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12-30-2017, 04:57 AM   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by Kerrowdown Quote
The normal first question to ask is... will the wildlife eat me?

I think with Badgers you'd be fairly safe.

But they are timid beasties, so perhaps long lenses will be required, also they operate at night time which is not ideal for imagery.

This is fairly specialised photography and will require some specialised kit to get good results. Not an ideal for any eleven year old start up package, perhaps a gentle nudge into a more accessible wildlife would be a good way to go.
the first and only badger I've met was attacking the pickup I was in
no flats but some serious gouges in the sidewalls
yours are handsome creatures

aren't badgers being culled in the uk? (something I saw recently)

a budding naturalist who has located a sett on his own will probably find other things to "shoot" as time goes on
my son is as enthusiastic at 40 as he was at 5...unfortunately he is primarily interested in herps

as to low-light photography...i'd let the kid figure it out as time goes by
you did..i did...it was part of the adventure
I've found the nature-curious to be more adaptable to what others would consider frustrations

no matter what other gear is purchased a tripod will probably guarantee its usefulness

12-30-2017, 08:13 AM - 1 Like   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by ccc_ Quote
aren't badgers being culled in the uk?
Aye, down in England-shire apparently to help with their Bovine Tuberculosis situation, seems not to be such an issue up here in Scotland.

QuoteOriginally posted by ccc_ Quote
i'd let the kid figure it out as time goes by you did..i did...it was part of the adventure I've found the nature-curious to be more adaptable to what others would consider frustrations
When advice was sought after, I thought my gentle let down was far nicer than, you'll need to throw several thousand of whatever local currency you have at it, in order to get the right kit to get reasonable results.
12-30-2017, 08:21 AM - 1 Like   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by Kerrowdown Quote
The normal first question to ask is... will the wildlife eat me?

I think with Badgers you'd be fairly safe.

But they are timid beasties, so perhaps long lenses will be required, also they operate at night time which is not ideal for imagery.

This is fairly specialised photography and will require some specialised kit to get good results. Not an ideal for any eleven year old start up package, perhaps a gentle nudge into a more accessible wildlife would be a good way to go.
never had a personal experience with a badger

but if there are no differences between those in the US and Scotland

they are reputed to be quite a fierce and dangerous animal if they feel threatened, you have " invaded " their space and they feel they have no retreat

like all wildlife, telephoto lenses are advised with cropping in pp if necessary

may not eat you but could do a lot of damage with those claws and jaws
12-30-2017, 08:41 AM - 1 Like   #34
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aslyfox Quote
never had a personal experience with a badger
I found I couldnae eat a whole one... not without leaving a few chips and the side salad.

12-30-2017, 08:48 AM - 1 Like   #35
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QuoteOriginally posted by Kerrowdown Quote
When advice was sought after, I thought my gentle let down was far nicer than, you'll need to throw several thousand of whatever local currency you have at it, in order to get the right kit to get reasonable results.
Most of us just aren't happy unless we've recommended gear that costs as much as a good used car. The thing slowing me down is the 11 year old thing. Too bad there are no good low light bridge cameras.

I'm thinking one of those motion activated wildlife cameras with a flash might be the way to go.

12-30-2017, 08:57 AM   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by Kerrowdown Quote
Aye, down in England-shire apparently to help with their Bovine Tuberculosis situation, seems not to be such an issue up here in Scotland.



When advice was sought after, I thought my gentle let down was far nicer than, you'll need to throw several thousand of whatever local currency you have at it, in order to get the right kit to get reasonable results.
it was a gallant attempt at a soft landing

just my experience has been with headstrong and determined children who really only were going to do the thing they asked about
so I learned to discard commonsense and establish a reasonably economic baseline for the efforts
then let the experience evolve organically...I mean out of my control

as in... you dumbass!
that one's poisonous!
at least use gloves!

dad...what are you worried about?
it didn't bite me

this is the same kid who worked in a zoo
one day while feeding the sharks decided to pet one
now there is a story for the rest of his life
12-30-2017, 08:59 AM - 1 Like   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
I'm thinking one of those motion activated wildlife cameras with a flash might be the way to go.
Now there's a thought, can stay home in the warm with a dram, while it does the work... happy days.
12-30-2017, 09:04 AM - 1 Like   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by ccc_ Quote
it was a gallant attempt at a soft landing
Thanks for that.

QuoteOriginally posted by ccc_ Quote
establish a reasonably economic baseline for the efforts then let the experience evolve organically...I
Who are you trying to kid... hence my phrase "you'll need to throw several thousand of whatever local currency you have at it"

12-30-2017, 09:12 AM   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
Most of us just aren't happy unless we've recommended gear that costs as much as a good used car. The thing slowing me down is the 11 year old thing. Too bad there are no good low light bridge cameras.

I'm thinking one of those motion activated wildlife cameras with a flash might be the way to go.
you are absolutely correct

a trail cam is the cheapest and most durable solution
not all cams have flexible mounting alternative though

I finally switched to a high powered flashlight and whatever camera was out for our backyard and camping safaris
as long as one of them was stable I generally get the shot I was after

my first wildlife shots were with a spotmatic and a 50mm/1.4 lens...I just learned to get closer until I ended up with a gigantic vivitar 70-210 and then a 2x converter and then 400asa film...it just always goes on
12-31-2017, 06:33 PM   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aslyfox Quote
never had a personal experience with a badger

but if there are no differences between those in the US and Scotland

they are reputed to be quite a fierce and dangerous animal if they feel threatened, you have " invaded " their space and they feel they have no retreat

like all wildlife, telephoto lenses are advised with cropping in pp if necessary

may not eat you but could do a lot of damage with those claws and jaws
I think that the badgers in the UK are much different and a great deal less aggressive than the North American version. Also much less likely to act like their cousin the wolverine.
12-31-2017, 07:36 PM - 4 Likes   #41
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While I can understand people suggesting him using a trail cam, I think he may be interested in tracking down the beasts, and then getting a picture to show the fruits of his labour. If he uses a regular camera then he has to learn to track, and also learn how to use a camera. Sure it is difficult taking low light pictures, but that doesn't mean he isn't capable of doing such. Who knows maybe he will become an expert in night photography, and will have tons of beautiful high quality pictures.
I think a camera is the way to go. We just have to hope someone is going to sell a workable quality camera for a manageable price.
There has to be someone out there somewhere who is upgrading or has upgraded and is willing to give the kid a shot in the arm.
I would do it myself but I already gave a younger photographer a shot in the arm and gave in my Nikon D300 with a zoom lens and GPS along with a few other goodies. Its something I do. I always give my old cameras away to up and coming photographers.
So hopefully there is someone out there that thinks the same way.
12-31-2017, 08:10 PM   #42
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Hey, I have an idea, what about setting up a hide for a K20d and leave insitu with a 'catch in focus' trap set. As soon as the badger enters the focus range of the trap, the camera takes a shot. Use a lure to attract the badger to the desired spot.

When not 'badgering' you can use the camera in a more conventional way.
01-01-2018, 02:51 AM - 1 Like   #43
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Currently the parents are thinking trail cam, sadly. The lad's thinking proper camera. They are negotiating ...

There's some interesting articles about adapting PIR sensors as triggers, ie a DIY exercise. This would open up a whole load of learning options, rather than getting a trial cam and just sticking it on a tree. As GMounk says the tracking and involvement of a camera, would open up a lot of avenues. In the UK, I recall my Duke of Edinburgh's outdoor award being an exercise in tracking, building and setting up photo equipment on a hill behind my grandparents, and then spending many fruitless hours with my designs failing. All analogue of course. Still I then went onto read physics at uni and then into the electronics industry, before moving into software at IBM. These early experiences, and failures, are probably like many of us here why we still fiddle with stuff and don't just buy out-of-the-box. I'm with the lad, rather than the parents ...
01-01-2018, 04:37 AM - 1 Like   #44
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Happy New Year folks

hate to be a downer but just wondering

1 any wild animal will defend itself if it feels it cannot retreat so there is always possible danger to the photographer

2 there is a danger of interfering with the animal, even unintentionally, driving it from its territory - imagine driving the parents from the den and leaving the young alone and undefended

3 possible answer, urge the kid to research the animal, check with " experts " on what to do and not to do before acting

4 another reason to research - is the animal protected by law from interference ?

5 I, too, support the idea of the kid getting a " real " camera and support his journey

_________________________

I, too, have done " donations " as suggested by GMounk:

" There has to be someone out there somewhere who is upgrading or has upgraded and is willing to give the kid a shot in the arm.
I would do it myself but I already gave a younger photographer a shot in the arm and gave in my Nikon D300 with a zoom lens and GPS along with a few other goodies. Its something I do. I always give my old cameras away to up and coming photographers.

So hopefully there is someone out there that thinks the same way. "

_________________

but for me, I'm in the wrong area is there someone on the forum more local that might help out??

Last edited by aslyfox; 01-01-2018 at 05:06 AM.
01-01-2018, 05:36 AM - 1 Like   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by BarryE Quote
Currently the parents are thinking trail cam, sadly. The lad's thinking proper camera. They are negotiating ...

There's some interesting articles about adapting PIR sensors as triggers, ie a DIY exercise. This would open up a whole load of learning options, rather than getting a trial cam and just sticking it on a tree. As GMounk says the tracking and involvement of a camera, would open up a lot of avenues. In the UK, I recall my Duke of Edinburgh's outdoor award being an exercise in tracking, building and setting up photo equipment on a hill behind my grandparents, and then spending many fruitless hours with my designs failing. All analogue of course. Still I then went onto read physics at uni and then into the electronics industry, before moving into software at IBM. These early experiences, and failures, are probably like many of us here why we still fiddle with stuff and don't just buy out-of-the-box. I'm with the lad, rather than the parents ...
I believe the investigation and observation is what draws a naturalist of any age
phrased any way you want but a hunter is being born (not a killer)
the skills acquired are lifelong gifts

the gear used is secondary to the main experience

for years I carried binoculars, an Olympus point and shoot, a Olympus tape recorder, pad and pencil in the daypack that went everywhere I did

one of my best remembered adventures was tracking an eagle to its roost when I should have been working (the benefits of a job with a truck)
thirty miles of muddy, snowy roads for a notation in a memo pad and a snapshot of a speck on a 4x6 print., but the speck had a white head
thirty five years later eagles still use that stand of trees

anyway the kid needs a real camera with some reach
brand doesn't matter
type really doesn't matter

I priced out some used combos here in the states...a km/2000 and a tamron 70-300 for around 200usd or the original 55-300 for 250
i'm sure there are equivalent bargains in the uk
the cost of plastic bags to make the rig waterproof is negligible

I picked up a Panasonic zs50 for about 200usd (clearance)
a superzoom that has good glass and takes adequate shots even at 720mm
at some of the distances I've used it mirage was more of a problem than the camera's ability to resolve (eagles again )

so we're back to it...the kid needs a real camera
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