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03-10-2009, 08:07 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by StevenVH Quote
Which part of my comment is confusing? Simply put, if you record an image in RAW format you get "...CCD output data saved without processing." And "Effects such as White Balance, Custom Image and Color Space are not applied to the image...."
WB and other corrections are applied by the software used to view and process the RAW image. You can use or set the camera to create a JPEG file which will apply the effects settings of the camera.
This is half-true. The settings you make in-camera will get applied to the embedded JPEG that is used when reviewing on LCD (and in some browser software on the PC), and the white balance will be recorded as well and will normally be used as the default during later raw image post-processing. So it is true that these are not part of the raw sensor data recorded, but there are still benefits to making some efforts for white-balance in-camera.

03-10-2009, 02:14 PM   #17
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I just bought a grey card and am absolutely thrilled with it. I still shoot in RAW for most things, but getting that white balance right the first time really saves time having to go back and fix things afterwards. And even though you have to do it every time your light changes, setting the manual white balance to the grey card only takes seconds.

It's also nice to see that beautiful, accurate color represented in the LCD screen so you get the instant gratification!
03-10-2009, 02:26 PM   #18
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i find it a real problem outside when the sun can't decide whether to come out or not.... but I shoot RAW anyway. Just adds another few seconds onto the workflow....

Bret
03-10-2009, 08:57 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by bretti_kivi Quote
i find it a real problem outside when the sun can't decide whether to come out or not.... but I shoot RAW anyway. Just adds another few seconds onto the workflow....

Bret
If in doubt and I'm outside, I just use AWB and shoot raw. At least the previews on LCD and on the computer will be reasonably useful. I would have to imagine that even when shooting jpeg you wouldn't need to correct by all that much.

05-29-2009, 04:23 PM   #20
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for a complete novice like myself, i thought i didn't have to do anything because it was set on auto...

...but because i always shoot in raw, I've realized I really don't have to do anything...


...until I upload the images
05-29-2009, 05:53 PM   #21
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get a Robin Myers grey card and learn to use manual WB. It'll become second nature after awhile. It'll be much more accurate then guessing in Photoshop.
05-29-2009, 08:07 PM   #22
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Can programs like Picassa or Gimp "tune" the white balance on JPG (not RAW) images after they have been taken? Or are we stuck shooting RAW?
05-30-2009, 11:44 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by PortieOwner Quote
Can programs like Picassa or Gimp "tune" the white balance on JPG (not RAW) images after they have been taken? Or are we stuck shooting RAW?
There must be a white balance tool in those programmes. I have not seen anything that does not have a tool to change the WB, myself. I use Lightroom 2.3, and there is a really neat eyedropper tool in the white balance section. Just click on whatever grey object that should be neutral, and presto, changeo the WB is set. You can then select all the images that were in the same light, and apply it globally to the selected images.

05-30-2009, 12:02 PM   #24
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They can try but they they won't succeed nearly as well as they would for RAW. The terminology is quite apt - trying to change WB after it's been converted to JPEG is like trying to change a pancake into a waffle after it's already been cooked.
05-30-2009, 12:25 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by Marc Sabatella Quote
They can try but they they won't succeed nearly as well as they would for RAW. The terminology is quite apt - trying to change WB after it's been converted to JPEG is like trying to change a pancake into a waffle after it's already been cooked.
I should have added the caveat about 8 bit vs 12 bit images. Mea culpa.
06-04-2009, 08:41 AM   #26
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This had been most helpful to me!

I now undestand why my RAW files didn't reflect all the efforts to get WB correct (learning THAT by trial & error)...

I would make changes and the the images still needed tweaking.
06-04-2009, 11:27 AM   #27
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In my camera bag I always have a few white coffee filters. Often they are used for a variety of things, but when I am on location, either inside or out, I wrap a white coffee filter around my lens, point it at the prevalent light source, and shoot a custom white balance through the filter. Works PERFECT for me on every occasion. Cheap too!
06-04-2009, 01:42 PM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
I should have added the caveat about 8 bit vs 12 bit images. Mea culpa.
Not that it really matters, but it's actually more than 8 versus 12 bits: it's how you get from 12 to 8 bits that's the rub. RAW files contian the sensor data as unadulterated as its going to get into terms of how much R, G, or B at each pixel site. But JPEG has the individual R, G, and B values from neighboring pixel sites combined and then "cooked" with the camera's WB setting to produce one RGB value for each pixel. If that WB setting is good", then the RGB pixels in the JPEG will have a decent range of colors - the proce"ss of "cooking" with the the right WB setting is to amplify the values that weren't actually as strong in the original.

For example, under tungsten light there isn't much blue, but if the camera processes the image using the tungsten preset, the the blue that is present is amplified, and you get a "normal" amount of blue in the JPEG so we can recognize colors, see white as white, etc.

But if you had the WB wrong in the camera - like set to cloudy - you're actually telling the camera to take those already-weak blue values and *decrease them*. At that point, it probably wouldn't matter if you saving 12 bits JPEGs (if such a thing existed) - you've gone and tossed away some of what little blue info you had to work with. Going down from 12 bits to 8 just exacerbates the problem - you've probably decreased the blue now to the point where it disappears entirely. A JPEG taken under tungsten light but with the cloudy preset probably has "0" for the B component of every single pixel, except maybe a bright blue shirt, that at best would be coming out as grey and could possible be rescued to some extent, albeit probably with noticeable with posterization.
06-04-2009, 10:44 PM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by StevenVH Quote
When shooting in RAW none of the in-camera effects (WB, Custom Image, etc.) are applied to the image. In-camera effects only apply to JPEGs processed by the camera. See p.148 of the manual for more info.

hth
QuoteOriginally posted by vievetrick Quote
Not sure what your point is? What ever WB setting you have the camera set to is what you will see when the shot is on the card and in post processing to start with anyway. I am not picking a fight just confused by your statement.
Just confirming why RAW works with an explanation for the OP.

This accented what you suggested; shoot RAW.

I was going to suggest that as well, but you already did.

Your post was an alternative and the other post was the reason why.
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