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12-22-2016, 10:09 PM   #16
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and bought and sold a lottttttttt of lenses. haha. my sig isn't even correct at the moment.

12-22-2016, 10:40 PM - 3 Likes   #17
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I think you are spot on with getting a good tripod..... then maybe a ND filter or two to do some long exposure stuff. I'd then focus on developing my software skills with lightroom etc..... shooting RAW off course...mostly. I love the DA 10-17 (more then the DA 15).... and a good pentax 300 prime opens many doors as well.

DA 10-17... catching some fast paced action....


Tough day at the office
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Last edited by noelpolar; 12-22-2016 at 11:42 PM.
12-22-2016, 10:45 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by gm4life Quote
Hi all,

First I want to thank everyone for the warm welcome to the forum. What an awesome online community!

I am curious where do I go from this point...

I have the following and I am looking for advise on new toys or gear to complete my "kit" and books to read, software etc.....
Its consumer madness. start with more bags

---------- Post added 23rd Dec 2016 at 06:47 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by wibbly Quote
....

but you need to take an awful lot of photos at 300 to justify a 1000 dollar lens.
....
Hey that's crazy talk...one shot can do it

---------- Post added 23rd Dec 2016 at 06:50 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by mee Quote
Hello. It depends on what you want to do with your gear. ......
and the rest of what mee said
12-23-2016, 01:38 AM - 1 Like   #19
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Like the others said before go out, shoot and find out what you really need before buying more equipment.

Like you said one thing that's missing is a tripod. But you should really have a look at different tripods. I would recommend going for a Sirui. I just bought a tripod and ballhead and had the chance to try out different ballheads from both Manfrotto and Sirui. I tried Manfrottos XPRO head that costs more than the tripod/head combo you are considering and even that didn't come close to the quality and feel of the Sirui heads. Also the 290 series of Manfrotto has a pretty low working height and maximum work load. Tripods are something you shouldn't buy online. Have a look at it in a store and get a feeling for height, quality and handling.


Last edited by alpheios; 12-23-2016 at 01:47 AM.
12-23-2016, 02:06 AM - 1 Like   #20
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IF I were you, the next acquisition would be a tripod and perhaps an ND filter for your 16-85mm zoom. The tripod will give you night and interior options for shooting without a flash and open the world of long exposures, HDR, and increase depth of field or lower ISO.

Nothing wrong with the other considerations, but to me a tripod, unlike the other options, is the game changer. A majority of award-winning landscapes are done with tripods. On Netflix, there is a documentary about photography and Art Wolfe is in the Antarctic shooting landscapes in daylight but with an ND filter so he can use long exposures to give just that slight amount of blur to the water and sky and trees, but have it contrasted with razor sharp rocks and ice.
12-23-2016, 04:43 AM   #21
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The DA15 and DA300 are amazing lenses. If you've got eyes on a k-1 in the future, get the DA300, otherwise get the DA15.
12-23-2016, 06:15 AM   #22
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You need a good sturdy tripod. I will let others advise.

You need a cable or wireless remote shutter release (your choice), preferably one that can be locked in the open position for extended night exposures.

You need to get out and take at least 20,000 pictures over the course of the next year. Don't be afraid to fail.

You need to consider filters, e.g. ND, graded ND, graded colour, polarising. That enables you to do some of your light modifying before the light even hits the sensor. If you have a whole range of lenses, you can consider the Cokin P system or one of its third party equivalents, the latter of which will let you put filters in front of varying lenses with varying filter thread sizes at very little cost, e.g. on Amazon, XCSOURCEŽ 8 PCS Graduated ND Filter Set(ND2 ND4 ND8 ND16 G.ND2 G.ND4 G.N8 G.ND16)+ 9 Metal Adapter Ring (49mm/52mm/55mm/58mm/62mm/67mm/72mm/77mm/82mm)+ Holder For Cokin P LF291

The Cokin A system is significantly more compact, but more or less obsolete now that front element sizes are getting steadily bigger.
12-23-2016, 07:14 AM   #23
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"Where do I go from here?"

Go in front of subjects. Take photos.

Then go in front of your computer, review, edit, and print your photos.

Assess how your photos could improve. Better technique? Better subjects? Better lighting? Better inspiration? Better/new equipment? Take appropriate steps to be better. Post examples here if you need help, it can be hard to assess yourself honestly and end up needlessly throwing money at a problem.

Go in front of subject. Take pictures.

...etc...


It's tough to determine what you need without really knowing what sort of things you shoot or what you're trying to improve upon. I'd also go with a tripod as the safe, most usefull addition if you're just looking for something to spend money on. But I also know people who buy them but end up leaving them in the closet, so who knows where your money will be best spent.

12-23-2016, 09:44 AM   #24
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I would like to add:

OP has lenses covering 16mm to 300mm, a fast fifty, and one of the best and most versatile macro lenses I've ever used (I know because I own the SMC version). They don't need any more glass until they've taken those 20,000 pics I mentioned above and assessed where their best shots are clustering and whether anything is to be gained from buying more (particularly when it comes to expensive primes).

Most of the lenses I'm buying now are for my film bodies, because I've taken a look at the fairly large amount of shooting I'm doing and assessed where the gaps in my armamentarium are and what I need to either get shots I wasn't getting before or get the same shots with far less effort (which makes getting them more fun, so I can think more about how to jazz them up a little and struggle less with just making them in the first place). Most of what I'm buying now is filters, lens hoods... I've spent the last couple of months with a deglassed tele-extender which makes any of my lenses a macro (or at least ultra close focus) if that's what I want. I even deferred my (fully wife-authorised, LOL) purchase of the K-1 because I don't really need it at the moment, and I have the option between now and my birthday to handle one in a store and decide whether I even WANT it.

I know exactly what I want out of that camera - I've had a vague and increasingly firm notion ever since we were given a clear look at the control layout - and that along with all the other stuff it has will be enough to make me buy it IF the tactile reality matches my expectations.

If not, however, I know what several shoots in the theatre in my home town have taught me about the best single lens for that scenario. If in-store handling of the K-1 disappoints, a DA*50-135 is coming home with me instead: a specific lens for a specific need, based on hundreds of shots on multiple occasions under real-world conditions. THAT is how you decide to buy a lens - or any equipment, for that matter.
12-23-2016, 10:04 AM   #25
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I've quite enjoyed a number of 55-300 images. I wouldn't really consider the 300 ƒ4 unless you're planning to use it with a TC, where the extra sharpness might make a difference.



You could start your FA ltds collection, 31, 43 and 77, which could be a segue into suggesting some fast glass. But, the first thing I'd do would be analyze what images you have to find out what you use most. You've covered the basics. Covering "specifics" with high end glass, should be a little less experimental and a little more based on useage.

Last edited by normhead; 12-23-2016 at 10:50 AM.
12-23-2016, 10:48 AM   #26
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I agree with the suggestion to get rid of all the UV filters. Instead, when not in use protect the lens with a lens cap, and make sure you have a lens hood appropriate to each lens. Make sure the hood is always attached correctly (not backwards!) when the lens is on the camera - not only will it improve image quality by reducing stray light, it will also help to protect the lens while in use.

Philip
12-23-2016, 10:58 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by MrB1 Quote
I agree with the suggestion to get rid of all the UV filters. Instead, when not in use protect the lens with a lens cap, and make sure you have a lens hood appropriate to each lens. Make sure the hood is always attached correctly (not backwards!) when the lens is on the camera - not only will it improve image quality by reducing stray light, it will also help to protect the lens while in use.

Philip
I would disagree with the above.... shooting side by side with other shooters, I've seen the difference a filter can make, especially with regards to having a blue sky with puffy white clouds as opposed to blown out white cloudless sky, shooting the same scene, although, we do use polarizers, not UV on most of our landscape lenses.
12-23-2016, 11:36 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
I would disagree with the above.... shooting side by side with other shooters, I've seen the difference a filter can make, especially with regards to having a blue sky with puffy white clouds as opposed to blown out white cloudless sky, shooting the same scene, although, we do use polarizers, not UV on most of our landscape lenses.
I was referring only to UV and/or protective filters.
12-23-2016, 12:21 PM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by wibbly Quote
and bought and sold a lottttttttt of lenses. haha. my sig isn't even correct at the moment.
Well changing sigs is a PITA. I figured I better get one setup!

---------- Post added 12-23-16 at 01:22 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by noelpolar Quote
I think you are spot on with getting a good tripod..... then maybe a ND filter or two to do some long exposure stuff. I'd then focus on developing my software skills with lightroom etc..... shooting RAW off course...mostly. I love the DA 10-17 (more then the DA 15).... and a good pentax 300 prime opens many doors as well.

DA 10-17... catching some fast paced action....


Tough day at the office
by Noel Leahy, on Flickr
Amazing image! I will look at some ND filters.

---------- Post added 12-23-16 at 01:23 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Transit Quote
Its consumer madness. start with more bags

---------- Post added 23rd Dec 2016 at 06:47 PM ----------



Hey that's crazy talk...one shot can do it

---------- Post added 23rd Dec 2016 at 06:50 PM ----------



and the rest of what mee said

I would think a few hundred but not one. I don't want to drop that kind of jack on it.

---------- Post added 12-23-16 at 01:25 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by alpheios Quote
Like the others said before go out, shoot and find out what you really need before buying more equipment.

Like you said one thing that's missing is a tripod. But you should really have a look at different tripods. I would recommend going for a Sirui. I just bought a tripod and ballhead and had the chance to try out different ballheads from both Manfrotto and Sirui. I tried Manfrottos XPRO head that costs more than the tripod/head combo you are considering and even that didn't come close to the quality and feel of the Sirui heads. Also the 290 series of Manfrotto has a pretty low working height and maximum work load. Tripods are something you shouldn't buy online. Have a look at it in a store and get a feeling for height, quality and handling.
Good advise on the tripods problem is finding a place around here who has them.

---------- Post added 12-23-16 at 01:26 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
IF I were you, the next acquisition would be a tripod and perhaps an ND filter for your 16-85mm zoom. The tripod will give you night and interior options for shooting without a flash and open the world of long exposures, HDR, and increase depth of field or lower ISO.

Nothing wrong with the other considerations, but to me a tripod, unlike the other options, is the game changer. A majority of award-winning landscapes are done with tripods. On Netflix, there is a documentary about photography and Art Wolfe is in the Antarctic shooting landscapes in daylight but with an ND filter so he can use long exposures to give just that slight amount of blur to the water and sky and trees, but have it contrasted with razor sharp rocks and ice.
Great advise a tripod is at the top of my list.

---------- Post added 12-23-16 at 01:28 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by robthebloke Quote
The DA15 and DA300 are amazing lenses. If you've got eyes on a k-1 in the future, get the DA300, otherwise get the DA15.
Not really thinking about frame at this point. So I would be more likely to go with the 15mm. The K1 is a great camera but way over kill for me.

---------- Post added 12-23-16 at 01:29 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by pathdoc Quote
You need a good sturdy tripod. I will let others advise.

You need a cable or wireless remote shutter release (your choice), preferably one that can be locked in the open position for extended night exposures.

You need to get out and take at least 20,000 pictures over the course of the next year. Don't be afraid to fail.

You need to consider filters, e.g. ND, graded ND, graded colour, polarising. That enables you to do some of your light modifying before the light even hits the sensor. If you have a whole range of lenses, you can consider the Cokin P system or one of its third party equivalents, the latter of which will let you put filters in front of varying lenses with varying filter thread sizes at very little cost, e.g. on Amazon, XCSOURCEŽ 8 PCS Graduated ND Filter Set(ND2 ND4 ND8 ND16 G.ND2 G.ND4 G.N8 G.ND16)+ 9 Metal Adapter Ring (49mm/52mm/55mm/58mm/62mm/67mm/72mm/77mm/82mm)+ Holder For Cokin P LF291

The Cokin A system is significantly more compact, but more or less obsolete now that front element sizes are getting steadily bigger.
Good point on not being afraid to fail, I sure will do the plenty of that!

---------- Post added 12-23-16 at 01:32 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by BrianR Quote
"Where do I go from here?"

Go in front of subjects. Take photos.

Then go in front of your computer, review, edit, and print your photos.

Assess how your photos could improve. Better technique? Better subjects? Better lighting? Better inspiration? Better/new equipment? Take appropriate steps to be better. Post examples here if you need help, it can be hard to assess yourself honestly and end up needlessly throwing money at a problem.

Go in front of subject. Take pictures.

...etc...


It's tough to determine what you need without really knowing what sort of things you shoot or what you're trying to improve upon. I'd also go with a tripod as the safe, most usefull addition if you're just looking for something to spend money on. But I also know people who buy them but end up leaving them in the closet, so who knows where your money will be best spent.

Excellent thought on the tripods being left at home. I do not want something so heavy it is a royal PITA to carry around.
12-23-2016, 12:35 PM   #30
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You did not mention anything about your monitor - maybe you just need a better IPS monitor?
And ND filters too.
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