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10-13-2016, 07:57 AM - 1 Like   #91
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The EXIF for the picture of the girl shows an under exposure of 2.3 stops.
Under-exposing then recovering in PP is never going to give as good of a result as properly exposing to begin with.

10-13-2016, 08:08 AM - 1 Like   #92
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QuoteOriginally posted by donlass Quote
Oh i guess that explains that one.
I guess I would say on this photo that you missed your focus. Looks front focused, maybe? White balance feels off -- a little too yellow for my taste. At iso 3200 this is probably what you can expect, although certainly hitting your focus would improve things. The 50 macro is a very sharp lens, even at f2.8, but hitting focus is probably most important thing.
10-13-2016, 03:33 PM - 1 Like   #93
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QuoteOriginally posted by donlass Quote
Oh i guess that explains that one.
Yep, that's not sharp, and software won't save it.

ISO 3200, poorly lit, poor contrast for the autofocus module, shutter speed not great for a living subject - this is a real test for any photographer, Donlass, and we *do* attempt them, but this would be a great candidate for a flash shot, lit from one side for drama.

I think, since you're saying you're new to the DSLR world, for building your sharpness skills you practice really nailing ISO 100, f8 shots outdoors with a tripod, then only when you've got the hang of how AF works, move to hand held, shaded environments, etc.

Your K3 II is an excellent camera, and I know the D FA 50mm f2.8 Macro is a superb one - I've got it, myself.

Last edited by clackers; 10-13-2016 at 03:55 PM.
10-14-2016, 06:13 AM - 1 Like   #94
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I really would practice focusing and selecting auto focus points. I don't like the whole center point-recompose method of auto focusing, although I know it works for some people. If your focus isn't sharp in the important part of an image (the eyes in a portrait) then the rest of the image is probably not going to work effectively (that's not always true, but still unless you specifically want a soft photo for some reason, I'd try to have your focus right).

If you can use lower iso, that is good too, although certainly too low a shutter speed will tend to soften your image. Clackers is right, that bounce flash can help -- it adds light to an image and will help high iso images look better, it also tends to freeze motion because of the short duration of the flash.

Underexposure is definitely a no-no with high iso images. If you shoot at iso 3200 and then have to brighten the image in post, you will introduce a lot more noise into it, which is problematic.



This is shot at f2, iso 100 and 1/500 second on a K3. Focus is pretty good on her eyes -- in looking at it, it isn't a great image, but a fine image of my daughter. Having decent light here really helped me, as I have a good shutter speed with low iso.


Last edited by Rondec; 10-14-2016 at 06:27 AM.
10-14-2016, 06:38 PM   #95
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OK, on the previous underexposed picture apparently I hit the EV Comp button.
anyhoo.... I thought I had something here but still more drab, the twilight sun was behind me. Can I make it into something PP?
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10-14-2016, 06:44 PM   #96
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Again not what I envisioned.
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10-14-2016, 06:44 PM   #97
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I don't see anything wrong with either picture.
The quilt photo could, maybe, use a bit of a curves adjustment to increase midtone contrast, but that's arguable.
10-14-2016, 06:48 PM   #98
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QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
I don't see anything wrong with that picture.
Does it look sharp to you?

---------- Post added 10-14-16 at 22:08 ----------

Believe me I'm not looking for attention, I just don't see it...

10-14-2016, 07:23 PM   #99
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Yes, it looks quite sharp to me.
It's easy to confuse lack of midtone contrast with lack of sharpness.
10-14-2016, 09:02 PM   #100
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apparently it's also easy to confuse a painted wall with a quilt...

I thought the light fixture would be a dead giveaway
10-14-2016, 10:20 PM - 1 Like   #101
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If this was corrected as a RAW file it would come out better. Still...

1) Reduced grain using Topaz DeNoise, (very low setting not to loose detail) unless you want grain but close up portraits don't really benefit from grain.
2) Oloneo PhotoEngine to correct colour. Increased the barest of "Detail Strength".
3) Increased brightness a little. (You need to increase brightness a bit more if you want to print this image).
4) Very light sharpening

Did not do anything to the eyes but they were lifted automatically by the above corrections.

I strongly recommend to work on corrections with the original image side by side with the corrected one, only this way can you judge your corrections. This is the reason I posted both images and you decide whether it is better or not.

That's it, less than two minute work.

Cheers

Last edited by Schraubstock; 11-15-2016 at 03:11 AM.
10-14-2016, 11:21 PM - 1 Like   #102
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QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
Now that I see your shots, there are both aesthetic composition, attention to lighting, and other art elements and principles that would help.

a) Look up and use the "Rule of Thirds" with your focal point or subject facing toward the center of the frame, not the edges.
b) Use more negative space. Often the space where your subject isn't helps to define and contextualize the subject itself.
c) Try to shoot when the light and shadows are dramatic.
d) Look for interesting textures, reflections, and if color does not add anything to the shot, render it in black and white.
e) Seek out irony, contrast, conflict, opposites in the same frame. Something ugly on something beautiful. Something old and rusty with something young and immaculate. Harmony between the foreground and background is nice (boring) but is transformative when opposites in the same frame.
f) Try to find "the decisive moment" (Cartier-Bresson). That split second between the past and future in which the present is extraordinary.
g) Shoot unique or different angles.
h) And when all else fails, TRAVEL to a place where you cannot speak the language. Your eyes will explode with curiosity as you discover new cultures, environments, and sights.
That's very good advice. Add some PP experience/tech skills and you're there.
10-15-2016, 02:47 AM - 1 Like   #103
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QuoteOriginally posted by donlass Quote
Again not what I envisioned.
My critique of your photo would be to say that there isn't enough foreground interest. You put the horizon in the middle, which it would probably be better higher or lower (rule of thirds). You can certainly bump contrast and shadows some and it will improve the image somewhat. A little detail enhancement in Color Efex Pro helps too.

Something like this, is a quick edit on your image...
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10-15-2016, 05:29 AM   #104
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QuoteOriginally posted by wibbly Quote
apparently it's also easy to confuse a painted wall with a quilt...

I thought the light fixture would be a dead giveaway
I guess we were both wrong, eh?
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