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10-12-2016, 07:27 PM   #1
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How do you shoot the moon?

So I took this shot tonight and was wondering if anyone had any input on how i could possibly make it better? To note I used a tripod and the phone app to fire the picture.

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10-12-2016, 07:42 PM   #2
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Spot metering is my choice, but for large shots a turbulent atmosphere can be a big issue. Some nights you just won't win, but weather forecasts can predict stability and transparency.
10-12-2016, 07:47 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by jimr-pdx Quote
Spot metering is my choice, but for large shots a turbulent atmosphere can be a big issue. Some nights you just won't win, but weather forecasts can predict stability and transparency.
I'll try spot metering thanks !
10-12-2016, 08:18 PM   #4
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The two most important things, IMO, are a stable tripod (along with a sufficiently fast shutter speed) and nailing the focus. Live view really helps for that

Once you master the technique, the lens will be your limiting factor. Based on the attached shot, I'd say your technique is already pretty good! Just sharpen it a bit and boost the contrast to give it that pop.


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10-12-2016, 08:25 PM - 1 Like   #5
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14 Tips for Shooting the Moon | explora

B&H had this in their Explora section, they also emailed it out in a news letter a few weeks ago. I've be meaning to give it a shot but the weather hasn't cooperated.
10-12-2016, 09:13 PM - 1 Like   #6
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I'd say the same as Adam but add manual focus with liveview zoomed in with focus peaking turned on.
10-12-2016, 09:45 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
The two most important things, IMO, are a stable tripod (along with a sufficiently fast shutter speed) and nailing the focus. Live view really helps for that

Once you master the technique, the lens will be your limiting factor. Based on the attached shot, I'd say your technique is already pretty good! Just sharpen it a bit and boost the contrast to give it that pop.
Thanks ill keep that in mind !
10-12-2016, 10:02 PM - 2 Likes   #8
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I concur with the above and would add the following:

  1. Decide if you want the moon in detail or as a spotlight, both approaches will work with the right context.
  2. If you're after detail, the moon is best captured during daylight hours, to do this I recommend planning on where to shoot from and when to shoot by using a program like the Photographer's Ephemeris: The Photographer's Ephemeris: TPE for Desktop There's plenty of apps like this for your smart phone too, another good one is Sun Surveyor.
  3. As the moon is reflecting the sun it is very bright, so you will be able to get away with faster than expected shutter speeds, so stop down to f8-f11 and see how the exposures look and adjust your shutter speed accordingly.
  4. Go manual focus and live view as suggested. If you're shooting the moon as it's rising keep it lower in the field of view to start with as it will transit upwards and this will give you more time to work with. The reverse is of course applicable if you're catching the moon setting.
  5. You need mirror lock up so you minimise shaking/vibration, if your phone app doesn't give you this a cheap wired remote will do.
  6. If it's windy then you'd be best off looking for a sheltered location to shoot from. The long lens will magnify movements/vibration caused by wind.
  7. Don't be deterred by clouds, some of the most atmospheric moon images include cloud. Fast moving cloud across the face of the moon looks really kewl on video.
  8. The moon added to landscapes etc can add something special to your images, there's a thread here if you're looking for some idease/inspiration: https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/26-mini-challenges-games-photo-stories/27...your-moon.html
Good luck,


Tas

10-12-2016, 10:55 PM - 2 Likes   #9
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There are two clous: stability and exposure. You should have a really sturdy and stabile tripod. Use selftimer and, if you have, remote shutter release. As far as exposure concerned try to set lowest ISO possible and f8. Start with 1/160s. Set AF to spot. You can take really nice images of the moon.
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10-12-2016, 11:03 PM - 2 Likes   #10
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1/160 sec, f/8, ISO 100 handheld @ 450mm on K3.
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10-12-2016, 11:33 PM - 2 Likes   #11
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I will only add that you should take plenty of pictures. Due to air turbulence chances are that some will be better than others even if you don’t change anything between the shots.
10-13-2016, 02:53 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by david94903 Quote
1/160 sec, f/8, ISO 100 handheld @ 450mm on K3.
nice shot !
10-13-2016, 03:49 AM - 1 Like   #13
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Freezing night in Bleak City tonight, which always helps.

K3ii, DA 300mm F4 and 1.4TC.

ISO 100, F8, 1/320 Sec.

Focused using live view, with zoom in (you go to live view then press the OK button).Mirror lock up and shutter release to minimise vibration. I also use a pretty chunky tripod.
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10-13-2016, 04:09 AM   #14
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By betting it all!!

Ooops. Misunderstood the question. The moon is a pretty close to an 18% grey card. I have always used the sunny 16 rule as a starting point. 1/ASA (ISO in newspeak) at f16. Exposure would vary by how close the moon is the the horizon. Sunny 16 rule applies to directly overhead as that it when the light from it passes through the least amount of atmosphere. Since the moon is the same distance from the sun as earth,the amount of light energy reaching it is the same.
10-13-2016, 07:22 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
By betting it all!!

Ooops. Misunderstood the question. The moon is a pretty close to an 18% grey card. I have always used the sunny 16 rule as a starting point. 1/ASA (ISO in newspeak) at f16. Exposure would vary by how close the moon is the the horizon. Sunny 16 rule applies to directly overhead as that it when the light from it passes through the least amount of atmosphere. Since the moon is the same distance from the sun as earth,the amount of light energy reaching it is the same.
The actual "rule" I grew up with is f8 at 1/ISO (ASA back then) for the moon. F16 sunny sixteen was for sunny conditions. In practice on dslr I find this rule to result in photos that are a bit too dark but it is a good place to start.
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