp


Steve
06-01-2015, 02:43 PM   #19
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I'd say use a light meter. It's smaller, lighter, and easier to carry around with you instead of adding the weight of a DSLR with you all the time.

06-02-2015, 05:10 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by disconnekt Quote
I'd say use a light meter. It's smaller, lighter, and easier to carry around with you instead of adding the weight of a DSLR with you all the time.
Very true...and he's got a dang good meter, but he said he was going to carry both cameras all the time. At that point, the meter becomes extra baggage. eh...if it were me, I'd urge him to take the 6X7 and light meter and go explore!
06-02-2015, 08:00 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
I use my hand-held Gossen or Sekonic to meter for my K-3 sometimes, though usually it works just as well to chimp/adjust/chimp
Steve
Either of those meters is excellent, although I tend to lean toward the long gone Pentax spot meter.

What I have begun to do for tricky metering situations is use the spot meter function on my K10D (and on my not too far ahead K-3) and use a modified Zone System I read about somewhere. Choose the darkest (or brightest) part of the image in which I wish to retain detail. Meter that with the "spot" meter in the camera (spot is in quotes because it's really a tight centre weight meter) and for dark area choice add two stops, for bright, subtract two stops. Chimp at the metered area at maximum magnification and adjust slightly if necessary, given time to take another image. As I shoot in RAW I have another stop or so of latitude compared to the LCD chimped JPEG image.

I also know how to take 5 exposures 1 stop apart and do it the complicated way using Photomatix, after offsetting the exposures toward the light or dark areas. This gives me something (bright example) like -1, 0, +1, +2 and +3 to pick and choose the source images from. Often I find that one of those is close enough for Lightroom to bring back.
06-02-2015, 11:26 PM   #22
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well recently, I learned some techniques from a photographers who used pentax 67. They told me to meter for the shadow in order to overexpose film. Overexposing doesn't mean brighter they said. So I should bring spot meter or 5d mark 2 with spot meter I guess
06-03-2015, 08:03 AM   #23
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[RANT] Over expose film within limits of at most 1 stop, for negative film. Those who criticize Pentax metering because it is "always half a stop underexposed" (which includes 90% of the photo magazine tests) have never shot Kodachrome 10 or 25. stop over and the slide loses all the highlight detail. stop under, and the slide is still usable, particularly when you use a good quality projector in a slightly darkened room. The detail is there, and the human eye can handle stop dark all by itself if you turn the room lights down when you turn the projector on.

I recall a test by one of those photo magazines on how accurate the metering was for a number of cameras, including my SF-1 or the PZ-1, I forget which. The Canon took top marks. The Pentax was criticized for consistent stop underexposure. The Canon's exposure system was over stop as often as it was under. With slides, that means 1 full stop difference from slide 16 to slide 17. The only exposure by the Pentax that was not half a stop underexposed was a backlight situation that none of the cameras got right.

With the exception of the one backlit test situation, one could easily set the Pentax to stop over on the meter and be perfect within an eighth of a stop across the board. The backlit test can be metered properly simply by using the spot meter mode, or stepping close, metering and stepping back.

I expose with my K10D to slide rules. Yes, I have to increase exposure in post for most of my images by - guess what: stop - before displaying or printing. But often enough that stop would ruin my images with blown out highlights, I am delighted to not adjust that particular image.
[/RANT]

06-03-2015, 09:30 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
I expose with my K10D to slide rules.
Yep...Digital has an absolute cut off at both the bright and dark end of things. White clipping is simply that and is strictly analogous to overexposing slides. With a slide, the clear emulsion (white) cannot be made more clear. Expose to the right (ETTR) is a good goal, but requires a thorough analysis of the brightness range of the subject before making the exposure. After all, you only have 14 steps for each of the three colors and any allowances made for shadow may result in a failure in the highlights.


Steve

Last edited by stevebrot; 06-03-2015 at 09:36 AM.
06-13-2015, 10:12 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by Oldbayrunner Quote
Agreed, but even back then there were reflective and incident meters being used. Heck even today there are apps that can utilize one's smart phone as a reflective light meter.
That's true. I often use LxMeter on my Android phone. It is a free app with incident/reflective/spot/flash meter support :-)
06-16-2015, 10:45 AM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by Armand Quote
That's true. I often use LxMeter on my Android phone. It is a free app with incident/reflective/spot/flash meter support :-)
Welcome to the Pentax Forums!

I have had poor luck with phone-based meters, but just got a new phone and may give this one a try.


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06-21-2015, 07:33 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by Armand Quote
That's true. I often use LxMeter on my Android phone. It is a free app with incident/reflective/spot/flash meter support :-)
A most ambitious reference for any meter indeed but a 30 second exposure time is a little short of what the Pentax LX can achieve . . .
06-21-2015, 08:02 PM   #28
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I cannot think of any other TTL meter that can handle 125 seconds. The LX was and is a "something else" camera.
06-22-2015, 10:38 AM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
I cannot think of any other TTL meter that can handle 125 seconds. The LX was and is a "something else" camera.
And even that is for OOF measurements in Av mode only (spec'ed at EV(100) -6.5-20). In metered manual mode, the meter sensitivity is the more pedestrian EV(100) 1-19 typical for the base sensitivity of its SPD meter cell. The viewfinder display simply showed "LT, B" below EV(100) 1. The LX IDM system is quite the technical accomplishment and I have found the mir.com.my site to be a hugely useful resource as to how the metering system integrates with the camera operation. (The user manual is...well...meh...)

Pentax LX - How does its metering works


Steve
06-25-2015, 01:39 PM   #30
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A spotmeter will give great results as long as you point it at the right part of the subject. It's the judgement of the photographer that is crucial. Some spotmeters have an incident light capability which is easier to use.
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