Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
07-06-2019, 01:00 PM   #1
Junior Member




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 29
Technique Question: Portrait Photography with a Milky Way background

I am applying a 12 megapixel camera; a 24mm equivalent, f/2 lens; tripod; UV filter; red-filter illumination; and remote to solve this problem.

What shall I look for in exposure and shutter speed? Shall a use a skylight instead of a UV filter? Aside from using red illumination, are there any other lighting considerations? Any advice would be much appreciated.

Be well, my photographer friends.

SmilinBob

07-06-2019, 04:46 PM   #2
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
SharkyCA's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Carleton Place, Ontario, Canada
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 316
You may enjoy this!
PENTAX: The choice for astrophotography / Beautiful Photo-life | RICOH IMAGING
07-06-2019, 07:36 PM   #3
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: May 2007
Location: Flagstaff, Arizona
Posts: 469
Why any filter? There's not much UV around in the dark, and you don't want to lose any of the light that you have.

Similarly, what do you mean by "red illumination" and why? Night sky observers often use red lights or red filters on any other light they are using, but that's to help preserve night vision (the ability to see faint stuff), not to enhance any kind of subject illumination.

Are you hoping for sky illumination of your portrait subject? Unless there is some moon light, I doubt that will work (and (s)he will have to sit very still for 30 seconds or so!). So, you need some extra light for your subject. You could "paint" him/her with a flashlight during the exposure (i.e. sweep the flashlight across the subject at some point during the exposure). You'll need to experiment with the amount of "paint" needed (and perhaps worry about color balance - daylight works fine for the sky part but you will want a flashlight with similar color characteristics).
07-06-2019, 08:22 PM   #4
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
mattt's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Niagara
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,024
I can tell you that your milky way will take anywhere from 30-90 secs to expose properly. Your portrait figure will need to be painted in, but i caution that you must keep the portrait victim in place for the duration of the milkyway exposure or you will get a ghostly effect of stars shining through your portrait sitter...



A colour exposure of link above for your convenience.... I'm not so sure about your use of filters. Generally speaking a Red filter adds 1.5-2 stops to exposure times which will be very noticeable when you have esposures measured in minutes...

Attached Images
View Picture EXIF
PENTAX K-1  Photo 

Last edited by mattt; 07-06-2019 at 08:26 PM. Reason: added colour photo
07-07-2019, 12:37 PM   #5
Veteran Member
Oldbayrunner's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Havre de Grace, MD
Posts: 1,268
Good information here..... Nightscape Images - YouTube
07-07-2019, 08:27 PM   #6
Junior Member




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 29
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by SharkyCA Quote
Thanks for the advice, Sharky. I'll find out more about the ASTROTRACER. Bob

---------- Post added 07-07-19 at 08:30 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by AstroDave Quote
Why any filter? There's not much UV around in the dark, and you don't want to lose any of the light that you have.

Similarly, what do you mean by "red illumination" and why? Night sky observers often use red lights or red filters on any other light they are using, but that's to help preserve night vision (the ability to see faint stuff), not to enhance any kind of subject illumination.

Are you hoping for sky illumination of your portrait subject? Unless there is some moon light, I doubt that will work (and (s)he will have to sit very still for 30 seconds or so!). So, you need some extra light for your subject. You could "paint" him/her with a flashlight during the exposure (i.e. sweep the flashlight across the subject at some point during the exposure). You'll need to experiment with the amount of "paint" needed (and perhaps worry about color balance - daylight works fine for the sky part but you will want a flashlight with similar color characteristics).
Thanks, Dave. I am interested in the painting by flashlight. Which flashlight filters, if any, have worked for you?

---------- Post added 07-07-19 at 08:37 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by mattt Quote
I can tell you that your milky way will take anywhere from 30-90 secs to expose properly. Your portrait figure will need to be painted in, but i caution that you must keep the portrait victim in place for the duration of the milkyway exposure or you will get a ghostly effect of stars shining through your portrait sitter...



A colour exposure of link above for your convenience.... I'm not so sure about your use of filters. Generally speaking a Red filter adds 1.5-2 stops to exposure times which will be very noticeable when you have esposures measured in minutes...
Thank you for the advice, Matt.

---------- Post added 07-07-19 at 08:40 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Oldbayrunner Quote
Good information here..... Nightscape Images - YouTube
Thank you for the referral.
Be well,
Bob
07-08-2019, 06:32 AM   #7
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: May 2007
Location: Flagstaff, Arizona
Posts: 469
QuoteOriginally posted by SmilinBob Quote
Thanks, Dave. I am interested in the painting by flashlight. Which flashlight filters, if any, have worked for you?
Giving advice is easy - I haven't actually ever tried this!!

That said, I would give it a try with some kind of LED flashlight. Many LED lights tend to have spectral characteristics not too far from daylight. It's easy to try - just go out tonight and take a long exposure (10-30 seconds) of anything handy (a tree might be a good subject) and use what ever flashlight(s) you have. Experiment with how fast or slow you sweep the light across your subject to get a feel for what you want for a result.

If you have any old film-era filters, you could play with them on the flashlight to see what effect they have.
07-09-2019, 11:38 AM   #8
Junior Member




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 29
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by AstroDave Quote
Giving advice is easy - I haven't actually ever tried this!!

That said, I would give it a try with some kind of LED flashlight. Many LED lights tend to have spectral characteristics not too far from daylight. It's easy to try - just go out tonight and take a long exposure (10-30 seconds) of anything handy (a tree might be a good subject) and use what ever flashlight(s) you have. Experiment with how fast or slow you sweep the light across your subject to get a feel for what you want for a result.

If you have any old film-era filters, you could play with them on the flashlight to see what effect they have.
I appreciate your response.

07-09-2019, 07:47 PM   #9
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Bowmanville
Photos: Albums
Posts: 375
For light painting, especially at night while doing Astrophotography, I've just used the flashlight on my smartphone.
You don't need a whole lot of light for the portrait/object in relation to the longer exposure for the night sky.
I'll post the image later where I lit the road and my car while capturing the stars during the Perseid meteor shower.
The other nice thing about light paining when it's really dark is that once you turn off the light, the camera won't see the subject because it'll be too dark so the model can move and not be picked up in the exposure.
It takes a few attempts to get the balance right, but if you have a smartphone, you can just use that, it does work, and works very well.

Last edited by Kobie; 07-10-2019 at 10:01 AM.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, color, exposure, filter, filters, flashlight, illumination, light, matt, night, pentax help, photography, pm, portrait, sky, subject, troubleshooting, uv
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Night 06/25/17 Milky Way Auzzie-Phoenix Post Your Photos! 10 6 Days Ago 09:57 PM
Mark II High ISO testing for Milky Way Photography SirTomster Pentax K-1 14 05-05-2018 10:03 AM
Landscape Milky Way Photography JedlyMT Photo Critique 3 09-30-2015 12:41 PM
Is this lens good for Milky Way photography? Neville Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 13 08-08-2015 09:18 PM
Which lens for landscape AND milky way photography Carpethediem Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 29 03-23-2015 09:33 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:20 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top