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12-01-2019, 07:32 PM   #16
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Sensor swabs for sensors. I had a Lenspen or two and they were good, then they sent their manufacturing to China so unfortunately, I would be very concerned with counterfeits.

12-02-2019, 07:26 AM   #17
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i tried a Lenspen once, it left streaks on my sensor. So now I use a blower and have dust removal set for on and off of the camera, change lenses with the camera open part pointed down toward the ground/floor and I haven't had dust problem yet.
12-02-2019, 11:52 AM   #18
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The real issue is that if the lens pen picked up any dust or contaminants while used for other things, it would deposit it on the sensor. So if I used one it would be a brand new one. In fact most of the time when I throw away the lens pen its because there is enough dust or oil on the brush that it leaves marks after use.
12-02-2019, 12:28 PM   #19
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I highly recommend the Pentax O-ICK1 for sensor cleaning.
Very simple and painless. It's not the cheapest, however, I find it is well worth the cost.

Pentax Image Sensor Cleaning Kit, O-ICK1 reviews - Pentax Camera Accessory Review Database

12-02-2019, 01:00 PM - 1 Like   #20
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I'm pretty satisfied with my Lenspen Sensorklear pen. It is designed for cleaning sensor. I have succesfully used them for years with my K10D, K5 and K3ii without doing damage to sensor. Of course I have first blowed sensor and taken close look for rough particles.
12-04-2019, 11:20 AM   #21
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I agree with all the posters here. My colleague used LensPen to clean his sensor and ended up permanently damaging the sensor. Sensor swabs are cheap and it is very easy to use them.
12-04-2019, 01:00 PM   #22
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LensPen for sensor ? No, no,no.
12-04-2019, 02:22 PM   #23
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History of cleaning optical lenses...to my knowledge....originally soap, water, and fine cotton cloth was used on optical lenses like glass lenses before the 1980’s. Camera lenses have coatings and fine cleaning paper and solution made for camera lenses was used originally. Then microfibre came out and due to the fact each fibre is like a perfectly smooth rod, it will generally not scratch a lens. So glasses, camera lenses, expensive health care optical lenses/equipment are cleaned with these cloths and non-alcohol spray cleaners. After many cleanings just get rid of them-do not wash them and use on lenses.

Lenspen with activated carbon...they are only designed to be used on optical lenses...NEVER on a sensor, camera mirror. Problem IMHO is that they require a lot of rubbing in a circular motion to get an entire lens clean. Microfibre cloth, one pass and clean. Some swear by the pens...I just did not get good results on camera lenses or patient glasses.

So to my knowledge...how do manufacturers of equipment in health care with expensive optical lenses (instruments in the 50-100k cost) clean the lenses...a $5 kit of a new microfibre cloth and lens cleaner spray.

Regards.

12-04-2019, 06:48 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by VSTAR Quote
History of cleaning optical lenses...to my knowledge....originally soap, water, and fine cotton cloth was used on optical lenses like glass lenses before the 1980’s. Camera lenses have coatings and fine cleaning paper and solution made for camera lenses was used originally. Then microfibre came out and due to the fact each fibre is like a perfectly smooth rod, it will generally not scratch a lens. So glasses, camera lenses, expensive health care optical lenses/equipment are cleaned with these cloths and non-alcohol spray cleaners. After many cleanings just get rid of them-do not wash them and use on lenses.

Lenspen with activated carbon...they are only designed to be used on optical lenses...NEVER on a sensor, camera mirror. Problem IMHO is that they require a lot of rubbing in a circular motion to get an entire lens clean. Microfibre cloth, one pass and clean. Some swear by the pens...I just did not get good results on camera lenses or patient glasses.

So to my knowledge...how do manufacturers of equipment in health care with expensive optical lenses (instruments in the 50-100k cost) clean the lenses...a $5 kit of a new microfibre cloth and lens cleaner spray.

Regards.
QuoteOriginally posted by VSTAR Quote
due to the fact each fibre is like a perfectly smooth rod, it will generally not scratch a lens.
A microfibre cloth which is dirty definitely will scratch a lens. So many, many people regard them as the safest bet when cleaning lenses, but store them as an afterthought.

Similarly, the LensPen has been outed as attracting dirt and can occasion similar grief when cleaning. I do not and will not use such silly accessories when long experience and care has taught me to get the very best from a new, sealed-storage microfibre cloth. The idea that a pen could be used on a sensor leaves me numb.
12-04-2019, 07:26 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by Silent Street Quote
A microfibre cloth which is dirty definitely will scratch a lens. So many, many people regard them as the safest bet when cleaning lenses, but store them as an afterthought.

Similarly, the LensPen has been outed as attracting dirt and can occasion similar grief when cleaning. I do not and will not use such silly accessories when long experience and care has taught me to get the very best from a new, sealed-storage microfibre cloth. The idea that a pen could be used on a sensor leaves me numb.
simple work even on a piece of equipment that is worth $50k....look at the lens with a bright light....your phone...if the lens is smudged/oil/fingerprints/etc...microfiber cloth will not scratch...it will just eventually smudge your lens and then you need a new one. If lens shows physical dirt it is going to need to be blown off with a manual blower..then cleaned. Microfiber back in ouch it came in keeps it clean enough. Even a new cloth can scratch a lens. Just based on my experience.
12-05-2019, 01:23 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by VSTAR Quote
So to my knowledge...how do manufacturers of equipment in health care with expensive optical lenses (instruments in the 50-100k cost) clean the lenses...a $5 kit of a new microfibre cloth and lens cleaner spray.
Not healthcare, but here's how one optics coating factory cleans. They coat other companies' glass products before assembly, and also do custom work for telescopes, spacecraft, and military. Their most common cleaning method is a low-tech spray of distilled water with a few drops of dishwashing liquid added, then dry with Kimwipes (disposable lint-free tissues).

That cleaning method is for bare lenses and filters where there's no risk of getting liquid inside an assembled lens. It's obviously not suitable for sensors inside a camera.
12-05-2019, 08:09 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by DeadJohn Quote
Not healthcare, but here's how one optics coating factory cleans. They coat other companies' glass products before assembly, and also do custom work for telescopes, spacecraft, and military. Their most common cleaning method is a low-tech spray of distilled water with a few drops of dishwashing liquid added, then dry with Kimwipes (disposable lint-free tissues).

That cleaning method is for bare lenses and filters where there's no risk of getting liquid inside an assembled lens. It's obviously not suitable for sensors inside a camera.
Cleaning a glass, uncoated, unmounted lens would be different than a glass or plastic lens, already coated, mounted, and already exposed to the elements.
12-10-2019, 02:45 PM   #28
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I noticed that some of the respondents use a Rocket Blower to clean the sensor. I have a cheap blower with a removable brush that I recently used to blow dust off my K50 sensor. It worked well. I assume that the Rocket Blower delivers a hurricane blast to clean. Is such a blast really needed? Isn't dust only lightly attached to a sensor?
12-10-2019, 02:58 PM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by psoo Quote
I noticed that some of the respondents use a Rocket Blower to clean the sensor. I have a cheap blower with a removable brush that I recently used to blow dust off my K50 sensor. It worked well. I assume that the Rocket Blower delivers a hurricane blast to clean. Is such a blast really needed? Isn't dust only lightly attached to a sensor?
The Rocket Blower comes in different sizes. The largest produces the most air force, whereas a medium or small version less.

There are other reasons that make the Giotto Rocket Blower superior:

a) There is a one way intake air valve that essentially filters the air that is blown. Most blowers suck and blow from the same orifice.
b) I've never had one break on me. The quality of the rubber (silicone?) lasts for a very, very long time.
c) They won't roll away. The fins not only prevent them from rolling out of the helicopter or sinking ship, but putting the rocket in the upright launch position not only keeps the tip clean, it looks cool.
12-10-2019, 03:28 PM   #30
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The word LENS Pen is a clue.

Never use something designed for lenses on a sensor.
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