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08-12-2020, 11:58 AM   #1
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Pentax K-7 shake reduction with manual zoom lenses

Hello,
I have just acquired a used K-7 and I have one question regarding the shake reduction setting for manual zoom lenses. For my SMC Pentax-M zoom 80-200mm, should I set it to 80mm, 200mm or somewhere in between? Or turn it off. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks

08-12-2020, 12:08 PM   #2
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Not a definitive answer but my guess would be if you use one general area of the zoom over others to set it in that range, but if you use the whole zoom range to set it to the middle at 140mm. By choosing the middle you would still likely get most of the benefit but as you move from the middle it will become less effective. Now if you find you are mostly shooting at let's say 80-150mm then picking a value of 115mm would be better as you would get the best stabilization where you mostly use the lens.

If you are really good turning it off is always an option and should be done when shooting off of a tripod.
08-12-2020, 12:29 PM   #3
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Hi Snapper retrņ,

QuoteOriginally posted by Retro Snapper Quote
I have just acquired a used K-7 and I have one question regarding the shake reduction setting for manual zoom lenses. For my SMC Pentax-M zoom 80-200mm, should I set it to 80mm, 200mm or somewhere in between? Or turn it off. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Hi, The question you are asking is legitimate, but there is no univocal answer, the shake reduction on the Pentax K7 is about 3 stops (with Safox VIII+ ),
Obviously it is one thing to 80mm and another to 200mm considering the variant of the focal length.
Once activated you can evaluate how different it is with and without the stabilization of the sensor activated and consequently increase the ISO (time/diaphragm) in limit conditions.
You just have to try and try again, this is my advice, knowing the limits of your DSLR takes a certain amount of time.

If you shoot with safe shutter speeds, i.e. the reciprocal of the focal, you could also deactivate the shake reduction, but certainly if you are at the limit it is wiser to insert it.

Good shots, Mario
08-12-2020, 01:42 PM - 5 Likes   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Retro Snapper Quote
Hello,
I have just acquired a used K-7 and I have one question regarding the shake reduction setting for manual zoom lenses. For my SMC Pentax-M zoom 80-200mm, should I set it to 80mm, 200mm or somewhere in between? Or turn it off. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
If you are going to be shooting at varying FL during one session then set it to the lowest setting 80mm. Using a SR setting higher than the FL in use can result in over-compensation by the mechanism and actually induce blur into your shots.

08-12-2020, 01:55 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by pschlute Quote
If you are going to be shooting at varying FL during one session then set it to the lowest setting 80mm. Using a SR setting higher than the FL in use can result in over-compensation by the mechanism and actually induce blur into your shots.
+1
pschlute is spot on: you would typically select the lowest focal length that you would use.
08-12-2020, 02:13 PM   #6
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If you have a zoom with focal length markings like the 80-200, just compose with the zoom setting you want, note the focal length and enter it in Menu item 4 input focal length. Easy work flow. For primes, you can just enter at startup and it will remember the setting. Zooms require just that setting to maximize the SR efficiency.
08-12-2020, 02:15 PM - 2 Likes   #7
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The "technically correct" "official answer" is to re-set the focal length on the camera each time you re-set the zoom on the lens ... this ain't gonna happen so pschlute's answer is the best compromise.
Don't get into a flap about this. Shake Reduction is a great feature and really useful when needed, ie. at slow shutter speeds. Under more 'normal' circumstances, in good light, a sensible choice of shutter speed with good technique will serve just as well


Enjoy!
08-12-2020, 02:31 PM   #8
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Exactly like Pschlute said, set it to the widest end... the other day I mistakenly set my 20mm to a 200mm SR and until I realized the stabilizer was rattling left and right I ruined *every* picture beyond repair. Obviously the effect won't be as pronounced setting to 135 instead of 80, but setting the SR anywhere longer than the zoom's minimum setting will make it actively work against you at some point.

08-12-2020, 02:45 PM - 1 Like   #9
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I have a different view on this. As the M80-200mm is quite a large lens even when set to 80mm I always take the highest mm, in this case 200. A real 80mm lens is so much smaller than this zoom and the longer the lens the easier you move the camera with lens when exposing. So I always set it to the highest value and in my experience pictures are much sharper than with the actual focal length. My advise is to experiment with this too. With 555gr this lens is quite heavy and with the weight of the camera added you have more chance of a slight movement with exposing. This lens is twice the weight of the M 85mm and thrice the length. I feel you have to compensate for that difference in weight and length. This is what I do and it works well for me.
08-12-2020, 03:56 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by AfterPentax Quote
I have a different view on this. As the M80-200mm is quite a large lens even when set to 80mm I always take the highest mm, in this case 200. A real 80mm lens is so much smaller than this zoom and the longer the lens the easier you move the camera with lens when exposing. So I always set it to the highest value and in my experience pictures are much sharper than with the actual focal length. My advise is to experiment with this too. With 555gr this lens is quite heavy and with the weight of the camera added you have more chance of a slight movement with exposing. This lens is twice the weight of the M 85mm and thrice the length. I feel you have to compensate for that difference in weight and length. This is what I do and it works well for me.
Sorry but this makes no sense to me.

SR does not care about the size or length or weight of the lens in use. All it does care about is that the distance from the convergence point in the lens to the sensor is 80mm or 200mm. It then knows that for a certain amount of camera "shake" as measured by the camera's accelerometer, it needs to adjust the sensor to correct for that movement based on the FL it either reads from the lens or is input manually.

If the physical attributes of a lens tend to make you "shake" more or less, the camera is well aware of that and will correct more or less accordingly.
08-12-2020, 05:03 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by kypfer Quote
The "technically correct" "official answer" is to re-set the focal length on the camera each time you re-set the zoom on the lens .
The internet answer is to always use a $2000 tripod so you don't need SR. The nearest answer is then to spend years developing your shooting stability.😀
If you are stable you don't need SR. If you are too unstable SR is no help. When you are a little unstable SR can compensate. Setting the focal length short will still help but only for some of your instability.
08-13-2020, 05:38 AM   #12
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Thank you everyone for your replies. I seem to have started a bit of a debate. The advice from Pschlute to set the shortest FL seems most compelling so I shall try that first. Swanlefitte, like most people I do not have a $2000 tripod (I would have bought a fully auto lens first). My main reason for asking the question is that when out taking pictures, especially of wildlife, I do not have time to "set up" the shot. It is usually zoom, focus, click (not forgetting the green button). I agree with you all, there is no substitute for good technique, I am working on that. Thanks again to everyone for replying.
08-13-2020, 06:58 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by pschlute Quote
Sorry but this makes no sense to me.

SR does not care about the size or length or weight of the lens in use. All it does care about is that the distance from the convergence point in the lens to the sensor is 80mm or 200mm. It then knows that for a certain amount of camera "shake" as measured by the camera's accelerometer, it needs to adjust the sensor to correct for that movement based on the FL it either reads from the lens or is input manually.

If the physical attributes of a lens tend to make you "shake" more or less, the camera is well aware of that and will correct more or less accordingly.
I think that his point is that, since the lens if larger and heavier than an ordinary 80mm lens, you will be more likely to move the camera that you would with a lighter 80mm prime lens.

I don't know if this is true, but it doesn't seem entirely implausible to me.
08-13-2020, 07:56 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by noblepa Quote
I think that his point is that, since the lens if larger and heavier than an ordinary 80mm lens, you will be more likely to move the camera that you would with a lighter 80mm prime lens.
I understand that part. My point is that the SR mechanism will register the extra movement and adjust the sensor accordingly.

SR works by the camera detecting movement during the capture. If you are able to hold the camera almost perfectly still, the SR will be applying very little compensation. If you are moving the camera more during capture the SR will apply more correction.
08-13-2020, 09:52 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by pschlute Quote
I understand that part. My point is that the SR mechanism will register the extra movement and adjust the sensor accordingly.

SR works by the camera detecting movement during the capture. If you are able to hold the camera almost perfectly still, the SR will be applying very little compensation. If you are moving the camera more during capture the SR will apply more correction.
If the camera is only detecting movement, then why do you have to enter the focal length? If it only detects movement there is no need to give in the focal length. But since you have to enter the focal length the camera obviously uses more parameters than just the movement. With primes I know that the focal length usually fits a certain lens model and the camera uses an average to obtain a certain compensation. But a zoom is a different kettle of fish. Especially when it is a manual zoom. With any modern automatic zoom the lens interacts with the camera. With a manual it does not. So my point is that you have experiment with a manual zoom to obtain the best result with SR compensation.
I found out that with the 80-200 you obtain the best result when you give in a high focal length instead of the focal length that you used. I think that built in SR detects what lens is used, whether it is a prime or a zoom and compensates accordingly. So SR will compensate for the physical length and weight of the lens and focal length used. But that is impossible with a manual lens, because there is no interaction. So the photographer has to try to find the ultimate compensation for camera shake. But ofcourse I can be completely wrong, but this is how it works for me and made me question of how SR really works.
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