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08-05-2022, 04:12 PM - 1 Like   #1
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Need for help and opinions for an analog camera

Hello!
does
anyone have hands on experience with one of these
cameras?
Olympus om2, or Minolta srt100x with 50mm 1.7 or
Pentax spotmatic sp1000 with 55mm $1.8
Which one would be more comfortable and easier for a
beginner to deal with? And if the Olympus om2 isn’t available is there any similar like cameras? Please feel free to suggest cameras

08-05-2022, 04:38 PM   #2
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Welcome to the forums

you will find friendly members and a lot of knowledge here

here is information on the Spotmatic SP 1000:

QuoteQuote:
Description:
The PENTAX SP1000 replaced the SP500 as the budget model. It was basically the original Spotmatic (which had been introduced 9 years earlier) but without a self timer. It thus didn't have recent advances such as the open aperture metering found in the Spotmatic F and ES series.


Read more at: https://www.pentaxforums.com/camerareviews/pentax-sp1000.html#ixzz7b8VmFqi0
08-05-2022, 05:18 PM - 3 Likes   #3
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Why these three specifically? I don't know the Minolta, but the SP1000 and OM2 seem very different. The SP1000 is an older manual camera with screw mount lenses, and the OM2 is an aperture priority automatic with manual override. I'd pick the ME Super as more of an equivalent to the OM2, and I'd go for the Pentax over the Olympus. If you poke around a bit, you can get an ME Super for pretty good prices. I'd go for that. You'll get a camera that is aperture priority with a full manual mode. They are nice and compact and friendly to learn with. I bought mine new, and it's still kicking. One of the neat things about a Pentax K mount body is being able to use a really large array of lenses. You'll be able to use all the old screw mount M42 lenses (with an adapter) plus many of the K mount lenses.
08-05-2022, 06:12 PM - 2 Likes   #4
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As ClickClick said, those are three different cameras.
The OM2 has two shooting modes, automatic, and manual, it's also a mostly electronic camera, the lens mount is unique, no one else used it, and though there are many used lenses around, they can be harder to track down.

The other two, the Minolta and the Pentax are fully manual exposure, and mechanical. In Olympus the more comparable body is the OM1.
The Minolta is a solid workhorse, fully manual, battery only operates the meter. Minolta has a unique lens mount, but it was around for longer than the Olympus, and there were many more Minoltas sold, so a bigger range of old lenses out there.
The Pentax SP1000, is really the screw mount version of a K1000, which might be a better camera to look for. The K1000 will operate much like the SP1000, but has the advantage of the K-bayonet mount for lenses, which opens up a huge world of old lenses to try out. As mentioned above, a K-mount camera can also be easily adapted for use with screw mount lenses. The battery to run the K1000 meter is easier to find too.

One thing to factor into all of these, is they are all at least 40-years old, the spotmatic and minolta, are more in the 50-year old range. Count on needing to have them Clean, Lubed and Adjusted (CLA), figure it into your purchase costs. They will likely need the light seals in the back, around the film door replaced too.
An all mechanical camera from this age (such as the Minolta or Pentax) tends to be easier to find parts for. The Electronic cameras (OM2 and others) can be hard to find electronics for if they need replacement.
Hope this helps get you pointed in the right direction,

08-06-2022, 12:34 AM   #5
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The OM-2 is a lovely camera, small for an SLR, with a big bright viewfinder, electronic shutter and automatic exposure. If it goes wrong, you’re stuck, since getting such an old camera repaired is most unlikely, but that’s the risk with all old cameras. An SP1000 uses screw-mount M42 thread lenses which are still around on the secondhand market but I’d recommend a Pentax with K mount fitting like a K1000, KM, KX or the lovely little MX (which has an equally bright viewfinder to the Olympus) and are all mechanical. I don’t know the Minolta, but remember them from when I had an SP500 Pentax. I still have my MX and remember how chuffed I was to finally get my hands on one!

Last edited by StiffLegged; 08-06-2022 at 02:44 AM.
08-06-2022, 02:38 AM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by clickclick Quote
Why these three specifically?
I'm guessing the OP has been offered these, because they don't have much else in common.

QuoteOriginally posted by K-Three Quote
The Pentax SP1000, is really the screw mount version of a K1000, which might be a better camera to look for.
The K1000 sells at prices that are inflated beyond all reason. Poor value for money.

QuoteOriginally posted by clickclick Quote
[on a K-mount camera] You'll be able to use all the old screw mount M42 lenses (with an adapter) ...
The OP wants advice for a beginner so they won't want to be faffing around with adaptors. I doubt they will be looking for a huge range of lenses either. You can get M42 screw mount adaptors for practically any camera mount anyway so it is not a factor in chosing a body.

I would advise the Minolta out of the OP's list, a straightforward manual mechanical film camera with a good reputation at reasonable prices. The Pentax KX would be the nearest Pentax equivalent other than the K1000 or KM (which is almost exactly like a K1000 but slightly better).
08-06-2022, 03:21 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lord Lucan Quote
… The K1000 sells at prices that are inflated beyond all reason. Poor value for money.
Depends where in the world you are: in the US they often are, but we don’t know where the OP is. In the UK they’re available for more reasonable prices.

08-06-2022, 06:37 AM - 1 Like   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by StiffLegged Quote
. . . but we don’t know where the OP is. . . .
the OP has indicated in her profile information that she is from Egypt
08-06-2022, 10:20 AM - 1 Like   #9
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The camera brand and model are the easy parts - lots of old cameras around in various mounts. The hardest part might be service. Even a newish film body has likely been in a drawer for 20 years, and a mostly mechanical camera can be 50-70 years old. It's a good idea to clean, lubricate and adjust an old camera, so starting there might be the best idea. Who does that in my area and what do they work on? Then think about models, lenses and features for those brands. The popular brands were all competitive enough so you should be able to find a decent camera from any manufacturer.

Or look at cameras that someone can show have been serviced in the last few years. That might be cheaper overall than purchasing a random camera and getting it serviced yourself.
6 Days Ago   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sara t Quote
And if the Olympus om2 isn’t available is there any similar like cameras? Please feel free to suggest cameras
What aspects are you finding attractive in this model?

Film bodies, even those in fine condition, are for the most part pretty easy to find. Only those in the high-end pro-style category are somewhat expensive. Most 35mm film camera models, even some much more advanced that these three you mention, are not near the cost they were when new. Any of those old cameras can more likely be subject to failure due to wear, including the seals preventing stray light from getting to the film. So perhaps a Pentax model K-mount, not of screw-in lens design, if you can find one guaranteed in excellent condition.

I just checked and found some from-Japan offered here in US eBay of the very fine Pentax K2- one with the fine Pentax SMC "M" 50mm f/1.4 lens- rated Excellent +5, for $134 plus $44 shipping to the US. Another K2 chrome/black style with the also VG Pentax SMC 55mm f/1.8 lens for $180 with free shipping rated excellent +3. Returns allowed with both. Just some examples of what might be available.

As to the Minolta, this brand was discontinued many years ago, now harder to find lenses or parts.

Last edited by mikesbike; 6 Days Ago at 04:31 PM.
6 Days Ago   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sara t Quote
Hello!
does
anyone have hands on experience with one of these
cameras?
Olympus om2, or Minolta srt100x with 50mm 1.7 or
Pentax spotmatic sp1000 with 55mm $1.8
Which one would be more comfortable and easier for a
beginner to deal with? And if the Olympus om2 isn’t available is there any similar like cameras? Please feel free to suggest cameras
I purchased a Spotmatic recently with a 50mm lens.
I preferred that combination because I prefer wider lenses, and Takumar 50mm lenses are readily available,
even though 55mm seem to have been common ‘back in the day’.
6 Days Ago   #12
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When I shot film more frequently than I do now, I usually found that a 35mm lens more nearly approximated to my field of vision - then again, I do have good peripheral vision. Might I enquire, however, why a film camera is considered a good choice for a beginner, unless specified for a college course ? Film can be costly, somewhat fiddly for some, and processing seems to be more and more expensive these days. I took a long time to be convinced of the merits of Digital, but for ease of use I think it beats film, leaving the user the option of concentrating more on the actual images being created.
5 Days Ago   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sara t Quote
Which one would be more comfortable and easier for a
beginner to deal with?
A basic 35mm SLR shooting in Manual mode is great to get a feel for how to adjust for various lighting, control depth of field (DOF), effects for action scenes, etc. When I first started, there was no automatic anything. You had to read the camera's meter, take into account lighting that can fool the meter, set your choice of aperture, shutter speed, and focus manually. That was it for each shot.

However, by beginner, do you mean being a beginner just for shooting film?

---------- Post added 08-08-22 at 02:29 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by 35mmfilmfan Quote
Might I enquire, however, why a film camera is considered a good choice for a beginner, unless specified for a college course ? Film can be costly, somewhat fiddly for some, and processing seems to be more and more expensive these days. I took a long time to be convinced of the merits of Digital, but for ease of use I think it beats film, leaving the user the option of concentrating more on the actual images being created.
If not and you are a beginner for shooting with full-control cameras rather than cell phones or point-and-shoot compacts, then I definitely agree with this ^^.

With a DSLR you can still shoot in Manual mode and set everything yourself, just as with an all-manual 35mm film SLR camera. But you would also have more controllability and thus more able to explore the possibilities photography can bring. The savings in film costs will pay for the camera over time, even if you buy one on the expensive side, which if you can could well be better long-term for both features and durability.

If buying used, I always recommend getting a former Pentax flagship model if possible, and of course always one of moderate use and in fine condition. These models are built more durably and have superior controls. A Pentax K-5 II or K-5 IIs would be a great choice. If wanting more recent, then a K-3.

Last edited by mikesbike; 5 Days Ago at 02:37 PM.
4 Days Ago   #14
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Book Suggestion

I would like to suggest a book that I enjoyed. It is called “Film Gear” by Christof Bircher. It is one-page summaries of dozens of film SLRs, with his personal opinions about e.g. features, how enjoyable it is to use, how reliable it is, and comparisons to other cameras (among other things).
4 Days Ago   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by Just1MoreDave Quote
Or look at cameras that someone can show have been serviced in the last few years. That might be cheaper overall than purchasing a random camera and getting it serviced yourself.
That's a point I was going to make, too. A decades-old film camera is bound to have an issue of some sort, usually more than one. Light seal problems are a given, I think, though that's a relatively easy fix. But there are other problems that may be less evident.

Of those three cameras, the one I would NOT pick is the Minolta SRT-10x . . . but that may be just my experience. First time I picked up an SRT-101, I found my right hand bumping into what I'm remembering as the depth of field preview button at the lower side of the lens mount. I'm sure others know more about the quality of the Minolta bodies than I do, but that 101 felt clunky to me, on the low end of the ergonomic scale. I'm sure that colored my perception of Minoltas for the rest of their production years.

Someone mentioned how easy it is to find K-mount lenses, and how an adapter lets you use m42 lenses on K-mount bodies. So a K-mount body is a good choice, though an m42 body is a good second choice--though a random m42 body would most likely be older than any K-mount body. Then again, I suppose the difference between a 40-45 year old camera and a 50-60 year old camera wouldn't be that great in terms of condition.

Anyway, if possible, try holding and dry-operating the different brands and models you're considering. What feels good in the hand will be more fun to use, and you'll use it lots more in the long run. And what feels good to one person may feel awkward to another. I think that's one of the most important considerations in buying anything, really, be it a pen, a camera, a knife, whatever.

Good luck!
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