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07-18-2016, 07:11 PM   #1
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Not work safe - Developing problem.

Hi Guys

Im new to the forum, but I expect to learn a lot from you guys. Im a professional wedding and boudoir photographer from Mexico. Father of 3 girls and photography passionate.
My grandfather died a few years ago and I got all his photography gear, some pentax, leica, mamiya and olympus cameras, plus patterson tanks and lots of stuff. So i decided to give it a try to film photography again.

The last time I developed a film was 18 years ago, so Im a little rusty.
Yesterday I developed 3 35mm films (2 Across 100 films shot with Olympus, 1 ilford HP5 Plus with Nikon F100), and 2 120 across 100 films (mamiya 645TL). all developed with new D76 kodak developer, fixed with kodak Rapifix. and all the process was perfect in times and "recipes".
Today that Im Scanning the film, 1 across 35 and the ilford Hp5 seem to be overexposed from a complete side (the full roll), the other across is fine with no errors.

do you have an idea of what is wrong? It had more developer than needed (the tank specifies 290ml, I added like 310ml), tranfered the rolls exactly the same inside a darkroom bag (even the one that has no errors), all the process was the same.

The 120 film rolls only show the last half of the roll, the first half is overexposed completely.

The patterson tank is sealed, does not leak, it has all the parts.

Any ideas?

thanks in advance.
Ever Lopez

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Last edited by photolady95; 07-19-2016 at 04:25 AM. Reason: Removed personal site. Re read the rules
07-18-2016, 07:24 PM   #2
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I don't understand the 2 across 100 films, etc.

Did this over exposure occur with all three cameras or just one?

If only one camera, I'm no expert but I wonder if you have a light leak into the camera as the over-exposure is along one edge (is that top or bottom of the roll as it sits in the camera?).

If all, I's say a light leak into what ever is common in the development stage, e.g., the tank or the change bag or wherever you load the tank.
07-18-2016, 07:37 PM   #3
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thanks P38arover

the Across 100 is a Fuji Neopan film (sorry, I assumed it was common), Im sure the cameras are not leaking light, since I shot color films and send them to the lab, and they were fine.
the process on the 3 35mm rolls was all the same, but only 1 came ok, im almost sure that the roll that was ok was developed with another roll inside the tank (developed 2 rolls at a time).

any ideas?

thanks
07-18-2016, 07:46 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by p38arover Quote
I don't understand the 2 across 100 films, etc.
"2 Across films" means 2 rolls of Fuji ACROS 100 speed film.

Fujifilm USA | Neopan 100 Acros : Overview

---------- Post added 07-18-16 at 07:50 PM ----------

I also suggest a light leak in the tank, as the first thing to check.

What does the film (not the contact sheet or the scanned negative, whichever you posted above) look like? The part that is overexposed on one side, is that "overexposed" part of the film even developed, or did it somehow stay undeveloped?

07-18-2016, 07:55 PM - 1 Like   #5
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How are the edge numbers on the negatives? This usually helps to determine if you did not use enough chemistry in the tank, but considering these are older cameras that havenʻt been used or tested for a long time, I also suspect light leaks on your 35mm cameras. I do not think it was your developing. On the next test roll, put black camera tape on all the seams where light can leak into the top and bottom of the camera back.

You will need to go through a process of elimination to determine what is the problem and solution.

Iʻve been using Paterson developing tanks for decades and youʻd see if the plastic was cracked and leaking. You did use the black tube that goes thru the white film reel with the bigger side on the bottom of the tank?
07-18-2016, 10:49 PM   #6
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Times, temperatures, dilution, and agitation (frequency and method) please.

The top strip appears to show a light leak, but it is hard to tell whether it happened in the camera or during processing and to what extent it affected overall density. It is apparent that at least part of the light leak occurred post-exposure.

Neither of the films in question should have shown the obvious grain in the lower photo.


Steve
07-19-2016, 03:31 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ever Lopez Quote
The 120 film rolls only show the last half of the roll, the first half is overexposed completely.
this is a telling detail, you have a light leak somewhere in your developing tank. It is also possible there is a light leak in the Camera.

QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Neither of the films in question should have shown the obvious grain in the lower photo.
I agree, for 120 format Neopan web sized images should not show this amount of grain.

Last edited by Digitalis; 07-19-2016 at 03:38 AM.
07-19-2016, 04:11 AM   #8
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For me, it seems like a leak in the darkroom bag, used to put the film into the developing tank.

I personally have never done this, I always used a true darkroom, totally sealed no light leaks

07-19-2016, 04:41 AM   #9
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one way or another, hunting down light leaks is a pain - I wish you luck!
07-19-2016, 04:49 AM - 1 Like   #10
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I can't help you, but I can say that I really like the picture of the girl holding her phone! With the light leak, it suggests someone looking where he shouldn't, it gives mood to the image, tells a story. That's a really good one!
07-19-2016, 05:10 AM   #11
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The posted strip looks very much like a light leak, most likely not the camera as it would be uniform frame to frame. I would suspect 1) the film canister; 2) developing tank; 3) something during transfer of film from canister to tank.
07-19-2016, 02:36 PM   #12
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Hi Guys

it is over developed or overexposed, I can barely read the numbers on the edge of the film.
I'm sure the cameras are not the problem, since the color rolls developed in a lab are ok, from both cameras, I shot like 5 or 6 rolls on each, and everything was ok.
The problem is the developing of the b&w in my house.

Yes, I used the black tube inside the tank.

This photo is from the same Olympus camera and the roll is ok.

About the process, I used this recipe:
FilmDev | Elmogran's recipe | Fuji Neopan Acros 100 in Kodak D-76 1+1

and followed it 100%, I did it in my kitchen, sunday morning, not a dark ambient. regular house light.
I transfered the film from the roll to the patterson tank inside a darkroom double bag. this picture was made the same process. that is what makes me wonder what is happening.

Thanks for your help.

Ever
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07-19-2016, 06:11 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ever Lopez Quote
Any ideas?
Looks like the 120 spool did not wrap tightly (in the camera) and that the light leaked in through the paper-flange interface. It could be a tank leak, but that seems less likely given the damage pattern.

For the 35mm, you're getting that saw-tooth pattern due, in all probability, to over-aggressive agitation. That saw-tooth pattern is from developer surge and happens when there's a differential flow pattern from the chemistry moving through the sprocket holes more quickly than the space between the holes. For a pretty simple demonstration, hold your hands in a moving stream and you'll see how the space behind your hands has calmer, slower water. That's developer surge in a nutshell. The added developer over-movement over-develops the film. With 120 film, it's not noticeable due to the lack of sprocket holes.

For your last image, the white lines are due to dust. They're a sign that your negative drying area is not clean enough or that your fix has contamination (a good way to avoid this is to pour your chemistry through a filtered funnel before adding it to your tank. If it's dust, then you simply need a cleaner space OR something that can pull dust away from your film. For instance, I dry my film in the spare tub and leave the bathroom fan on (with the door closed). That pulls any dust in the air away from my film and the results are pretty good. Some really gonzo people build drying cabinets with air filters and self-contained heat sources like a 40-watt light bulb.

---------- Post added 07-19-16 at 06:13 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Neither of the films in question should have shown the obvious grain in the lower photo.
Looks like the developer was spent.

OP, were you using re-used developer, developer that had been sitting a long time, or old chemicals?
07-20-2016, 08:23 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by K David Quote
Looks like the 120 spool did not wrap tightly (in the camera) and that the light leaked in through the paper-flange interface. It could be a tank leak, but that seems less likely given the damage pattern.

For the 35mm, you're getting that saw-tooth pattern due, in all probability, to over-aggressive agitation. That saw-tooth pattern is from developer surge and happens when there's a differential flow pattern from the chemistry moving through the sprocket holes more quickly than the space between the holes. For a pretty simple demonstration, hold your hands in a moving stream and you'll see how the space behind your hands has calmer, slower water. That's developer surge in a nutshell. The added developer over-movement over-develops the film. With 120 film, it's not noticeable due to the lack of sprocket holes.

For your last image, the white lines are due to dust. They're a sign that your negative drying area is not clean enough or that your fix has contamination (a good way to avoid this is to pour your chemistry through a filtered funnel before adding it to your tank. If it's dust, then you simply need a cleaner space OR something that can pull dust away from your film. For instance, I dry my film in the spare tub and leave the bathroom fan on (with the door closed). That pulls any dust in the air away from my film and the results are pretty good. Some really gonzo people build drying cabinets with air filters and self-contained heat sources like a 40-watt light bulb.

---------- Post added 07-19-16 at 06:13 PM ----------



Looks like the developer was spent.

OP, were you using re-used developer, developer that had been sitting a long time, or old chemicals?

The developer and all the chemicals are completely new, mixed them a day before the development.
I'havent upoad any 120 pics, all of them are 35mm. I dont know how to upload the problem, since its the complete roll, the first half is developed and the second half is blown overexposed. so I only got 6 pictures from the entire roll.

thanks
07-20-2016, 08:54 AM   #15
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Here is a scan from the 120 film, it also has the same leaking problem as the 35mm.
what do you say? the tank?
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