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08-20-2015, 08:37 PM   #1
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Bright spots in pictures

So, I'm getting some weird bright spots when I shoot with my HD 70mm and Pentax K5 II. Can you please tell me what it is? And how to get rid of them?

I've attached pics.

Thanks!

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08-20-2015, 08:40 PM   #2
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hopefully it's just dust.....try a rocket blower to give the sensor a 'clean'
08-20-2015, 08:53 PM - 1 Like   #3
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Hot pixels.

Try the pixel mapping feature on your camera.
08-20-2015, 09:34 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by vikranta Quote
So, I'm getting some weird bright spots when I shoot with my HD 70mm and Pentax K5 II. Can you please tell me what it is? And how to get rid of them?

I've attached pics.

Thanks!
To me those look like neither dust nor hot pixels, but rather reflections. Are you using a cheap filter with your lens?


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08-20-2015, 09:46 PM   #5
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I had my polarizer on. But it's B+W. I thought those are high quality ones
08-20-2015, 10:13 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by alamo5000 Quote
Try the pixel mapping feature on your camera.
I concur , most likely a sensor issue. If it was a fare issue, dots wouldn't be small, but would rather look like brighter zones. If that was a dust issue, dots would be darker than their surrounding in the image. It's a good idea to try pixel mapping.
08-20-2015, 10:43 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
To me those look like neither dust nor hot pixels, but rather reflections.
I believe Adam is right. The quality of the filter, while reducing the chance of reflection, does not eliminate it, especially at night.
The two spots on the portrait correspond to the highlights of the sunglasses. Also the light spots are in different places in the two photos. Hot pixels are just that, single pixels stuck in the on position and do not occur in clusters like your spots.
Shoot in raw and process the photos to remove haze and ditch the filters. No matter the quality, and extra piece of glass degrades the image.
08-20-2015, 11:18 PM - 1 Like   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aaron28 Quote
hopefully it's just dust.....try a rocket blower to give the sensor a 'clean'
Wrong! Dust almost invariably appears as black specks on the sensor.

QuoteOriginally posted by alamo5000 Quote
Hot pixels. Try the pixel mapping feature on your camera.
Wrong! Hot pixels are very small bright spots, they can only be seen clearly at 100% view. They are a sensor defect and appear in exactly the same place all the time until they are mapped out.

QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
to me those look like neither dust nor hot pixels, but rather reflections. Are you using a cheap filter with your lens?
Correct! the best solution is simply remove the offending filter, and use the lens hood for protection like 99% of us do for everyday shooting anyway.

QuoteOriginally posted by vikranta Quote
I had my polarizer on. But it's B+W. I thought those are high quality ones
Polarisers are only to be used in certain situations, cheap and expensive filters alike can suffer from flare no matter what you do* so frequently it is best to take them off when they aren't needed. there is also the possibility that the filter might be a fake. When a manufacturer makes a good product there will be cheap re-badged copies trying to cash in on that good name.

FYI: polarisers are never used for available light portraiture, they make the models hair look dirty, dull and unkempt.They can also introduce colour casts that can have an unfortunate effect on a models skin.

* Though with expensive filters the reflections will be smaller making them more manageable, easier to clone out, rather than catastrophically degrading contrast and ruining the entire image.


Last edited by Digitalis; 08-20-2015 at 11:36 PM.
08-20-2015, 11:26 PM   #9
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Those are manifestation of the paranormal activity in your camera!

What Adam said... get rid of that filter.
08-21-2015, 12:33 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by mdave13 Quote
I believe Adam is right. The quality of the filter, while reducing the chance of reflection, does not eliminate it, especially at night.
The two spots on the portrait correspond to the highlights of the sunglasses. Also the light spots are in different places in the two photos. Hot pixels are just that, single pixels stuck in the on position and do not occur in clusters like your spots.
Shoot in raw and process the photos to remove haze and ditch the filters. No matter the quality, and extra piece of glass degrades the image.
Dave, I agree with your diagnosis 100% it definitely is a reflection of the sunglasses highlights.

Unfortunately the next sentence I simply cannot agree with. Shooting in RAW will not do anything to remove an optical artifact from the initial image. While it may be easier to correct in RAW after the fact, it has nothing to do with how the artifact appears in the image. I don't want to get into a RAW vs JPEG discussion or otherwise hijack the thread, but the comment really does not help the OP
08-21-2015, 04:58 AM   #11
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There's a symmetry around the centre of the frame with Filter Flare that can help you spot it (along with the preservation of the shape and size of the highlights). Was the first image a crop?
08-21-2015, 05:54 AM   #12
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Hello everyone.. thank you for your comments so far.. you've all been very helpful.. I think the analysis on the reflection of the sunglasses as those spots was brilliant. It is so obvious to me now!

Yes, I think it could be the filter too because I don't see that problem with my other lens. This is the only lens I had the polarizer filter on. I was trying to keep the haze low with the filter but it was leaving some ugly spots in my images.

In any case, I ran the pixel mapping program on my K5ii just to be sure. I will try shooting today without the filter.
08-21-2015, 10:47 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
Dave, I agree with your diagnosis 100% it definitely is a reflection of the sunglasses highlights.

Unfortunately the next sentence I simply cannot agree with. Shooting in RAW will not do anything to remove an optical artifact from the initial image. While it may be easier to correct in RAW after the fact, it has nothing to do with how the artifact appears in the image. I don't want to get into a RAW vs JPEG discussion or otherwise hijack the thread, but the comment really does not help the OP
If you had understood the sentence, the suggestion to shoot in raw and was meant to address the OP's reason for using the filter, namely to get rid of haze, and not in removing the artifacts in the existing photo.
08-21-2015, 03:20 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Digitalis Quote
Wrong
thanks for pointing that out! or I would have never ever known!
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