Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
06-14-2015, 09:38 AM   #1
New Member




Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 6
Cleaned my Pentax's mirror with a regular Lenspen...

Hey guys! So I will probably ask series of very dumb questions but I am a beginner so bear with me (please).

I have recently cleaned my K-3's mirror with a regular Lenspen (originally intended for lens cleaning). The Lenspen I own has got a dry dust removal brush and a carbon cleaning tip so basically, I tried to remove dust with the brush and then used the carbon tip. Having read some threads on here, I realized this was completely unnecessary (and dumb) so the question is - what possible damage could such cleaning cause? Could the mirror be scratched by the brush, or could there be some carbon leftovers in there? Could something migrate from the mirror to the sensor?

Thank you so much, and so sorry for such dumb questions

06-14-2015, 09:48 AM   #2
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 5,002
I never use the brush side of lenspens -- they tend to add as much dust as they remove and sometimes the bristles fall out. The carbon side should not damage your mirror (not from itself, anyway, you have to be careful about the pressure you are applying), but they also will leave a bit of residue, which will blow off, but only after it dries. (There is just the tiniest bit of inherent moisture [or something] from the lenspen -- its carbon dust will blow off, but it has to sit a while first.)
06-14-2015, 10:39 AM   #3
Senior Member




Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: West Java, Indonesia
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 142
QuoteOriginally posted by bonfireheart Quote
Hey guys! So I will probably ask series of very dumb questions but I am a beginner so bear with me (please).

I have recently cleaned my K-3's mirror with a regular Lenspen (originally intended for lens cleaning). The Lenspen I own has got a dry dust removal brush and a carbon cleaning tip so basically, I tried to remove dust with the brush and then used the carbon tip. Having read some threads on here, I realized this was completely unnecessary (and dumb) so the question is - what possible damage could such cleaning cause? Could the mirror be scratched by the brush, or could there be some carbon leftovers in there? Could something migrate from the mirror to the sensor?

Thank you so much, and so sorry for such dumb questions
Yup, may be you can make scratch the mirror by the brush, but if you brush lightly look like it's not a problem, i usually use blower and than lens cloth to clean the mirror
PS: don;t try to clean view finder with lens pen, it could scratch your view finder and make it like foggy and make hard to see
06-14-2015, 11:55 AM   #4
Site Supporter
Spodeworld's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: New Joisey
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,240
Best not to touch the mirror with anything. Easiest thing to damage in the camera

06-14-2015, 12:04 PM   #5
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 5,002
QuoteOriginally posted by Spodeworld Quote
Best not to touch the mirror with anything. Easiest thing to damage in the camera
The focusing screen is even easier to damage!
06-14-2015, 12:05 PM   #6
New Member




Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 6
Original Poster
Thank you all SO much for your answers. How do I know if I damaged or scratched the mirror though?
06-14-2015, 12:17 PM   #7
Pentaxian
Na Horuk's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Slovenia, probably
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 10,872
Eh, if it was damaged, you would know. There would be marks when you look through the viewfinder (since the viewfinder shows the mirror). So if you see spots in the viewfinder, they could be on the mirror. Or focusing screen, or on the pentaprism.
I wouldn't worry about it until I actually notice damage, but I wouldn't repeat that "cleaning", either. For inside the camera, the best thing to use is a rocket blower, because it is just air pressure. But! Even this thing has to be clean, or you are just blowing dust on there.
06-14-2015, 12:39 PM   #8
New Member




Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 6
Original Poster
Yeah, I won't touch the mirror again. It's just I have some incredibly annoying spots on my photos (have a look at an image I attached) and I assumed they were over the mirror because I found lots of dust over it. And so I "cleaned" it. But, I guess the actual problem is sensor dust.

Attached Images
View Picture EXIF
PENTAX K-3  Photo 
06-14-2015, 12:40 PM   #9
New Member




Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 6
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by vonBaloney Quote
I never use the brush side of lenspens -- they tend to add as much dust as they remove and sometimes the bristles fall out. The carbon side should not damage your mirror (not from itself, anyway, you have to be careful about the pressure you are applying), but they also will leave a bit of residue, which will blow off, but only after it dries. (There is just the tiniest bit of inherent moisture [or something] from the lenspen -- its carbon dust will blow off, but it has to sit a while first.)
Any chance some of that carbon could get inside the sensor?
06-14-2015, 01:58 PM   #10
Veteran Member




Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Huntsville, Alabama
Posts: 422
Definitely the sensor. Have you tried the dust removal function on the camera?

Do you have automatic dust removal enabled?

Try pointing the camera vertically down and then use the dust removal function multiple times in a row.

If the dust removal function doesn't help, then it needs to be serviced.

How exactly does one get a lot of dust on the mirror or anything else inside the body in the first place?
06-14-2015, 02:19 PM   #11
Pentaxian
Na Horuk's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Slovenia, probably
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 10,872
QuoteOriginally posted by bonfireheart Quote
It's just I have some incredibly annoying spots on my photos (have a look at an image I attached) and I assumed they were over the mirror because I found lots of dust over it.
Nope! The mirror does not affect the photo! You can have a mirror sprayed with red paint and it will not affect the image, as long as the mirror moves out of the way correctly.
You see, when a shot is taken, the mirror moves out of the way, then the shutter courtain opens, exposing the sensor for the shutter speed number, and then the shutter closes and the mirror closes after it.
Those spots you see are dust spots on the actual sensor. You can turn on the dust removal function in the camera (many people set it up to automatically do that on shut down. These options are in the Menu, feel free to check the manual).
The other thing you can do is use the sensor cleaning function and use a rocket blower to blow off the dust, being careful not to actually touch the sensor. There are many threads and tutorials about sensor cleaning btw, just search these forums or the net. There are other tools for sensor cleaning, but the air blower should be enough to begin. Some shops offer this as a service. In some countries you even get a free sensor cleaning as part of the warranty (or extended warranty).

Edit: One more thing. Similar spots can be caused by dust on the back of the lens, but that is more rare. Anyway, you can check that as well, but be careful, as the back of the lens is more sensitive than the front. Generally its advisable to use those air blowers to remove dust without touching anything.
06-14-2015, 02:58 PM   #12
New Member




Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 6
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by cyclone3d Quote
Definitely the sensor. Have you tried the dust removal function on the camera?

Do you have automatic dust removal enabled?

Try pointing the camera vertically down and then use the dust removal function multiple times in a row.

If the dust removal function doesn't help, then it needs to be serviced.

How exactly does one get a lot of dust on the mirror or anything else inside the body in the first place?
I haven't tried it... I did enable the automatic dust removal, I will take some photos tomorrow to see whether or not it worked. And, I don't know how all that dust got inside the body. Perhaps, when I was switching lens. But honestly, this is just sad because this camera is brand new. Barely used it for 2 months.

---------- Post added 06-14-15 at 03:10 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Na Horuk Quote
Nope! The mirror does not affect the photo! You can have a mirror sprayed with red paint and it will not affect the image, as long as the mirror moves out of the way correctly.
You see, when a shot is taken, the mirror moves out of the way, then the shutter courtain opens, exposing the sensor for the shutter speed number, and then the shutter closes and the mirror closes after it.
Those spots you see are dust spots on the actual sensor. You can turn on the dust removal function in the camera (many people set it up to automatically do that on shut down. These options are in the Menu, feel free to check the manual).
The other thing you can do is use the sensor cleaning function and use a rocket blower to blow off the dust, being careful not to actually touch the sensor. There are many threads and tutorials about sensor cleaning btw, just search these forums or the net. There are other tools for sensor cleaning, but the air blower should be enough to begin. Some shops offer this as a service. In some countries you even get a free sensor cleaning as part of the warranty (or extended warranty).

Edit: One more thing. Similar spots can be caused by dust on the back of the lens, but that is more rare. Anyway, you can check that as well, but be careful, as the back of the lens is more sensitive than the front. Generally its advisable to use those air blowers to remove dust without touching anything.
Thank you SO much for taking the time to explain all this to me, I really appreciate your help.

Just to get things straight - dust on the mirror, focusing screen or on the pentaprism DOES NOT affect the image in any way? And if there is any dust inside the body, it CANNOT spread to the sensor itself?

I set the camera to automatically remove dust upon shut down, however, I am very confused about the recommendation in the previous post - pointing the camera vertically down and enabling this function. Any thoughts on this?

I will look into sensor cleaning as in professional cleaning but I know that there are no official Pentax shops where I live (Paris, France). And I am reluctant to send the camera to the service center that Pentax partnered with because well, I am scared that shipping would damage the camera.

And... sigh... I used a Lenspen on the back of the lens as well... Honestly, I feel so ashamed about the lack of my knowledge on camera cleaning. I guess I should have really taken time to research this topic... again, thank you so much!
06-14-2015, 03:28 PM   #13
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: New York
Posts: 3,313
Sensor dust is a usual occurrence with any removable lens camera. You just need one lens change as a bunch of dust comes floating by - boom, dust in the mirror box that gets past the shutter when you snap photos.

The best tool for cleaning sensor dust is a rocket blower (never use canned air because it can spit wet propellant on your sensor). That will get rid of most dust spots. A stubborn spot might need a sensor cleaning kit but dry dust always comes off with the blower.
06-14-2015, 04:06 PM   #14
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 5,002
QuoteOriginally posted by bonfireheart Quote
Any chance some of that carbon could get inside the sensor?
Well *on*, not inside. So it is potentially just more dust in your mirror box that may end up on your sensor at some point, so then you clean the sensor, not the mirror. The substance is not harmful -- LensPen actually sells a sensor cleaner that is the same as a normal LensPen but with a smaller tip and it articulates a bit. You haven't done any damage to anything doesn't sound like. I recommend a rocket blower and the EyeLead sticky gel stick. The EyeLead (or similar, there are others but I got a bad one time that wasn't sticky and didn't do much good) is the only thing other than a wet cleaning that actually picks up particles and takes them away (rather than just blowing them around and hoping they go away), but wet cleaning is usually overkill and often leaves its own residue. In fact the only way I've ever been able to clean a sensor that had any stubborn particles that wouldn't blow off and not leave some sort of new residue behind was with the gel stick.
06-14-2015, 07:05 PM   #15
Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2014
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 982
Looks like you got the dust off the Lens Pen onto the Sensor, never put that thing inside your Camera never ever
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
body, brush, camera, carbon, dust, lens, lenspen, mirror, pentax help, photography, questions, removal, sensor, shutter, spots, tip, troubleshooting
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is this Pentax's future? Translucent mirror with adjustable transmission rate patent Mistral75 Pentax News and Rumors 78 02-09-2015 08:10 AM
Sticky mirror syndrome on a Pentax MZ-S filmamigo Pentax Film SLR Discussion 2 07-15-2014 05:55 AM
Cleaned my focusing screen today peterjcb Pentax DSLR Discussion 4 03-24-2014 04:13 PM
K30 in the rain with a regular lens DominicVII Pentax K-30 & K-50 9 12-30-2012 01:59 PM
Cleaned my K10D... GordonZA General Talk 3 07-12-2011 10:46 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:15 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top